Bibliography of Mississippi History: Annotated Secondary Sources

The Bibliography of Mississippi History consists of briefly annotated secondary sources (books and journal articles by professional and amateur historians, doctoral dissertations, and master's theses). Primary sources (newspaper and magazine articles, edited personal papers, autobiographies, memoirs, and other first-person accounts) are not included, but users of the bibliography will generally find relevant primary sources identified in the footnotes or endnotes of the secondary sources. The bibliography is current only through the mid-1990s, but it will be updated periodically.

Grants from the American Association for State and Local History and the Phil Hardin Foundation of Meridian allowed me to put aside my work as research librarian and bibliographer for the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi in order to devote uninterrupted time to the project. My thanks also go to the center's associate director, Ann Abadie; to my graduate assistants, especially Barry Gildea; to librarian and attorney Ann Tunnessen, who volunteered her expertise; and to my husband, Charles, who first suggested the idea for the project.

Brenda M. Eagles
Oxford, Mississippi
November 9, 2006


Note: This bibliography is the work of Brenda M. Eagles, not the Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH), and is not meant to be a guide to materials found in MDAH collections. To determine if a resource is contained within MDAH holdings, please search the online catalog.


Bibliography of Mississippi History

Abbey, Kathryn T. "Peter Chester's Defense of the Mississippi after the Willing Raid." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 22, no. 1 (June 1935): 17-32.

Efforts of Chester, governor of British West Florida, to prevent further penetration of the Lower Mississippi River by Americans following James Willing's successful 1778 expedition to New Orleans to retrieve purchased munitions for the Revolutionary War.


Abbott, Martin. "Indian Policy and Management in the Mississippi Territory, 1798-1817." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no. 3 (July 1952): 153-69.

Argues that federal policy toward the Choctaws and Chickasaws weakened their resistance to the advance of white settlement.


Abernathy, Thomas Perkins. The Burr Conspiracy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1954. 301 pp.

Chapter thirteen, "Burr in Mississippi," deals with Aaron Burr's 1807 detention in Washington (Adams Co.) before being transported to Richmond, Virginia, for trial on a charge of promoting the secession from the United States of New Orleans, the Louisiana Purchase, and Spanish territory west of the Mississippi River.


Abernathy, Thomas Perkins. The South in the New Nation, 1789-1819. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1961. Vol. 4 of The History of the South. xvi, 529 pp.

Includes chapters on the Yazoo land companies of 1789 and 1795, the West Florida rebellion, and the great migration to land in present-day Alabama and Mississippi.


Abernathy, Thomas Perkins. "Aaron Burr in Mississippi." Journal of Southern History 15, no. 1 (Feb. 1949): 9-21.

Describes presidential nominee Aaron Burr's 1800 visit to the Mississippi Territory, where he revived political factionalism.


Abney, F. Glenn. "Factors Related to Negro Voter Turnout in Mississippi." Journal of Politics 36, no. 4 (Nov. 1974): 1057-63.

Maintains that voter turnout, rather than registration, constitutes the "crucial variable" in gauging the effect of black enfranchisement; uses the vote for African American gubernatorial candidate Charles Evers in 1971 as a measure of black turnout.


Abney, M.G. "Reconstruction in Pontotoc County." Papers of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 229-69.

Covers politics, government, economy, schools, and the Ku Klux Klan; appendices list officeholders and statistics on slaves and their owners, population, agriculture, manufacturing, taxes, and churches; introduction includes early history of the county.


Acheson, Sam Hanna. Joe Bailey, the Last Democrat. New York: Macmillan, 1932.

420 pp.

Biography of the U.S. senator from Texas (1863-1929), who was born in Crystal Springs (Copiah Co.) and was briefly an attorney and minor political figure in Hazelhurst before moving to Texas in 1885.


Adams, Holmes. "Writers of Greenville, Mississippi, 1915-1958." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 3 (Aug. 1970): 229-43.

Brief survey of Greenville (Washington Co.) writers, including Caroline Stern, David Cohn, William Alexander Percy, Hodding Carter, Ben Wasson, and Shelby Foote.


Adams, Horace. "Military Operations In and Around Jackson, Mississippi, During the Civil War." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1950.

Recounts federal occupation and siege of Jackson (Hinds Co.), further railroad destruction around the city during the Meridian (Lauderdale Co.) Campaign, 1963-64, and the operation to destroy the temporary bridge across the Pearl River.


Adams, Rita Grace. "Brigadier-General John Adams, C.S.A.: Biography of a Frontier American (1825-1864)." Ph.D. dissertation, St. Louis University, 1964. 213 l.

Includes information about Adams's command of posts in Columbus (Lowndes Co.) and Jackson (Hinds Co.) during the Civil War.


Adams, Samuel B. "The Yazoo Fraud." Georgia Historical Quarterly 7, no. 2 (June 1923): 155-65.

Sale of land in much of present-day Mississippi and Alabama by Georgia legislators to four companies simultaneously, 1795; U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Fletcher v. Peck (1810) grew out of the ensuing controversy.


Adamson, Christopher R. "Punishment After Slavery: Southern State Penal Systems, 1865-1890." Social Problems 30, no. 5 (June 1983): 555-69.

Argues that the convict lease system that developed after the Civil War effectively continued slavery; mentions "pig" laws passed in Mississippi to increase severity of punishments, the building of the Gulf and Ship Island Railroad by convict labor, and fortunes made by speculators Edmund Richardson and Jones Hamilton with convict labor.


Ader, Emile B. The Dixiecrat Movement: Its Role in Third Party Politics. Washington: Public Affairs, 1955. 24 pp.

Brief look at the genesis and demise the States' Rights Party of 1948.


Adkins, Howard Glenn. "The Historical Geography of Extinct Towns in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Tennessee, 1972. 243 l.

Discusses reasons-primarily the decline of cotton cultivation and the over-harvesting of timberlands-for extinction of 262 Mississippi towns, 1830-1969.


Aiken, Charles S. The Cotton Plantation South since the Civil War. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1998. xvii, 452 pp.

Geographer traces agricultural and social changes in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, 1865-1970; see especially discussion of the rise and fall of the plantation in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta and of the strategies and effects of the civil rights movement in Mississippi.


Aiken, Charles Shelton. "Transitional Plantation Occupance in Tate County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Georgia, 1962. 115 l.

Documents the changing nature of agriculture in the county; includes some historical statistics.


Aikman, John David. "Mount Ararat: A Study of the Development of a Natchez Area Plantation." M.A. thesis, Stephen F. Austin State College, 1963. 103 l.

Follows the history of the Jefferson County plantation from its establishment in 1807 by James T. Magruder, through its postbellum decline, to its rebirth after 1913 as a successful farm, still owned by direct descendants of the original owner.


Albrecht, Andrew C. "Indian-French Relations at Natchez." American Anthropologist 48, no. 3 (July-Sept. 1946): 321-54.

Maintains that some acculturation of Native Americans to French ways probably took place during the period 1682-1730.


Albrecht, Andrew C. "The Location of the Historic Natchez Villages." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 2 (Apr. 1944): 67-88.

Evaluates conflicting documentary, cartographical, archaeological, and ethno-historical data concerning location of Natchez Indian settlements, 1982-1729.


Alcorn County Historical Association. The History of Alcorn County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: National ShareGraphics, 1983. vii, 645 pp.

Includes history of Old Tishomingo County, early settlers, Native Americans, Civil War and Reconstruction, industry, clubs, churches, schools, and towns (especially Corinth); bulk of the volume comprised of family histories.


Alden, John Richard. John Stuart and the Southern Colonial Frontier: A Study of Indian Relations, War, Trade, and Land Problems in the Southern Wilderness, 1754-1775. Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan Press, 1944. xiv, 384 pp.

See chapter eighteen, "Indian Affairs in the West Florida Area, 1768-75."


Aldrich, William F. Fox Conner. Carlisle Barracks, Pa.: U.S. Army War College, 1993.

41 pp.

Career of Major General Conner (1874-1951) of Calhoun County; emphasizes his role as mentor to World War II-era military leaders.


Aldridge, Martha Jean. "The Founding of Blue Mountain College." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Iowa, 1994. 179 l.

Establishment of the Baptist women's college in Tippah County by Confederate general Mark Perrin Lowry, 1873.


Alexander, Charles Carlisle. "A History of State-Banking in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1931. 165 l.

Nineteenth-century banking, including charters of the Planters' Bank and Union Bank, effects of the Panic of 1837, bank failures, and repudiation of bank bonds.


Alexander, Florence D. "The Education of Negroes in Mississippi." Journal of Negro Education 16, no. 3 (Summer 1947): 375-80.

Statistical information on African American elementary, secondary, trade, and vocational schools as compared to their white counterparts, 1944-45.


Alexander, Mary Ellen. Rosalie and Radishes: A History of Long Beach, Mississippi.

Gulfport, Miss.: Dixie, 1980. viii, 130 pp.

Covers settlement, incorporation, government institutions, churches, organizations, and the railroad.


Alford, Carrie Ann. "Founders' Square and the Neshoba County Fair: Some Roots of Southern Hospitality." Mississippi Folklore Register 19, no. 2 (Fall 1985): 67-70.

Very brief history of the fair from its beginnings in 1889.


Alford, Terry. "'Attention White People!: The Underground Press in Mississippi, 1962-1968." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 2 (May 1987): 139-51.

Finds that anonymous publications harassing Mississippi integrationists originated from a variety of individuals and organizations; focuses on the Rebel Underground, circulated at the University of Mississippi in 1962.


Alford, Terry. Prince Among Slaves. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1977. xx, 284 pp.

Life of Abd al-Rahman Ibrahima, Prince of Fulbe (1762-1829), who returned to his native West Africa after twenty-six years as the slave of planter Thomas Foster of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Alford, Terry L. "Slavery and Christian Conscience: The Case of Edward Brett Randolph of Mississippi." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 3, no. 1 (Dec. 1969): 10-13.

Relates the 1835 conversion experience of Randolph, owner of Goshen plantation in Lowndes County, who manumitted his twenty-one slaves and sent them to Liberia in 1836.


Alfriend, Frank H. The Life of Jefferson Davis. Cincinnati and Chicago: Caxton, 1868. xvii, 645 pp.

Early partisan biography by the former editor of the Southern Literary Messenger.


Allard, Michael A. "A History of the Clinton Prisoner of War Camp, 1942-1946." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1994. vii, 143 l.

Details camp life and organization of Camp Clinton (Hinds Co.), which housed three thousand German prisoners who helped construct the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Mississippi River Basin Flood Model flood control project.


Allen, Garvin H. "The History of Adult Education in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1938. vi, 62 l.

Evaluates New Deal literacy program.


Allen, Tip H., Jr., and Dale A. Krane. "Class Replaces Race: The Reemergence of Neopopulism in Mississippi." Southern Studies 19, no. 2 (Summer 1980): 182-92.

Reviews the changing emphases in gubernatorial campaigns of the twentieth century, culminating in the election of the first two populists-William Waller and Cliff Finch-since World War II; includes tables of socio-economic correlates and Democratic support by county.


Allen, Tip H., Jr. "Mississippi Nationalism in the Desegregation Crisis of September 1962." Canadian Review of Studies in Nationalism 14, no. 1 (Spring 1987): 49-63.

Argues that events surrounding the admission of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi reveal that Mississippi effectively functioned as a separate nation within a nation.


Alonzo, Frank O. "The History of the Mississippi Youth Court System." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 2 (May 1977): 133-53.

Reveals the sources of the state's "hodgepodge" youth court system, 1916-75.


Alvis, Joel L., Jr. "Racial Turmoil and Religious Reaction: The Rt. Rev. John M. Allin." Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church 50, no. 1 (March 1981): 83-96.

Assesses the effectiveness of Allin as bishop of the Diocese of Mississippi during the civil rights movement, 1961-74; based on the author's M.A. thesis, "John Maury Allin: Sixth Bishop of Mississippi and Twenty-Third Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church," University of Mississippi, 1980, which also examines the controversial choice of Allin to head the national church.


Ambrose, Douglas. Henry Hughes and Proslavery Thought in the Old South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Univ. Press, 1996. Southern Biography Series. xiv, 226 pp.

Biography of Hughes (1828-62) of Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), author of Treatise on Sociology (1854); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Man for Times Coming: The Life and Thought of Henry Hughes," State University of New York at Binghamton, 1991.


Ambrose, Stephen E. Struggle for Vicksburg: The Battles and Siege That Decided the Civil War. Harrisburg, Pa.: Stackpole, 1967. 66pp.

Civil War Times Illustrated commissioned this brief, heavily illustrated account of the Vicksburg Campaign, 1862-63, for young readers.


Ames, Blanche Ames. Adelbert Ames, 1835-1933, General, Senator, Governor: The Story of His Life and Times and His Integrity as a Soldier and Statesman in the Service of the United States of America throughout the Civil War and in Mississippi in the Years of Reconstruction. New York: Argosy-Antiquarian, 1964. xxiii, 625 pp.

Sympathetic biography by the daughter of Reconstruction governor Ames, who was forced from office in 1875; includes exchange of letters with President John F. Kennedy, whom Mrs. Ames accused of unfairly portraying her father in the L.Q.C. Lamar chapter of Profiles in Courage.


Anderson, C.L. A History of Telephone Pioneering in Mississippi. Fulton, Miss.: Itawamba County Times, n.d. xi, 199 pp.

History of the club, 1911-67, which admitted persons who had worked for more than twenty-one years in the telephone industry.


Anderson, John Q. "Dr. James Green Carson, Ante-Bellum Planter of Mississippi and Louisiana." Journal of Mississippi History 18, no. 4 (Oct. 1956): 243-67.

Difficulties encountered by Carson and his wife of Cane Brake Plantation (Adams Co.) when they decided to free their slaves.


Anderson, Jolane Springston. "Lamar County Place Names: Land Features and Water Bodies." Mississippi Folklore Register 15, no. 1 (Spring 1981): 1-12.

Nomenclature of geographical features of the county.


Anderson, Jolane Springston. "The Naming of Streets in Purvis, Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 21, nos. 1 & 2 (Spring/Fall 1987): 89-106.

Brief history of Purvis (Lamar Co.) and a list of street names and their origins.


Anderson, Mrs. William Albert. "A Chapter in the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1878." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 223-36.

Narrative of the epidemic in Holly Springs (Marshall Co.) based on two contemporary accounts, including one by novelist Sherwood Bonner.


Anderson, Nancy Scott. "Varina Howell Davis: At Home in Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 4 (Nov. 1992): 349-64.

Sketch of the early life of the second wife (1826-1905) of Confederate president Jefferson Davis offers insights into the sources of her often troubled personal relationships.


Anderson, Rachel Roach. "A History of Madison County, Mississippi, from Its Earliest Times Through the Civil War." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1967. iii, 115 l.

Covers geography, Native Americans, early white settlement, slavery and the plantation system, the economy, social and cultural life, and the Civil War.


Anderson, Reuben V. "Jack H. Young-A Legacy of Inspiration." Mississippi Lawyer 33, no. 5 (Mar./Apr. 1987): 18-19.

Brief sketch of Young (1908-76), African American attorney who defended "sit-in" students in Jackson (Hinds Co.), 1961-62, and served as general counsel for the Mississippi chapter of the NAACP.


"Andrew Marschalk and Andrew Marschalk, the Son." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 28 (Dec. 1983): 4-7.

Marschalk (1767-1838) was Mississippi's first printer, and his son owned the Macon Herald (Noxubee Co.).


Andrews, Kenneth Tait. "'Freedom Is a Constant Struggle': The Dynamics and Consequences of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement, 1960-1984." Ph.D. dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1997. 377 l.

Case study of the impact of social movements finds that the locally-based Mississippi movement had long-lasting institutional effects.


Aptheker, Herbert. "Mississippi Reconstruction and the Negro Leader, Charles Caldwell." Science and Society 11 (Fall 1947): 340-71.

Role of Republican Caldwell (d. 1875) in Clinton and Hinds County Reconstruction politics; reprinted in the author's collection, To Be Free: Studies in American Negro History (New York: International, 1968).


Aptheker, Herbert. "Negro Casualties in the Civil War." Journal of Negro History 32, no. 1 (Jan. 1947): 10-80.

Cites death statistics and locates engagements of African American troops, including the 1st Mississippi Regiment of Colored Infantry, 3rd U.S. Colored Cavalry, and 1st Mississippi Volunteers of African Descent, and examines brutality toward African American Union troops in Mississippi.


Aptheker, Herbert. "Notes on Slave Conspiracies in Confederate Mississippi." Journal of Negro History 29, no. 1 (Jan. 1944): 75-79.

Notes omissions in John K. Bettersworth's Confederate Mississippi (1943), published in the same year as Aptheker's American Negro Slave Revolts; mentions a 1862 slave conspiracy in Adams County which was later investigated by Winthrop D. Jordan.


Ardoin, Birthney. "A Content Analysis of Mississippi Daily Newspaper Coverage of the Waller-Evers Political Campaign." Southern Quarterly 11, no. 3 (Apr. 1973): 207-20.

Examines twenty newspapers from mid-October to November 2, 1971, to determine the extent of campaign coverage bias in the gubernatorial race between William Waller and Charles Evers.


Armstrong, Helen Potts. "Public Welfare and Private Programs Administered in Natchez and Adams County, Mississippi, 1798-1822." M.A. thesis, University of Chicago, 1943. 143+ l.

Covers colonization, early government, and provisions for social welfare, public health, and services for dependent children.


Armstrong, James Edgar. "Henry Stuart Foote: Mississippi Career, 1830-1860." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1948. v, 90 l.

Study of the career of Foote (1804-80) as state legislator, governor, and U.S. senator demonstrates the depth of anti-secession feeling in the state.


Armstrong, Margaret. "James Zachariah George: Champion of White Supremacy." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1938. 94 l.

Sympathetic biographical study of U.S. senator George (1826-97).


Armstrong, Walter P. "'Private' John Allen: A Lawyer Who Had 'The Saving Grace.'" American Bar Association Journal 33, no. 3 (Oct. 1947): 990-94.

Sketch of Allen (1846-1917), Tupelo (Lee Co.) lawyer, district attorney, and eight-term congressman who is remembered for his humor.


Arnold, William E. "An Analysis of Some Speeches of Jefferson Davis." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 4 (Nov. 1971): 351-55.

Emphasizes Davis's stands on states' rights, state sovereignty, and free trade in speeches delivered between 1853 and 1861.


Arrington, Leonard J. "Mississippi Mormons." Ensign 7 (June 1977): 46-51.

Fourteen Monroe County families led by William Crosby established Mormon settlements in Holladay, Utah in 1848 and San Bernardino, California, in 1851.


Arsenault, Raymond. "The End of the Long Hot Summer: The Air Conditioner and Southern Culture." Journal of Southern History 50, no 4 (Nov. 1984): 597-628.

Examines the social and cultural significance of air conditioning on the region, 1920s-1950s; mentions writer William Faulkner of Oxford (Lafayette Co.) and includes a table of total Mississippi and African American Mississippi households with air conditioning.


Arvey, Verna. In One Lifetime. Fayettteville: Univ. of Arkansas Press, 1984. xii, 280 pp.

Biography of African American composer William Grant Still (1895-1978).


Ashley, Eleanor Lynch. "Water, Water Everywhere." Journal of Monroe County History 9 (1983): 3-5.

Brief history of the Aberdeen Water Works.


Ashley, John. Mississippi Life: Past and Present. Brandon, Miss.: Magnolia, 1987. 146 pp.

School textbook.


Ates, Diane. "Parallels to the Folklore of Smith County, Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 11, no. 1 (Spring 1977): 56-63.

Compares Smith County and British folklore and superstitions.


Atkinson, James R. "The Ackia and Ogoula Tchetoka Chickasaw Village Locations in 1736 During the French-Chickasaw War." Mississippi Archaeology 20, no. 1 (June 1985): 53-72.

Uses archaeological and historical evidence to place two battle sites in Lee County and to locate several Chickasaw villages.


Atkinson, James R. The Bolls Site: An Early American Period Occupation on the Natchez Trace, Old Natchez District, Adams County, Mississippi. Tallahassee, Fla.: Southeast Archaeological Center, National Park Service, 1987. ii, 36 pp.

Describes homestead found while constructing the Natchez Trace Parkway.


Atkinson, James R. "The De Soto Expedition Through North Mississippi in 1540-41." Mississippi Archaeology 22, no. 1 (June 1987): 61-73.

Locates villages of Chickasaw, Chakchiuma, and Alabama Indians encountered by the Hernando de Soto expedition in present-day Clay, Chickasaw, Oktibbeha, Webster, and Lowndes counties.


Atkinson, James. "A History of Chickasaw County, Mississippi, to the Civil War." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 2, no. 2 (Dec. 1969): 3-60.

Covers Native Americans, county organization, transportation, cotton cultivation, slavery, religion, education, and politics; reprints the author's M.A. thesis of the same title, Mississippi State University, 1968.


Atkinson, James R., ed. "A History of Chickasaw County, by Tim Turpentine." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 4 (Nov. 1979): 319-33.

Articles that appeared in the Houston Petrel in 1858 relate history based largely on county court records later destroyed when Union troops burned the Chickasaw County courthouse.


Ayers, Edward L. Vengeance and Justice: Crime and Punishment in the Nineteenth-Century American South. New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1984. ix, 353 pp.

Includes material on penitentiaries, the uses and abuses of the convict lease system in Mississippi, 1870s-1880s, and the system's eventual abolition in favor of the prison farm in the 1890s; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Crime and Society in the Nineteenth-Century South," Yale University, 1980.


Bacon, Charles Madison. "A History of Hinds County, Mississippi, During Reconstruction, 1865-1875." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1959. iv, 95 l.

Traditional account emphasizes economic conditions and politics.


Bacon, John P., Jr. "A History of Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of Southern Mississippi, 1912-1949." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1967. v, 134 l.

Examines football, basketball, and baseball programs.


Badger, Andrew. "A Brief History of the Choctaw Language." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no 1 (Feb. 1978): 49-59.

Traces events that have affected the Choctaw people and their language and comments on its importance as the trade language of the Southeast before the advent of European settlers.


Baer, Charles Howard. "The New Black Politics in Mississippi: A Quantitative Analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, Northwestern University, 1970. 235 l.

Study of African American political participation in the 1960s finds federal intervention to have been most effective in increasing voting levels.


Baggett, Antrece Lynette. "A History of the Political, Social and Financial Struggle to Establish and Sustain the Teacher Training Program at Jackson State University, 1877-1970." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1995. 103 l.

Institutional history of the program in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Bahr, Howard L., and William K. Duke. "The Wet August: Andrew J. Smith's Mississippi Campaign." Civil War Times Illustrated 16, no. 7 (Nov. 1977): 10-19.

Describes Union commander Smith's attempts to engage Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest in Mississippi and to keep him away from the Atlanta Campaign in 1864; sketches the Battle of Hurricane Creek and the burning of the town square and railroad depot in Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Bailey, Ben E. "The Minstrel Show in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no 2 (Summer 1995): 139-52.

Reviews the history of minstrelsy with mentions of shows and performers in Mississippi, including blues singers Gertrude "Ma" Rainey (1886-1939), Bessie Smith (1894-1937), Clarence "Gatemouth" Moore (b. 1913), and others.


Bailey, Ben E. "Music in Slave Era Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 1 (Feb. 1992): 29-58.

Overview of African American music, including spirituals, work songs, dance music, and instruments played by slaves; mentions concert singer Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, the "Black Swan" (1817-76).


Bailey, Ben E. "The Red Tops: The Orchestra That Covered the Delta." Black Perspective in Music 16, no 2 (Fall 1988): 177-90.

Describes the musical milieu of turn-of-the-century Vicksburg (Warren Co.) and the prominence through the mid-twentieth century of African American musicians in brass bands and dance music groups; focuses on the Red Tops, a popular band of the 1950s.


Bailey, David T. Shadow on the Church: Southwestern Evangelical Religion and the Issue of Slavery, 1783-1860. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell Univ. Press, 1985. 393 pp.

Examines the relationship between evangelical churches and the institution of slavery in the Old Southwest (Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, and Mississippi), including antislavery in the Great Revival, slave participation in churches, the role of moral reformers, and the intraregional split over slavery; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Slavery and the Churches: The Old Southwest," University of California, Berkeley, 1979.


Bailey, Robert J. "The Gubernatorial Administration of George Poindexter, 1820-1822." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 3 (Aug. 1973): 227-46.

Tempestuous life and career of Poindexter (1779-1853), focusing on his relatively peaceful term as the second governor of the state.


Bailey, Robert J. "Theodore G. Bilbo: Prelude to a Senate Career, 1932-1934." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1971. iv, 95 l.

Chronicles the years between his tenures as governor and U.S. senator; emphasizing his "progressivism."


Bailey, Robert. "Theodore G. Bilbo and the Senatorial Election of 1934." Southern Quarterly 10, no. 1 (Oct. 1971): 91-105.

Detailed populist campaign that returned the former governor to political power after a two-year hiatus.


Bailey, Robert J. "Theodore G. Bilbo and the Fair Employment Practices Controversy: A Southern Senator's Reaction to a Changing World." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 1 (Feb. 1980): 27-42.

Bilbo's successful 1945 filibuster to prevent further funding of the FEPC, which would have continued President Franklin D. Roosevelt's wartime policy of guaranteeing minority access to the workplace.


Bailey, Thomas J. Prohibition in Mississippi, or Anti-Liquor Legislation from Territorial Days, with Its Results in the Counties. Jackson, Miss.: the author, 1917. iii, 227 pp.

History of temperance efforts in the state beginning in 1798, written by the superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Mississippi.


Baird, W. David. The Chickasaw People. Phoenix: Indian Tribal Series, 1974. 104 pp.

Brief history of the Chickasaw people in the South Central states and in Oklahoma.


Baird, W. David. The Choctaw People. Phoenix: Indian Tribal Series, 1973. 106 pp.

Brief history of the Choctaw people in Mississippi and Oklahoma.


Baird, W. David. Peter Pitchlynn: Chief of the Choctaws. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1972. xix, 238 pp.

Biography of the mixed-blood chief (1806-81) whose tenure spanned the removal period, but only the first two chapters deal with the man and his Mississippi ancestors; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Peter Pitchlynn: Choctaw Delegate," University of Oklahoma, 1968.


Baker, Bill R. Catch the Vision: The Life of Henry L. Whitfield of Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1974. x, 173 pp.

Life of Whitfield (1868-1927), governor of Mississippi, president of the Industrial Institute and College (M.U.W.), and state superintendent of education; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Mississippi State University, 1973.


Baker, Henry E. "The Negro in the Field of Invention." Journal of Negro History 2, no. 1 (Jan. 1917): 21-36.

Mentions the inventor of a boat propeller, Benjamin T. Montgomery (d. 1877), a slave on Jefferson Davis's plantation and the father of Isaiah T. Montgomery (1847-1924), founder of the African American community of Mound Bayou (Bolivar Co.).


Baker, Lewis. The Percys of Mississippi: Politics and Literature in the New South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1983. 237 pp.

Focuses on Senator LeRoy Percy (1860-1929), writers William Alexander Percy (1885-1942) and Walker Percy (1916-90), and Colonel William Alexander Percy, describing "recurring themes in the family's history"; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Louisiana State University, 1981, and on his master's thesis, "Leroy Percy, Delta Defender," Louisiana State University, 1977.


Baker, Webster B. History of Rust College. Greensboro, N.C.: the author, 1924. vii, 221 pp.

History of the historically-black college in Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), founded by the Freedmen's Aid Society in 1868; includes biographical sketches of college leaders.


Ballard, Michael B. The Battle of Tupelo: A Scholarly Monograph. Murphreesboro, Tenn.: Southern Heritage Press for the Blue and Gray Society, 1996. 57 [6] pp.

Analyzes leadership and strategy of the 1864 battle in present-day Lee County.


Ballard, Michael B. The Campaign for Vicksburg. [Conshohocken, Penn.]: Eastern National Park and Monument Association, 1996. 55 pp.

Heavily illustrated account of the 1862-63 battle in Warren County.


Ballard, Michael B. "Editorial Opinions of Jefferson Davis during the Civil War." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1976. 149 l.

Follows evolving estimations of Davis by northern and southern newspaper editors.


Ballard, Michael B. Photographs by David Muench. Landscapes of Battle: The Civil War. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1988. xvii, 141 pp.

Includes photographs of Vicksburg.


Ballard, Michael B. A Long Shadow: Jefferson Davis and the Final Days of the Confederacy. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1986. xi, 200 pp.

Detailed examination of the first five months of the 1865 (Davis's refusal to concede defeat, his retreat from Richmond, and his capture and imprisonment) seeks to explain the subsequent canonization of Davis as the symbol of the "lost cause"; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Mississippi State University, 1983.


Ballard, Michael B. Pemberton: A Biography. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1991. xiii, 250 pp.

Life of Confederate general John Clifford Pemberton (1814-81) analyzes his administrative abilities and blames his failure to defend Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1863 on his indecisive leadership.


Balsamo, Larry Thomas. "Theodore G. Bilbo and Mississippi Politics, 1877-1932." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Missouri, 1967. 288 l.

Characterizes Bilbo, James K. Vardaman's successor as leader of the "redneck" faction of the state's Democratic Party, as a progressive; does not address Bilbo's racial views.


Baradell, William Lang. "Runaway Slaves in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1974. 98 l.

Assesses reasons for flight, likelihood of capture, and extent of punishment; finds that the typical runaway was a male field hand in his teens or early twenties.


Barbee, David Rankin. "The Capture of Jefferson Davis." Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 29 (July 1947): 6-42.

Detailed refutation of the story that Confederate president Davis was captured in Georgia in 1865 disguised in women's clothes.


Barbee, David Rankin. "Dr. Craven's Prison Life of Jefferson Davis: An Expose." Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 33 (Apr. 1951): [14 pp.].

Controversy surrounding the 1866 publication of the book by Davis's physician; article claims the book to have been a fraud, written by Colonel Charles G. Halpine to spur Davis's early parole.


Bardsley, Virginia O. "James Rogan: Hill Country Pioneer." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1961. vi, 235 l.

Biography of Probate Court judge Rogan (1797-1885) of Tippah County.


Barham, Betty. "A History of Meridian, Mississippi, 1860-1917." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1970. iv, 76 l.

Emphasis on the Progressive Era, including public health measures, trusts, race relations, the tornado of 1906, cultural life, education, and World War I.


Barlow, William B. "Looking Up at Down": Blues Culture until World War II. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1989. xii, 404 pp.

Traces the progression of blues culture, 1890s-1940s, from its origin in the rural South (including the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta) to the urban North and examines the influence of the blues on post-World War II musical forms; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Voices from the Heartland: A Cultural History of the Blues," University of California, Santa Cruz, 1983.


Barner, W.G. Mississippi Mayhem. West Point, N.Y.: Leisure, 1982. 426 pp.

Follows "one of the fiercest football rivalries in the South," University of Mississippi versus Mississippi State University, 1900-80.


Barnes, Catherine A. Journey from Jim Crow: The Desegregation of Southern Transit. N.Y.: Columbia University Press, 1983. xi, 313 pp.

Demonstrates the importance of federal intervention in the history of transit, the first public accommodation to be thoroughly desegregated; includes account of the Freedom Riders in Mississippi; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Columbia University, 1981.


Barnes, Irene, comp. Eastport: Echoes of the Past. Iuka, Miss.: the author, 1983. 112 pp.

Collection of vignettes and documents on the Tishomingo County town.


Barnes, James Franklin. "Negro Voting in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1955. 65 l.

Historical overview (Reconstruction voting, disfranchisement in the Constitution of 1890, and the small increase in suffrage after the turn of the century) followed by vote analysis.


Barnes, Louie Burton, III. "The Embattled Judges: Cox, Mize, and Cameron, 1960-65." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1974. 118 l.

Criticism faced by conservative federal judges Harold Cox, Sydney Mize, and Benjamin F. Cameron for their stands in civil rights cases.


Barnett, James F., Jr. "The Natchez Indians and the Trace." Southern Quarterly 29, no 4 (Summer 1991): 17-20.

Discusses the Natchez Trace's origin as a Native American trail and its appropriation by European colonists in the eighteenth century.


Barney, William L. The Secessionist Impulse: Alabama and Mississippi in 1860. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1974. xv, 371 pp

Largely quantitative study of local political leadership and voting behavior explains how the victorious Breckinridge faction of the Democratic Party led Alabama and Mississippi out of the Union and why the Bell and Douglas factions were more reluctant to encourage secession.


Barrett, Russell H. Integration at Ole Miss. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1965. 270 pp.

Account by a faculty member of the violent conflict over the admission of James Meredith, the first African American student at the University of Mississippi.


Barrow, Deborah J., and Thomas G. Walker. A Court Divided: The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals and the Politics of Judicial Reform. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1988. xiv, 274 pp.

Legal and political wrangling over division of the busy Fifth Circuit, which handled most of the important civil rights cases of the 1960s, into the Fifth (Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi) and the Eleventh (Florida, Georgia, Alabama) circuits; chapter two, "The Trial of Civil Rights," includes material on the Freedom Riders, voting rights, and the integration of the University of Mississippi.


Barry, John. Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1997. 524 pp.

Sweeping narrative of the flood, its legacy, and the history of engineering efforts to control the river; Senator LeRoy Percy and his son, writer William Alexander Percy, figure largely in the story. Book won the Parkman and McLemore prizes and the Lillian Smith Award.


Bartels, R. Lee. "Lawyer and Judge." American Lawyer 12, no. 8 (Aug. 1984): 349-52.

Legal and judicial career of L.Q.C. Lamar, 1849-93.


Bartley, Numan V. The New South, 1945-1980. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995. Vol. 11 of The History of the South. xiii, 548 pp.

Part of chapter ten, "Conflict, Consensus, and Civil Rights," deals with the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer project, the organization of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, and the genesis of Black Power at the 1966 Meredith March.


Baskin, Bethany Lamar. "The Rise of William Forrest Winter." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1992. iii, 111 l.

Examines political career of Winter (b. 1923) as legislator, tax collector, state treasurer, lieutenant governor, and governor.


Bass, Jack, and Walter DeVries. The Transformation of Southern Politics: Social Change and Political Consequences since 1945. N.Y.: Basic Books, 1976. xi, 527 pp.

Updates V.O. Key's assessment of the southern political landscape, employing similar methodology; chapter nine, "Mississippi: Out of the Past," examines historical antecedents for the state's racist image, reviews events of the civil rights movement, describes the political consequences of African American voting, and follows changing political alignments since 1948.


Bass, Mary Frances. "A Study of Place-Names of Clarke County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1941. xvi, 173 l.

Linguistic analysis of names of institutions, bodies of water, and communities.


Bassett, Anel Darvel. "A Social and Economic History of Kemper County, Mississippi, in the Ante-Bellum Period." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1947. 110 l.

Covers establishment of the county, its early history and settlers, economy, agriculture, religion, education, social events, newspapers, medicine, and politics.


[Bassett, John Spencer]. "How a Young Man Built Up History in Mississippi." South Atlantic Quarterly 1, no. 4 (Oct. 1902): 372-77.

Early accomplishments of Franklin L. Riley, who became professor history at the University of Mississippi in 1897, revived the state historical society and established the state historical journal and the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.


Bassett, John Spencer. The Southern Plantation Overseer as Revealed in His Letters. Northampton, Mass.: Smith College, 1925. vii, 280 pp.

Experience of overseers on plantations owned by President James K. Polk (1795-1849) in Fayette County, Tennessee, and Yalobusha County, Mississippi.


Bassett, Martha B. "History of Beauvoir-Jefferson Davis Shrine." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1970. ii, 111 l.

Traces deeds and describes construction of the Biloxi (Harrison Co.) house in 1852, the tenancy of the former Confederate president, 1877-89, and the conversion of the house into the Jefferson Davis Shrine, 1941.


Bassett, Mary Jane H. "The Moral and Social Attitudes of Baptists in Antebellum Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1972. 126 l.

Describes qualifications for membership; licensing of clergy; adjudication of family and community disputes; prohibitions against drinking, gambling, and dancing; and membership and attendance of slaves in white churches.


Bassham, Ben. "A Confederate Artist in Yazoo City." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 4 (Nov. 1993): 281-90.

Brief recuperative stay of Civil War artist Conrad Wise Chapman (1842-1910), a private in Company D of the Third Kentucky Regiment; article reproduces several examples of his work.


Bastian, David F. Grant's Canal: The Union's Attempt to Bypass Vicksburg. Shippensburg, Pa.: Burd Street Press, 1995. 88 pp.

Describes the unsuccessful attempt, 1862-63, to divert the Mississippi River through a man-made canal which would cut off the horseshoe bend on which Vicksburg (Warren Co.) was located.


Bauer, Mary. "Gulfport's and Biloxi's Hospitals: Their First Fifty Years." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 4 (Nov. 1977): 317-37.

Focuses particularly on King's Daughters Hospital in Gulfport and the Biloxi City Hospital (Harrison Co.), 1906-62; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, University of Southern Mississippi, 1976.


Baum, Jack. Holly Springs: The Architecture of a Small Town. Knoxville, Tenn.: the author, 1978. 123 l.

Brief descriptions and photocopied photographs of over 118 historic structures in the Marshall County town.


Bauman, Mark K., and Berkley Kalin, eds. The Quiet Voices: Southern Rabbis and Black Civil Rights, 1880s to 1990s. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1997. Judaic Studies Series. 444 pp.

Includes "Big Struggle in a Small Town: Charles Mantinband of Hattiesburg, Mississippi," by Clive Webb, and "What Price Amos? Perry Nussbaum's Career in Jackson, Mississippi," by Gary Phillip Zola.


Baxter, Anne Brady. "The Forgotten Aristocracy: Plantation Society in Jefferson and Claiborne Counties." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1986. v, 157 l.

Sympathetic narrative of the lives of planters who owned more than one hundred slaves.


Baxter, James E. "Congressional Redistricting in Mississippi from 1817 to 1938." M.A. thesis, Duke University, 1939. 225 l.

Discusses political wrangling and assesses the extent of gerrymandering in redistricting; includes many maps tracing congressional district lines.


Bay Springs Mill: Historical Archaeology of a Rural Mississippi Cotton Milling Community. Nashville, Tenn.: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, 1981. xiv, 412 pp.

Archeological report in anticipation of inundation of the defunct Tishomingo County community by construction of the Bay Springs Lock and Dam of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway.


Beals, Carlton. War Within a War: The Confederacy Against Itself. Philadelphia: Chilton Books, 1965. xi, 177 pp.

Chapter six, "Mississippi at Bay," deals with Unionist sentiment in the state, 1861-65.


Beard, Michael Francis. "Frontier Port on the Mississippi: A History of the Legend of Natchez-Under-the-Hill, 1800-1900." Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, 1981. v, 207 l.

Examines the significance of the image of the Natchez (Adams Co.) landing to the myths of the "wild and savage West" and the "Old South."


Bearss, Edwin C., and Warren Grabau. The Battle of Jackson, May 14, 1863. Baltimore: Gateway, 1981. iv, 158 pp.

Includes title essay and two other essays by Bearss: "The Siege of Jackson, July 10-17, 1863," and "Three Other Post-Vicksburg Actions" (battles at Yazoo City, Black River, and Natchez).


Bearss, Edwin C., comp. "Calendar of Events in Mississippi, 1861-1865." Journal of Mississippi History 21, no. 2 (Apr. 1959): 85-112.

Detailed calendar of Civil War actions in the state.


Bearss, Edwin C. The Campaign for Vicksburg. Dayton, Ohio: Morningside Bookshop, 1985-86. 3 vols.

Highly detailed three-volume history of the Vicksburg Campaign, 1862-63, by the former director of the Vicksburg National Military Park.


Bearss, Edwin C. Decision in Mississippi: Mississippi's Important Role in the War between the States. Jackson, Miss.: Mississippi Commission on the War Between the States, 1962. xvi, 636 pp.

Detailed account of the Civil War Battle of Champion Hill (Hinds Co.) and of the Vicksburg Campaign argues that Union victory in the war was determined by actions in those engagements.


Bearss, Edwin C., and Warren Grabau. "The Destruction of the Cairo." Journal of Mississippi History 23, no. 3 (July 1961): 141-63.

Torpedoing of the Union ironclad Cairo close to the mouth of the Yazoo River near Vicksburg, December 12, 1863, and the discovery of the wreckage by the authors ninety-six years later.


Bearss, Edwin C. Forrest at Brice's Cross Roads and in North Mississippi in 1864. Dayton, Ohio: Press of Morningside Bookshop, 1979. ix, 382 pp.

Follows Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest's campaigns from April to August, 1864, including the Battle of Brice's Cross Roads and the Battle of Tupelo (Union and Lee counties), and the thwarting of A.J. Smith's second invasion of Mississippi; includes biographical sketches of relevant Union and Confederate commanders.


Bearss, Edwin C. "Grand Gulf's Role in the Civil War." Civil War History 5, no. 1 (Mar. 1959): 5-29.

Civil War skirmishes, 1862-64, around the now-extinct shipping town in Claiborne County.


Bearss, Edwin C. "Grierson's Winter Raid on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad." Military Affairs 24, no. 2 (Spring 1960): 20-37.

Brigidier General Benjamin H. Grierson's destructive attempt to cut the chief avenue of communication and supply to the Confederate Army of Tennessee, 1864-65.


Bearss, Edwin C. Hardluck Ironclad: The Sinking and Salvage of the Cairo. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1966. xiii, 208 pp.

Building of the Union ironclad, its wartime exploits, its sinking in the Yazoo River near Vicksburg (Warren Co.) on December 12, 1862, the discovery of the wreckage in 1956, and the subsequent painstaking salvage and reassembly.


Bearss, Edwin C. "McArthur's May Expedition Against the Mississippi Central Railroad." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no 1 (Feb. 1966): 1-14.

Civil War skirmishes around Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.), 1864.


Bearss, Edwin C. "Misfire in Mississippi: McPherson's Canton Expedition." Civil War History 8, no. 4 (Dec. 1962): 401-16.

Clash at the vital railroad center of Canton (Madison Co.), October 14-20, 1863.


Bearss, Edwin C. Protecting Sherman's Lifeline: The Battles of Brice's Cross Roads and Tupelo, 1864. Washington: National Park Service, 1971. [40] pp.

Brief undocumented account of the June-July battles in present-day Union and Lee counties.


Bearss, Edwin C. Rebel Victory at Vicksburg. Vicksburg, Miss.: Vicksburg Centennial Commission, 1963. xi, 299 pp.

Detailed narrative of the failure of the first Union attempt to capture Vicksburg (Warren Co.), 1862.


Bearss, Edwin C. "Saga of a Gunboat." Delta Review 3, no. 1 (Spring 1966): 32-35, 69-73.

Recounts the history and 1862 sinking of the Union ironclad Cairo, its discovery in the Yazoo River near Vicksburg (Warren Co.), the complex dismantling and reassembly of the wreckage, and the political wrangling over funding and method of preservation.


Bearss, Edwin C. The Tupelo Campaign, June 22-July 23, 1864: A Documented Narrative and Troop Movement Maps. Washington: National Park Service, 1969. 210+ pp.

Detailed account of the Civil War campaign includes recommendations for historical markers and interpretive sites.


Bearss, Edwin E. "The Union Raid Down the Mississippi and Up the Yazoo: August 16-27, 1862." Military Affairs 26, no. 3 (Fall 1962): 108-19.

Describes Union efforts to keep the Mississippi River at Vicksburg (Warren Co.) open to Union boats but closed to Confederate troops and supplies.


Bearss, Edwin D. "The Vicksburg River Defenses and the Enigma of 'Whistling Dick.'"

Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 1 (Jan. 1957): 21-30.

Eighteen-pound rifled gun used by Vicksburg's defenders in 1863 was surrendered when the city fell to Union forces on July 4.


Bearss, Margie Riddle. Sherman's Forgotten Campaign: The Meridian Expedition. Baltimore: Gateway, for the Jackson Civil War Roundtable, 1987. x, 363 pp.

Part one, "Sherman Torches Central Mississippi in His First Use of Total Warfare," covers destruction of railroads, bridges, and the towns of Meridian (Lauderdale Co.) and Decatur (Newton Co.) in 1863-64; part two covers the Yazoo Expedition of 1864.


Beasley, Jonathan. "Blacks-Slave and Free-Vicksburg, 1850-1860." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no 1 (Feb. 1976): 1-32.

Analysis of the slave and free African American populations of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) disputes earlier findings that slavery was declining in cities by the 1950s.


Beckett, Charles Mitchell. "Choctaw Indians in Mississippi Since 1830." M.A. thesis, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1949. 81 l.

Overview of Choctaw life after removal stresses economic and educational progress encouraged by Philadelphia's Choctaw Indian Agency, established in 1918.


Beckman, L.A., Jr. History of Bethsalem Presbyterian Church, Choctaw County, Mississippi, 1839-1926. Weir, Miss.: n.p., n.d. 18 pp.

Institutional history.


Beckner, Chisanne. 100 African Americans Who Shaped American History. San Francisco: Bluewood, 1995. 112 pp.

Includes biographical sketch of writer Richard Wright (1908-69), a native of Adams County.


Bedini, Silvio A. "Andrew Ellicott, Surveyor of the Wilderness." Surveying and Mapping 36, no. 2 (June 1976): 113-35.

Includes brief account of the surveying by Ellicott (1754-1820) of the boundary between the United States and Spanish Florida, 1796-1800.


Bedwell, Randall J. "A History of the Fraternities and Sororities at Ole Miss: 1848-1930." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1991.

Societies and clubs at the University of Mississippi, 1850-1930; includes discussion of the temporary ban on fraternities from 1910 to 1926.


Beer, William. "Cartography of Mississippi in the 16th Century." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 341-43.

Very brief discussion of the Kunstmann, Norkenskjold, and Kretschmer maps.


"The Beginning of the Dairy Industry in Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 25 (Mar. 1983): 2-5.

Mentions four creameries, 1886-96.


Behel, Sandra K. "The Mississippi Home Front during World War II: Tradition and Change." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1989. 199 l.

Describes the state's halting acceptance of social change, which began when Mississippians served in the military outside the state; the employment of Mississippians in defense industries in urban areas; and the presence of prisoner-of-war camps.


Behel, Sandra Kaye. "Senator John C. Stennis and the Censure of Senator Joseph R. McCarthy." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1980. 74 l.

Discusses the membership of Stennis (1901-95) on the 1954 Watkins Committee of the U.S. Senate that recommended censure of the Wisconsin senator for his anti-Communist rhetoric and tactics.


Bekkers, B.J. "The Catholic Church in Mississippi During Colonial Times." Publications of the Mississippi History Society 6 (1902): 351-57.

Catholic missions in Mississippi from 1673 to 1790.


Belknap, Michal R. Federal Law and Southern Order: Racial Violence and Constitutional Conflict in the Post-Brown South. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1987. xv, 387 pp.

Includes material on the integration of the University of Mississippi, the murder of Medgar Evers, Freedom Summer, the Neshoba County murders, and violence in McComb (Pike Co.), Canton (Madison Co.), Greenville (Washington Co.), and other communities in the early- to mid-1960s.


Bell, Frank C. "The Life and Times of John R. Lynch: A Case Study, 1847-1939." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 1 (Feb. 1976): 53-67.

Sketch of the African American congressman emphasizes the differences between his philosophy and that of his contemporary, Booker T. Washington.


Bell, Helen D. "The History of a County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 335-42.

Brief history of Hinds County from 1820.


Bell, Jessie Lynn. "The 'Noxubee Colony' of Richland Parish, Louisiana." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 11 (Sept. 1979): 7.

Migration to Louisiana of a large number of local families, 1880s-1902.


Bell, Mary Anne. "Biloxi and Mobile, 1699-1713." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1972. vii, 97 l.

Early years of settlement.


Bell, Sharon Burnette. "Anselm Joseph Finch: Mississippian and Life Long Educator." M.A. thesis, Jackson State University, 1976. 65 l.

Biography of the African American educator (1902-69) who established Wilkinson County's first secondary school for black students in Centreville in 1948.


Bell, Willaim Dudley. "The Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi, 1866-1872." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1963. 114 l.

History of the Reconstruction-era Klan stresses its opposition to free public schools.



Benham, Evelyn. "Pearl River 'Talcatcha.'" Journal of Mississippi History 38, no 2 (May 1976):9.

Overview of the history of the Pearl River from 1699 to 1976.


Bennett, Jack Boyd. A Historic Sites Survey of Benton and Tippah Counties, Mississippi." N.p.: Northeast Mississippi Planning and Development District and Tennessee Valley Authority, 1973. [v], 26 pp., [vi].

Includes general history and survey of historical sites.


Bennett, Lerone, Jr. Black Power, U.S.A.: The Human Side of Reconstruction, 1867-1877. Chicago: Johnson, 1967. 401 pp.

See chapter four, "Democracy Comes to Mississippi."


Bennett, Richard Thomas. "A History of Simpson County, Mississippi, 1824-1962." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1962. ix, 142 l.

Includes political history and geography, climate, Native Americans, and late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century economy and society.


Benson, Harry King. "The Public Career of Adelbert Ames, 1861-1876." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Virginia, 1975. 342 l.

Argues that social forces, not official corruption, led to the 1876 overthrow of Republican rule in Mississippi; Ames (1835-1933) was provisional governor and was then elected Republican governor during Reconstruction.


Benson, Theodore Lloyd. "Planters and Hoosiers: The Development of Sectional Society in Antebellum Indiana and Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Virginia, 1990.

353 l.

Using one free and one slave state as test cases, argues that slavery created the climate for sectionalism by encouraging-or discouraging-such ideas as abolitionism and free-soilism; includes demographic analysis.


Bentley, Julius Marvin, Jr. "Financial Institutions and Economic Development in Mississippi, 1809 to 1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Tulane University, 1969. vii, 276 l.

Examines the impact of banks on the frontier economy.


Bentley, Marvin. "Incorporated Banks and the Economic of Mississippi, 1829-1837." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 4 (Nov. 1973): 381-401.

Argues that fifteen government-chartered commercial banks played an important role in the state's economic prosperity prior to the Panic of 1837.


Bentley, Marvin. "The State Bank of Mississippi: Monopoly Bank on the Frontier (1809-1830)." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no 4 (Nov. 1978): 297-318.

Finds that the bank's conservative policies limited economic development on the state's frontier and contributed to its own ultimate demise.


Berlin, Ira, and Philip D. Morgan, eds. Cultivation and Culture: Labor and the Shaping of Slave Life in the Americas. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993. viii, 388 pp.

Includes "Plantation Labor Organization and Slave Life on the Cotton Frontier: The Alabama-Mississippi Black Belt, 1815-1840," by Steven F. Miller, which examines plantation society's "formative period," when slave populations grew explosively, particularly on plantations, rather than on small farms.


Bernard, Mother M. The Story of the Sisters of Mercy in Mississippi, 1860-1930. N.Y.: P.J. Kennedy and Sons, 1931. xviii, 281 pp.1930

Founding of the Roman Catholic order in the state; churches, convents, hospitals, missions, and schools in Pass Christian and Biloxi (Harrison Co.), Jackson (Hinds Co.), Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), Meridian (Lauderdale Co.), Neshoba County, Greenville (Washington Co.), McComb (Pike Co.), and Hattiesburg (Forrest Co.); includes biographical sketches of priests and nuns.


Bernard, Harper Caldwell. The Presbyterian Church, Senatobia, Mississippi, 1848-1936. Kingsville, Tex.: Tex-Mex Printing, n.d. 20 pp.

Brief history.


Berrett, LaMar C. "History of the Southern States Mission, 1831-1861." M.A. thesis, Brigham Young University, 1960. 306 l.

Mormon proselytizing in the South, including Mississippi.


Berry, Trey. "A History of Women's Education in Mississippi, 1819-1882." Journal of Mississippi History 53, no. 4 (Nov. 1991): 303-19.

Details the establishment of over thirty private female academies prior to the existence of public higher education for women; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, University of Mississippi, 1987.


Berthoff, Roland T. "Southern Attitudes toward Immigration, 1865-1914." Journal of Southern History 17, no. 3 (Aug. 1951): 328-60.

Recounts growing hostility toward southern and eastern European immigrants; includes mention of Italian immigrants in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta and the views of U.S. senators John Sharp Williams and Leroy Percy.


Bettersworth, John K. Confederate Mississippi: The People and Policies of a Cotton State in Wartime. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1943. xi, 386 pp.

Deals with the political antecedents of the Civil War and with the economy and culture (including religion, education, literature, and newspapers) of the state in wartime; based on the author's dissertation of the same title, Duke University, 1937.


Bettersworth, John K. "'The Cow in the Front Yard': How a Land-Grant University Grew in Mississippi." Agricultural History 53, no. 1 (Jan. 1979): 62-70.

Brief overview of the history of Mississippi State University since its inception in 1878 as Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College.


Bettersworth, John K. Inventory for Greatness: A History of the Mississippi Power and Light Company. N.p., [1968]. 218 l., [lxxxi].

Business history, 1923-63.


Bettersworth, John K. "Mississippi Historiography: Research Materials and Researchers." Mississippi Quarterly 10, 3 (Summer 1957): 138-45.

Highlights neglected areas of historical research and the need for more extensive collection of primary source materials.


Bettersworth, John K. Mississippi: A History. Austin, Tex.: Steck, 1959. xi, 595 pp.

Secondary school textbook.


Bettersworth, John K. Mississippi: Yesterday and Today. Austin, Tex.: Steck-Vaughn, 1964. ix, 421 pp.

High school textbook.


Bettersworth, John K. "Mississippi State University: A Centennial Sketch." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 1 (Feb. 1979): 33-52.

First hundred years of the school's history, including development of programs, racial integration of the institution, sports programs, and administrators.


Bettersworth, John K. People's College: A History of Mississippi State. University: University of Alabama Press, 1953. xi, 471 pp.

Institutional history, revised and retitled in the university's centennial year of 1978 as People's University (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi). xi, 471.


Bettersworth, John K. "The Urbane Bourbon." Mississippi Quarterly 10, no 2 (Spring 1957): 79-88.

Describes a sophisticated antebellum planter class that had declined by the 1890s as a result of the rise of the yeoman class.


Bettersworth, John K. "The World at the Birth of a State." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 293-300.

Context of world history in 1817.


Betts, Leonidas Judd, Jr. "George Frederick Holmes: A Critical Biography of a Nineteenth Century Southern Educator." Ed.D. dissertation, DukeUniversity, 1966. xviii, 132 l.

Life of Holmes (1820-97), the first president of the University of Mississippi.


Betts, Leonidas. "George Frederick Holmes, Nineteenth-Century Virginia Educator." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 76, no. 4 (Oct. 1968): 472-84.

Includes section on Holmes's brief and controversial tenure as the first president of the University of Mississippi, 1848-49.


Bezzerides, A.I. William Faulkner: A Life on Paper. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi in cooperation with the Mississippi Authority for Educational Television, 1980. 125 pp.

Script of the film of the same title, 1979.


Bibliography of Theses Written at Mississippi State College Between 1901 and 1952 and Catalogued in the College Library. State College: Graduate School, Mississippi State College, 1953. 35 pp.

Reference work.


Bigelow, Martha. "Mississippi Progressivism." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no 3 (Aug. 1967): 202-209.

Maintains that state Senator Edmund F. Noel, later governor, was the first Mississippi progressive; cites his sponsorship of the 1902 Direct Primary Law, which predated by one year Wisconsin's similar legislation.


Bigelow, Martha Mitchell. "Public Opinion and the Passage of the Mississippi Black Codes." Negro History Bulletin 33, no 1 (Jan. 1970): 11-16.

Argues that the Reconstruction Black Codes were passed chiefly to prevent freedmen from testifying in court.


Bigelow, Martha M. "The Significance of Milliken's Bend in the Civil War." Journal of Negro History 45, no. 3 (July 1960): 156-63.

Located fifteen miles upriver from Vicksburg, Milliken's Bend (Warren Co.) was the launching point for Sherman's unsuccessful 1862 attack on Vicksburg and served as General U.S. Grant's headquarters during the 1863 siege.


Bigelow, Martha Mitchell. "Vicksburg: Experiment in Freedom." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no 1 (Feb. 1964): 28-44.

Lives of Vicksburg area slaves freed by federal troops, 1863-65.


Billington, Monroe. "The Political Apprenticeship of Thomas P. Gore." Mississippi Quarterly 11, no. 3 (Summer 1958): 141-50.

Origin of progressive views of Gore (1870-1949), U.S. senator from Oklahoma who grew up in Choctaw and Webster counties, Mississippi; Gore's grandson is writer Gore Vidal.


Billington, Monroe Lee. Thomas P. Gore: The Blind Senator from Oklahoma. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1967. 229 pp.

Life of Gore (1870-1949), progressive U.S. senator from Oklahoma who was reared in Choctaw and Webster counties, Mississippi; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Thomas P. Gore: Oklahoma's Blind Senator," University of Kentucky, 1955.


Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Mississippi: Embracing an Authentic and Comprehensive Account of the Chief Events in the History of the State, and a Record of the Lives of Many of the Most Worthy and Illustrious Families and Individuals. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1891. 2 vols.

A "who's who" of nineteenth-century Mississippi.


Bishop, Billy M. "Public Education in Mississippi, 1910-1954." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1963. 101 l.

Includes information on the state textbook commission, school consolidation, junior colleges and vocational schools, compulsory attendance, and education of African American children.


Black, Earl. Southern Governors and Civil Rights: Racial Segregation as a Campaign Issue in the Second Reconstruction. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1976. xiv, 408 pp.

Quantitative political study examines commitment to segregation of southern governors as revealed in their campaigns since the early 1950s; evaluates Mississippi governors Hugh White, J.P. Coleman, Ross Barnett, Paul Johnson, John Bell Williams, and William Waller.


Black, Earl. "A Theory of Southern Factionalism." Journal of Politics 45, no. 3 (1983): 594-614.

Statistical information on Mississippi primaries, 1920-80, confirming V.O. Key's characterization of Mississippi political parties as multifactional.


Black, Henry. "A Spear of Hell: The Tupelo Tornado of 1936." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 3 (Aug. 1976): 263-78.

Describes personal and property damage and the speedy rebuilding of the city thanks to New Deal agencies.


Black, Patti Carr. Art in Mississippi, 1720-1980. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1998. 359 pp.

Heavily illustrated volume includes chapters on Native Americans, architecture, photography, folk art, modernism, the civil rights movement, and more.


Black, Patti Carr, ed. Mules and Mississippi. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives of History, 1980. 64 pp.

Heavily illustrated exhibition catalog includes essays by William R. Ferris and Betty Carter.


Black, Patti Carr, ed. Persistence of Pattern in Mississippi Choctaw Culture. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1988. 44 pp.

Exhibition catalog includes two articles, "The Mississippi Choctaws: A Pattern of Persistence," by John H. Peterson, and "Something Tells Me This Feeling about the Land is the Old Choctaw Religion: The Persistence of Choctaw Culture in Mississippi since 1830,' by Cheri L. Wolfe.


Blackmun, Harry A. "Certain Southerners on the Supreme Court." Georgia Journal of Southern Legal History 1, no. 2 (Fall/Winter 1991): [379]-94.

Includes material on L.Q.C. Lamar (1825-93) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Blackwelder, Lynda Lawrence. "Theodore Gilmore Bilbo: The Mississippi Free Lance Years, 1923-1927. M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1975. iii, 86 l.

Significance of Bilbo's years as a bi-weekly newspaper editor for his subsequent political career.


Blain, William T. "'Banner' Unionism in Mississippi: Choctaw County, 1861-1869." Mississippi Quarterly 29, no. 2 (Spring 1976): 207-20.

Reveals a significant Choctaw County Unionist minority that rose to power after the Civil War; also discusses Confederate deserters, the Bankston cotton mill, and [Benjamin] Grierson's expedition.

Blain, William T. "Challenge to the Lawless: The Mississippi Secret Service, 1870-1871." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 2 (May 1978): 119-31.

Funding, organization, and actions of the covert agency established by Governor James L. Alcorn to combat widespread Reconstruction-era violence.


Blain, William T. Education in the Old Southwest: A History of Jefferson College, Washington, Mississippi. Washington, Miss.: Friends of Jefferson College, 1976. xi, 155 pp.

From founding (1802) to closing (1964) to plans for restoration (1971).


Blain, William T. "William Felix Brantley, 1830-1870." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 4 (Nov. 1975): 359-80.

Death of Brantley, a Choctaw County planter and secession convention delegate who may have fallen victim to the same Brantley-Balzell feud that claimed other members of his family.


Blake, Edward L. Farm Bureau in Mississippi: A History of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation. Jackson: Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation, 1971. xv, 416 pp.

History of the organization, 1922-71, and brief history of its precursors, the Patrons of Husbandry (Grange), the Farmers' Union, and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Blasberg, Robert W. George E. Ohr and His Biloxi Art Pottery. Port Jervis, N.Y.: J.W. Carpenter, 1973. 40 pp.

Heavily illustrated brief account of the life and work of the innovative Harrison County potter (1857-1918).


Bleser, Carol, ed. In Joy and Sorrow: Women, Family, and Marriage in the Victorian South. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1991. xxviii, 330 pp.

Chapter eleven, "A Family Tradition of Letters: The Female Percys and Brontean Mode," by Bertram Wyatt-Brown, traces Mississippi's premier literary family back to three women writers of an earlier generation: Catherine Ann Ware Warfield (1816-77), Eleanor Percy Ware Lee (1819-49), and Sarah Ann Ellis Dorsey (1829-79).


Blitz, John. An Archaeological Study of the Mississippi Choctaw Indians. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1985. Report no. 16. vi, 115 pp.

Profiles early Choctaw society, reconstructs geography of settlements, and describes archaeological survey of the Choctaw homeland in East-Central Mississippi; reprints the author's master's thesis of the same title, University of Southern Mississippi, 1984.


Bloom, Jack M. Class, Race, and the Civil Rights Movement. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987. Blacks in the Diaspora series. x, 267 pp.

Sociological analysis of the civil rights movement of the 1950s-1960s includes many mentions of Mississippi, particularly in chapter six.


Bloom, Jo Tice. "Mississippi's Territorial Delegates." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 4 (Nov. 1975): 327-57.

Spotlights William Lattimore and George Poindexter, two of the four territorial delegates (non-voting representatives) to Congress in the territorial period, 1798-1817.


Bloom, Khaled J. The Mississippi Valley's Great Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1878. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1993. x, 290 pp.

Focuses on the epidemic in New Orleans and Memphis, but also includes discussion of outbreaks in Bay St. Louis (Hancock Co.), Canton (Madison Co.), Crystal Springs (Copiah Co.), Greenville (Washington Co.), Grenada (Grenada Co.), Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), Jackson (Hinds Co.), Lake (Scott Co.), Meridian (Lauderdale Co.), Natchez (Adams Co.), Osyka (Pike Co.), Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), Sardis (Panola Co.), Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Water Valley (Yalobusha Co.), and Winona (Montgomery Co.).


Blotner, Joseph. Faulkner: A Biography. N.Y.: Random House, 1966, 1974. 2 vols.

Exhaustive biography of Nobel Prize-winning writer William Faulkner (1897-1962) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Blumberg, Rhoda L. Civil Rights: The 1960s Freedom Struggle. Boston: Twayne, 1984. xxiii, 209 pp.

See chapter six on SNCC in Mississippi: also includes mentions of Emmett Till and the Neshoba County murders, the Citizens' Council in Indianola (Sunflower Co.), Freedom Summer, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, violence in Greenwood (Leflore Co.), the murder of Medgar Evers, and the integration of the University of Mississippi.


Boeckman, Frances. "Roman Catholic Wooden Churches in Mississippi: Charm with Simple Elegance." Mississippi Folklore Register 21, nos. 1 & 2 (Spring/Fall 1987): 23-27.

Description and photographs of churches served by Bishop Richard Oliver Gerow, 1929-66.


Boehm, Randolph H. "Mary Grace Quackenbos and the Federal Campaign Against Peonage: The Case of Sunnyside Plantation." Arkansas Historical Quarterly 50, no. 1 (Spring 1991): 40-59.

U.S. Department of Justice investigation of charges of Italian immigrants held in debt peonage at an Arkansas plantation leased by Greenville (Washington Co.), Mississippi, investors, including Leroy Percy (1860-1929); article reprinted in Shadows Over Sunnyside: An Arkansas Plantation in Transition, 1830-1945, edited by Jeannie M. Whayne (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993).


Boggess, T.S., Jr. "History of Four Fairgrounds in Noxubee County, 1850 through 1960." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 35-36, 38-40, 46, 48 (Sept. 1985-Dec. 1988).

Multi-part article locates fairgrounds and describes agricultural fairs.


Boles, John B. Black Southerners, 1619-1869. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1984. New Perspectives on the South series. xi, 244 pp.

Numerous mentions of Mississippi in chapter three, "The Maturation of the Plantation System, 1776-1860."


Boles, John B., ed. Masters and Slaves in the House of the Lord: Race and Religion in the American South, 1740-1870. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1988. 257 pp.

Includes essay by Randy Sparks, "Religion in Amite County, Mississippi, 1800-1861," on biracial evangelical churches.


Bolster, Paul D. "Historical Perspectives on Mississippi Aid to Dependent Children Program." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1967. vi, 106 l.

Welfare programs from the territorial period through the mid-twentieth century.


Bolton, Charles C. Poor Whites in the Antebellum South: Tenants and Laborers in Central North Carolina and Northeast Mississippi. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1994. x, 258 pp.

Concludes that poor whites in low-slaveholding areas found it difficult to acquire land, were dominated by powerful landowners, and allowed their own racial prejudice to keep them politically estranged from poor African Americans; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Failure of Yeoman Democracy: Poor Whites in the Antebellum South," Duke University, 1989.


Bolton, Reuben Leon. "History of Prentiss County." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1935. x, 131 l.

Includes information on settlement, the Civil War, religion, transportation, education, newspapers, agriculture and industry, and prominent citizens.


Boman, Martha. "A City of the Old South: Jackson, Mississippi, 1850-1860." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 1 (Jan. 1953): 1-32.

Business, religion, social and intellectual life, health, and race relations in the last antebellum decade; based on the author's master's thesis, "A Social History of Jackson, Mississippi, 1821-1861: State Capital in the Old South," University of Mississippi, 1952.


Bond, Bradley G. "Edward C. Walthall and the 1880 Senatorial Nomination: Politics of Balance in the Redeemer Era." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 1 (Feb. 1988): 1-20.

Argues that the nomination of Walthall (1831-98), an atypical Redeemer, signaled the beginning of Democratic intraparty challenges; based on the author's master's thesis, "Edward Cary Walthall, 1865-1898: A Redeemer Reappraisal," University of Southern Mississippi, 1987.


Bond, Bradley G. "Habits of Foodstuff and Market Production: A Look at Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 56, no. 3 (Aug. 1994): 211-31.

Economic analysis argues that, contrary to the findings of recent historians in regard to other southern states, half of antebellum Mississippi farmers failed to produce enough food to feed their own families, but. instead gambled on making enough money on cotton to purchase their food.


Bond, Bradley G. Political Culture in the Nineteenth-Century South: Mississippi, 1830-1900. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995. [xvi], 343 pp.

Depicts the evolving political ideology and social ethic of white Mississippi; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "A Southern Social Ethic: Political Economy in the Nineteenth-Century South. Mississippi, 1840-1910," Louisiana State University, 1993.


Bondurant, Alexander L. "Did Jones County Secede?" Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1, no. 1 (June 1898): 104-106.

Brief note refuting the legend of the Free State of Jones.


Bondurant, Alexander L. "Sherwood Bonner-Her Life and Place in the Literature of the South." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 43-68.

Includes biographical and genealogical information on Katharine Sherwood Bonner McDowell (1849-83) of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), author of the earliest African American dialect stories.


Bondurant, Alexander L. "William C. Falkner, Novelist." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 113-25.

Biographical information on Falkner (1826-89), great-grandfather of writer William Faulkner and author of The White Rose of Memphis.


Boothe, David F. "Religion and the Negro in Antebellum Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 140 l.

Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Catholic, and Episcopalian missionary work among slaves.


Borden, Juliet Powell. Plantersville, Mississippi, Centennial Publication, 1890-1990. Plantersville, Miss.: n.p., 1990. [62] l.

History of the Lee County community, 1836-1990.


Boschert, Thomas Neville. "A Family Affair: Mississippi Politics, 1882-1932." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1995. 452 l.

Observes that "Mississippi politics was nothing more than a family affair" over this fifty-year period, since Democratic Party elites controlled the state and agreed on everything except how to accomplish their goals.


Boschert, Thomas N. "The Politics of Expediency: Fusion in the Mississippi Delta, Late Nineteenth Century." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1985. vii, 237 l.

Examines post-Reconstruction establishment and demise of black-white political coalitions in Bolivar and Coahoma counties, 1880s to mid-1890s.


Boswell, George. "Major Lamar Fontaine, Mississippi's Answer to Tom Paine, Sergeant York, and Davy Crockett." Mississippi Folklore Register 10, no. 1 (Spring 1976): 29-36.

Anecdotes and some biographical details about the Confederate hero (1829-1921).


Boswell, Ira M. "La Cache." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 313-23.

History of a house near Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.) that was the home of Harmon Blennerhassett, co-conspirator with Aaron Burr.


Boudloche, Robert. "Mississippi and the Prohibition Movement." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1972. 71 l.

Reviews temperance ideology from the early nineteenth century to the end of state prohibition in 1966.


Boulard, Garry. "'The Man' versus 'The Quisling': Theodore Bilbo, Hodding Carter, and the 1946 Democratic Party." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 3 (Aug. 1989): 201-17.

Argues that the intense conflict between U.S. Senator Bilbo and Greenville (Washington Co.) Delta Democrat-Times publisher Carter during Bilbo's 1946 reelection campaign epitomized the "two Mississippis" that perennially clashed over the race issue.


Bounds, Thelma V. Children of Nanih Waiya. San Antonio, Tex.: Naylor, 1964. 64 pp.

Undocumented history of the Choctaw people.


Bowie, Ben. "The Southern Claims Commission, 1871-1880." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 2 (Apr. 1950): 105-15.

Work of the commission to investigate claims by southern loyalists for Civil War reparations; based on the author's master's thesis, "The Southern Claims Commission," University of Mississippi, 1949.


Bowman, Robert. "Early History and Archaeology of Yazoo County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 427-41.

Anecdotal history of the county, 1823-40, which, at the time of its organization, also included present-day Madison, Holmes, Issaquena, and parts of Warren and Washington counties; article makes no mention of archaeology.


Bowman, Robert. "Reconstruction in Yazoo County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 115-30.

Focuses on the county's reaction to state and federal directives and laws; includes account of Governor Adelbert Ames's 1875 visit to Yazoo City only days before the election that removed Republicans from county offices.


Bowman, Robert. "Yazoo County in the Civil War." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 57-73.

Companies organized, escapades of the C.S.S. Arkansas (built at the Yazoo naval yard), Union gunboats on the Yazoo River, and Union raids on Yazoo City after the fall of Vicksburg.


Bowman, Robert. "Yazoo County's Contribution to Mississippi Literature." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 301-304.

Mentions local writers William C. Hall, Henry Lewis, Demosthenes Walker, Harriett N. Prewitt, Robert B. Mayes, Jennie Noonan Wheless, Evelyn Purvis, and I.S. Michie.


Box, Mrs. Eugene [Annie Lauretta Mattox]. "Ante-Bellum Travelers in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 17, no. 2 (Apr. 1955): 110-26.

Impressions of people, geography, accommodations, and slavery, 1800-61, drawn from published accounts only; based on the author's master's thesis, "Mississippi as Described by Travelers, 1800-61," Mississippi State College, 1952.


Boyd, J.L., Sr. History of the Baptists in Rankins County." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 3 (July 1950): 162-68.

Institutional history, 1824-1940s.


Boyd, Jesse Lancy. A Popular History of the Baptists in Mississippi. Jackson, Miss.: Baptist, 1930. 331 pp.

Denominational history from 1780 includes numerous biographical sketches and lists church-affiliated institutions, including schools and hospitals.


Boyles, Andrew Jackson. The Homewood Methodist Church Circuit, Located in Scott and Smith Counties, Mississippi: A Short History, 1874-1962. Petal, Miss.: n.p., [1962?]. 68 pp.

Institutional history.


Bozeman, William Franklin. "Martin Wilson Philips, Mississippi Planter." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1937. ii, 136 l.

Combines biography of Philips (b. 1806), agricultural educator and editor, with analysis of his antebellum farming operations at Log Hall Plantation near Edwards (Hinds Co.).


Brackin, Dennis M. "Controversy between Jefferson Davis and Joseph E. Johnston." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1979. 121 l.

Argues that a personal feud between the Confederate president and one of his top generals that began with differences over military strategy ended up contributing to the South's defeat in the Civil War.


Braden, Guy B. "A Jeffersonian Village: Washington, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 2 (May 1968): 135-42.

Antebellum history of the Adams County community that was once the territorial capital.


Braden, Guy B. "Propinquity: An Adams County, Mississippi, Plantation." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 1 (Feb. 1965): 74-85.

History of the plantation and its owners, 1789-1830s.


Braden, W.H. "Reconstruction in Lee County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 135-46.

Includes information on officeholders, Democratic Party leaders, Ku Klux Klan activity, and intimidation of white citizens by federal troops, 1866-75.


Braden, Waldo W., ed. Oratory in the Old South, 1828-1860. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1970. vii, 311 pp.

Includes scant information on speeches by John A. Quitman, Henry S. Foote, Seargent S. Prestiss, and Giles M. Hillyer.


Braden, Waldo W. "The Rhetoric of a Closed Society." Southern Speech Communications Journal 45, no. 4 (Summer 1980): 333-51.

Reviews segregationist rhetoric in Mississippi, 1954-64, including that of the Jackson Clarion-Ledger and Daily News, publications of the Citizens' Council, and speeches and writings of Judge Thomas P. Brady, Carleton Putnam, U.S. Senator James O. Eastland, Governor Ross R. Barnett, and the Reverend G.T. Gillespie.


Bradford, Gamaliel. Wives. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1925. xiii, 298 pp.

Includes chapter on Varina Howell Davis, wife of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.


Bradford, Keri. "Terror in Liberty: Death and Civil Rights in a Mississippi Community." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1993. 126 l.

Traces white-on-black violence in the vicinity of Liberty (Amite Co.), 1860s-1960s; includes accounts of turn-of-the-century whitecapping, the 1944 lynching of Isaac Simmons, and the murders of Herbert Lee in 1961 and Louis Allen in 1964.


Bradley, Chester D. "Dr. Craven and the Prison Life of Jefferson Davis." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 62, no. 1 (Jan. 1954): 50-94.

Seeks to determine the authenticity of The Prison Life of Jefferson Davis (1866) by Dr. John J. Craven; includes biographical sketch of Craven (1822-93).


Bradley, Chester D. "Was Jefferson Davis Disguised as a Woman When Captured?" Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 3 (Aug. 1974): 243-68.

Concludes that Davis was wearing his wife's cloak and shawl over his own coat, pants, and boots when he was captured by federal troops near Irwinville, Georgia, on May 10, 1865.


Bradley, James. The Confederate Mail Carrier, or From Missouri to Arkansas, Through Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee: An Unwritten Leaf of the "Civil War," Being an Account of the Battles, Marches and Hardships of the First and Second Brigades, Mo., C.S.A. Together with the Thrilling Adventures and Narrow Escapes of Captain Grimes and his Fair Accomplice, Who Carried the Mail by "the underground route" from the Brigade to Missouri. Mexico, Mo.: the author, 1894. ii, 275 pp.

Includes chapters on the battles at Corinth (Alcorn Co.), Iuka (Tishomingo Co.), Vicksburg (Warren Co.), and Ship Island (Harrison Co.).


Bradley, Laura Lipsey. "Protestant Churches and the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi During the 1920s: Study of an Unsuccessful Courtship." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1962. 83 l.

Demonstrates that Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Episcopal churches all resisted involvement with the Klan.


Bradshaw, Willie Mae, and Hope N. Nicholson. Big Red: A Biography of the Late G.W. "Big Red" Hydrick. N.Y.: Vantage, 1977. 231 pp.

Undocumented biography of Hydrick (1906-74), a Mississippi coast bootlegger.


Brady, Hugh G. "Voting, Class, and Demography in Antebellum Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Northern Illinois University, 1977. [ix], 215 l.

Quantitative study of voting patterns delineates socioeconomic and geographic differences between Democratic and Whig voters.


Brain, Jeffrey P. "Artifacts of the Adelantado." Conference for Historic Site Archaeology Papers 8 (1974): 129-38.

Discusses the use of beads and bells, especially the so-called "Clarksdale bells" found in present-day Coahoma County and other sites along the de Soto expedition route, as trade items by sixteenth-century Spanish conquistadors; "adelantado" refers to Hernando de Soto, Adelantado (provincial governor) of Florida.


Brain, Jeffrey P., Alan Toth, and Antonio Rodriguez-Buckingham. "Ethnohistoric Archaeology and the de Soto Entrada into the Lower Mississippi Valley." Conference on Historic Site Archaeology Papers 8, (1974): 232-89.

Uses techniques of archaeology, ethnography, and historiography to interpret the accounts of the participants in the Hernando de Soto expedition of 1539-42.


Brain, Jeffrey P. "The Natchez 'Paradox.'" Ethnology 10, no. 2 (Apr. 1971): 215-22.

Defends John R. Swanton's interpretation of the Natchez Indians' unusual social class structure that was observed by the earliest European settlers.


Brain, Jeffrey P. The Tunica-Biloxi. N.Y.: Chelsea House, 1990. Indians of North America series. 103 pp.

School text on the Native American tribe now resident in Marksville, Louisiana, but which lived along the Mississippi River in Mississippi and Arkansas until the eighteenth century; includes information on the province and town of Quizquiz, which was located in present-day Coahoma County.


Branch, Ellis Ray. "Born of Conviction: Racial Conflict and Change in Mississippi Methodism, 1945-1983." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1984.

Traces the development of a pragmatic racially moderate stance within the church in Mississippi.


Branch, Ellis Ray. "Walter Sillers, Sr.: The Politics of a Southern Planter, 1890-1931." M.A. thesis, Delta State University, 1975. 79 l.

Life of Sillers (1852-1931), lawyer, legislator, and influential Bolivar County planter; emphasizes his political ideology.


Branch, Taylor. Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 1988. xii, 1064 pp.

Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the civil rights movement; see chapters twelve, "The Summer of Freedom Rides," and seventeen, "The Fall of Ole Miss."


Brandfon, Robert L. Cotton Kingdom of the New South: A History of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1967. xiv, 227 pp.

Economic study deals with land speculation, the Illinois Central Railroad, levee building, cotton cultivation, labor, and European immigration; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Planters of the New South: An Economic History of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta," Harvard University, 1961.


Brandfon, Robert L. "The End of Immigration to the Cotton Fields." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 50, no. 4 (Mar. 1964): 591-611.

Depicts Italian families on Delta plantations in the first half-decade of the twentieth century, and explains reasons why European immigrants did not successfully replace former slaves as cotton plantation laborers.


Brandon, Gerard. "Historic Adams County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 207-18.

Natchez and the surrounding area from prehistoric times to 1840.


Brauer, Carl M. John F. Kennedy and the Second Reconstruction. N.Y.: Columbia University Press, 1977. xi, 396 pp.

Chapter seven, "The Battle of Ole Miss," describes the U.S. Department of Justice's efforts to support the enrollment of African American student James Meredith at the University of Mississippi, 1962; argues that President Kennedy was an important instigator of the so-called Second Reconstruction of the South.


Brawley, Benjamin. Negro Builders and Heroes. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1937. x, 315 pp.

Includes biographical sketch of Blanche K. Bruce (1841-98) of Mississippi, the first African American to serve a full term in the U.S. Senate.


Brazy, Martha Jane. "An American Pioneer: Slavery, Entrepreneurship, and Identity in the Life of Stephen Duncan, 1787-1867." Ph.D. dissertation, Duke University, 1998. 554 l.

Examines the Natchez-based plantation empire of Duncan, one of the South's largest slaveholders; includes biography of Duncan; assessment of his property; demographic information on his slaves, their rations, and their punishment; and the impact of the Civil War on Duncan; see also the author's master's thesis, "The World a Slaveholder Made: Stephen Duncan and Plantation Society," University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1987.


Breed, Arelia. "Other Early Noxubeeans Also Migrated to Union Parish, Louisiana." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 27 (Sept. 1983): 6-7.

Brief mention of John Culbertson family members who moved to Louisiana beginning in 1842.


Breed, Arelia. "Some Other Early Union Parish, Louisiana Settlers from Noxubee and Kemper Counties, Mississippi." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 28 (Dec. 1983): 8.

Larkin Callaway and Jesse Tubb families, who had moved to Louisiana by the 1840s.


Breed, Warren. "Comparative Newspaper Handling of the Emmett Till Case." Journalism Quarterly 35, no. 3 (Summer 1958): 291-98.

Contrasts coverage of the 1955 Tallahatchie County murder and subsequent trial in eleven northern and southern newspapers, including two unnamed Mississippi papers.


Breen, William J. "Black Women and the Great War: Mobilization and Reform in the South." Journal of Southern History 44, no. 3 (Aug. 1978): 421-40.

Explores efforts of the Committee on Women's Defense Work to incorporate African American women into the general World War I effort; includes mention of discrimination by the Red Cross against its black women workers in Mississippi.


Breese, Donald Hobert. "Politics in the Lower South during Presidential Reconstruction, April to November, 1865." Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 1964. 438 l.

Political activity by defeated Southerners, including Mississippians.


Breihan, Carl W. Badmen of the Frontier Days. N.Y.: McBride, 1957. 315 pp.

Chapter one, "John Murrell: The First Fabulous Crime Syndicate," describes the career of Murrell (b. 1804), head of the Grand Council of the Mystic Clan, a slave-stealing gang of the 1830s.


Brent, Robert A. "Mississippi and the Mexican War. Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 3 (Aug. 1969): 202-14.

Argues that while Mississippians were uneasy that land gained from Mexico might not be designated slave territory, they were nonetheless more united in support of the Mexican War of 1846-48 than of any other conflict except the Civil War.


Bretz, Julian P. "Early Land Communication with the Lower Mississippi Valley." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 13, no. 1 (June 1926): 3-29.

Includes discussion of the necessity and perils of improving the Natchez Trace after the organization of the Mississippi Territory in 1798.


Briceland, Alan V. "Ephraim Kirby: Mr. Jefferson's Emissary on the Tombigbee-Mobile Frontier in 1804." Alabama Review 24, no. 3 (Apr. 1971): 83-113.

Travels and duties of Kirby (1757-1804), U.S. commissioner in Washington County (now Alabama); includes descriptions of his meetings with Thomas Rodney and Robert Williams, land commissioners for the Mississippi Territory.


Briceland, Alan V. "The Mississippi Territorial Land Board West of the Pearl River, 1804." Alabama Review 32, no. 1 (Jan. 1979): 38-68.

Observes that under William Claiborne the board sold 1.6 million acres of land in the Natchez District.


Bridgforth, Lucie Robertson. "'Bomb the Ban': A Study of the Legal Controversy Surrounding Off-Campus Speakers at Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1979. 180 l.

Examines the background of the speaker ban regulations enacted by the IHL board, 1955-71; spotlights the board's president, Dr. M.M. Roberts of Hattiesburg (Forrest Co.), and follows the series of lawsuits to block the board's attempt to isolate the state's students from "outside agitators."


Bridgforth, Lucie Robertson. Medical Education in Mississippi: A History of the School of Medicine. Jackson, Miss.: Medical Alumni Chapter and Guardian Society of the University of Mississippi Alumni Association, 1984. xiv, 258 pp.

History of the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson (Hinds Co.) and its pre-1955 antecedents; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Medical Education in Mississippi," Memphis State University, 1982, which also covers historical barriers to medical education in the state from the antebellum period.


Bridgforth, Lucie Robertson. "Medicine in Antebellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 2 (May 1984): 82-107.

Describes bizarre medical practices, incompetence of physicians, opposition of Jacksonian Democrats to the licensing of doctors by the state, and the state's growing isolation from northern advances in medicine during the Civil War.


Bridgforth, Lucie Robertson. "Mississippi's Response to Nullification, 1833." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 1 (Feb. 1983): 1-21.

Responses to the Tariff of 1820 and South Carolina's Ordinance of Nullification, 1832; argues that Mississippi's reaction was complicated by attitudes toward President Andrew Jackson, sectional jealousies, and intrastate conflicts, and was not simply a "prelude to Civil War."


Brieger, James F., comp. Hometown Mississippi. N.p.: the author, 1980. 557 pp.

Gazetteer, organized by county, includes origins of most town and county names.


Brigham, Jeremy John. "Transforming Places." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Iowa, 1998. 453 l.

Whites in Linn County, Iowa, and African Americans in Holmes County, Mississippi, came together during and after Freedom Summer of 1964.


Briley, Asa Thomas. "Suffrage and Apportionment in Mississippi to 1861: A Study of the Relation Between Population Groups and Their Representation in Legislative Bodies." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1934. 65 l.

Examines voter qualifications in the territorial period and under the constitutions of 1817 and 1832, and assesses the extent to which, as the electorate gradually expanded, legislators democratically represented their constituents.


Brinegar, Bonnie. "Choctaw Place-Names in Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 11, no. 2 (Fall 1977): 142-50.

Meanings of twenty-four geographical names.


Brinson, Carroll. Jackson: A Special Kind of Place. Jackson, Miss.: City of Jackson, 1977.

Bicentennial history of the capital city.


Brinson, Carroll. The Stuart C. Irby Story. Jackson, Miss.: Oakdale, 1980. x, 187 pp.

Business history of the Stuart C. Irby Company and Irby Construction Company of Jackson (Hinds Co.), 1926-80; includes biographical information on the founder (1888-1979) and his family.


Brinson, Carroll. A Tradition of Looking Ahead: The Story of Bryan Foods. Jackson, Miss.: Oakdale, 1986. ix, 189 pp.

Business history of Bryan Foods of West Point (Clay Co.), 1936-86, the first federally-inspected meat packing plant in the state; includes family history.


Broadway, Mrs. Hurshel Henry [Lilibel]. "Frank Burkitt: The Man in the Wool Hat." M.S. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1948. 74 l.

Biographical study of the journalist and leading Mississippi Populist (b. 1843).


Brock, Euline W. "Thomas W. Cardozo: Fallible Black Reconstruction Leader." Journal of Southern History of 47, no. 2 (May 1981): 183-206.

Analyzes the failure of the African American carpetbagger who became Mississippi's state superintendent of education in 1873.


Brodsky, Louis Daniel. "Faulkner and the Racial Crisis, 1956." Southern Review 24, no. 4 (Autumn 1988): 791-807.

Discovery of forty-three letters to and from writer William Faulkner of Oxford (Lafayette Co.), March-April 1956, helps to clarify his moderate but often misunderstood and misstated position on civil rights for African Americans.


Brooks, Gary H. "Inter- and Intragroup Conflict in Black Politics: A Case Study of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party." M.A. thesis, Tulane University, 1970. 111 l.

Based largely on the author's own experiences in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, the article examines the role of the alternative Democratic party in enfranchising African American Mississippians and discusses the conflict between the party and the NAACP.


Brooks, Mary. "Health as a Determining Factor in the Economic Life of Mississippi, 1900-1920." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1968. vii, 147 l.

State of medical education and public health measures and the effect on the population of endemic and epidemic diseases such as smallpox, malaria, yellow fever, hookworm, tuberculosis, and pellagra.


Brooksher, William K., and David K. Snider. "A Visit to Holly Springs." Civil War Times Illustrated 14, no. 3 (June 1975): 4-9, 4-44.

Describes Confederate General Earl Van Dorn's 1862 mission to attack the Union supply depot at Holly Springs (Marshall Co.) in order to thwart Union General U.S. Grant's planned attack on Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Broom, Gipsie Joy. "An Historical Study of the Mississippi Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation." Ph.D.dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1971. 212 l.

Institutional history, 1932-70.


Broom, Knox M. History of Mississippi Public Junior Colleges: A State System of Public Junior Colleges, 1928-1953. [Jackson, Miss.]: n..p., [1954?]. 90 pp.

Development of the system; includes extensive tables.


Brough, Charles Hillman. "The Clinton Riot." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 53-63.

Blow-by-blow account of a fracas at a Democratic political rally in Clinton (Hinds Co.) in 1875 at which at least ten persons died; argues that President U.S. Grant's policy of non-intervention by federal troops in such cases indirectly led to the Democratic victory at the polls two months later and to the end of Reconstruction in the state.


Brough, Charles Hillman. "Historic Clinton." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 281-311.

History of the Hinds County town; focuses on early settlers, Mississippi and Hillman colleges, and Reconstruction-era violence, particularly the riot of September 4, 1875


Brough, Charles Hillman. "History of Taxation in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 113-24.

State and local tax laws, 1798-1898.


Brough, Charles Hillman. "History of Banking in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 317-40.

Early state banks, repudiation of Union and Planters Bank bonds in 1842, and the establishment of national banks after 1865.


Broussard, Ray. "Governor John A. Quitman and the Lopez Expeditions of 1851-1852." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 2 (May 1966): 103-20.

Quitman's indictment, subsequent resignation, and then acquittal on charges that he participated in filibustering schemes to annex Cuba as a slave state.


Brown, A.J. "Antiquities of Newton County, Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 441-48.

Criticizes the Newton County section of the 1722 Bernard Romans map for its incorrect naming and location of Choctaw settlements.


Brown, A.J "Choctaw Mission Station at Jasper County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 349-50.

Description of appearance and location of the Six Towns Mission Station, established c.1825, and the uses to which the property has been put in subsequent years.


Brown, A.J. History of Newton County, Mississippi, from 1834-1894. Jackson, Miss.: Clarion-Ledger, 1894. xiv, 472 pp.

Includes information on Native Americans, early white settlers, county organization and government, railroads, farming, newspapers, housing, and religion; emphasis on Civil War and Reconstruction.


Brown, Andrew. "The First Mississippi Partisan Rangers." Civil War History 1, no. 4 (Dec. 1955): 371-99.

"Falkner's Regiment" under Colonel William C. Falkner of Ripley (Tippah Co.) and subsequent commanders, 1862-65.


Brown, Andrew. History of Tippah County, Mississippi: The First Century. Ripley, Miss.: Tippah County Historical and Genealogical Society, 1976. xii, 319 pp.

Covers early settlers, agriculture, slavery, transportation, religion, education, politics, newspapers, Civil War and Reconstruction, and two chapters on William C. Falkner, great-grandfather of writer William Faulkner.


Brown, Andrew. "Sol Street, Confederate Partisan Leader." Journal of Mississippi History 21, no. 3 (July 1959): 155-73.

Activities of Solomon G. Street's guerilla band, Company A, Second Mississippi Cavalry, which harassed Union troops in North Mississippi, 1862-64.


Brown, Bahngrell W. "The First Hundred Years of Geology in Mississippi." Southern Quarterly 13, no. 4 (July 1975): 295-302.

Covers the period from 1776 to1876, including the formation of the Mississippi Agricultural and Geological Survey and the contributions of geologists Sir Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and Eugene Hilgard (1833-1916).


Brown, Calvin S. Archeology in Mississippi. University, Miss.: Geological Survey, 1926. xi, 372 pp.

Locates Indian mounds and describes items found at digs throughout the state.


Brown, Charles H. Edited by John Ray Skates. "Fox Conner: A General's General." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 3 (Aug. 1987): 179-202.

Career of Conner, chief of plans and operations under General Pershing in World War I and teacher of future president Dwight D. Eisenhower.


Brown, D. Alexander. "The Battle of Brice's Cross Roads." Civil War Times Illustrated 7, no. 1 (Apr. 1968): 4-9, 44-48.

Circumstances prior to the Lee/Union County battle of June 10, 1864.


Brown, D. Alexander. "Battle at Chickasaw Bluffs." Civil War Times Illustrated 9, no. 4 (July 1970): 4-9, 44-48.

Union General William T. Sherman's unsuccessful December 1862 assault on Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Brown, D. Alexander. Grierson's Raid: A Cavalry Adventure of the Civil War. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1954. 261 pp.

Account of the expedition through central Mississippi, April-May, 1863, by three Union cavalry regiments led by Colonel Benjamin Henry Grierson to destroy railroads and divert Confederate attention from the campaign at Vicksburg.


Brown, D. Alexander. "Grierson's Raid, 'Most Brilliant' of the War." Civil War Times Illustrated 3, no. 9 (June 1965): 4-11, 25-32.

Events of Union Colonel Benjamin Grierson's seventeen-day march across Mississippi, timed to coincide with General U.S. Grant's movements against Vicksburg, April-May, 1983.


Brown, Dale Campbell, et al. Stanton Hall, Natchez. Natchez, Miss.: Myrtle Books, 1980. 80 pp.

History of the Natchez (Adams Co.) mansion built in 1858 by planter Frederick Stanton (1794-1859).


Brown, Eugene Richard. "A History of Scott County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1967.

Includes county organization 1833, antebellum social and cultural life, post-Reconstruction economic development, and the involvement of Scott County citizens in major wars; Reconstruction is not covered.


Brown, Glenn K. "Walter Sillers, Jr., and Martin S. Conner: A Study in Mississippi Political Relationships." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1984. vii, 82 l.

Sillers (b. 1888) and Conner (b. 1891), both speakers of the Mississippi House of Representatives and both opponents of Theodore G. Bilbo, forged a cross-regional alliance that helped elect Conner governor.


Brown, Ian W. Natchez Indian Archaeology: Culture Change and Stability in the Lower Mississippi Valley. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1985. Mississippi Department of Archives and History Archaeological Reports, no. 15. xii, 308 pp.

Examination of ten sites focuses on the relationship between the Natchez Indians and French and English settlers in the early eighteenth century.


Brown, J.C. "Reconstruction in Yalobusha and Grenada Counties." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (1912): 214-82.

Covers politics and government, the presence of federal troops, the Freedmen's Bureau, Loyal Leagues, and the Ku Klux Klan, the local economy, education, and religion; includes introduction on the early history of the counties.


Brown, Margaret Rowe. "Graduate Programs in Mississippi to 1900." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1968. 85 l.

Advanced degree-granting programs at the University of Mississippi and Mississippi State College and at several small colleges and academies that offered degrees but did not actually award any; post-graduate professional programs not included


Brown, Maud Morrow. The History of the First Presbyterian Church of Oxford, Mississippi: July 15, 1837-Mach 31, 1950. Oxford, Miss.: n.p., 1952. 78 pp.

History of the Lafayette County church.


Brown, Maud Morrow. "William C. Falkner: Man of Legends." Georgia Review 10, no. 4 (Winter 1956): 421-39.

Life of the Ripley (Tippah Co.) novelist and railroad builder (d. 1889) who was the great-grandfather of writer William Faulkner.


Brown, R. Jess. "A History of the Magnolia Bar Association." Mississippi Lawyer 33, no. 5 (Mar.-Apr. 1987): 22.

Founding of the association of African American lawyers in Mississippi, 1955; includes list of presidents.


Brown, Robert S. History of the Mississippi School for the Deaf, Jackson, Mississippi, with an Appendix, 1854-1954: One Hundred Years of Service. Meridian, Miss.: Gower Printing, n.d. 268 pp.

Institutional history.


Brown, Robert Larry. "A Revival of Conservatism in Mississippi Politics: The Administration of Henry L. Whitfield, 1924-1927." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1962. 97 l.

Argues that the administration swept away the "corruption and scandal" of governors James K. Vardaman and Theodore G. Bilbo and encouraged economic prosperity.


Browne, F.Z. "Reconstruction in Oktibbeha County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 13 (1913): 273-98.

Largely anecdotal article concentrates on coercive means employed by local whites to control both African American and white Republicans.


Broyles, Vernon S. History of the First Presbyterian Church of Canton, Mississippi. N.p., [1977?]. 86 pp.

History of the Madison County church, 1837-1977.


Bruce, Dickson D., Jr. Violence and Culture in the Antebellum South. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1979. x, 322 pp.

Includes discussion of the practice of dueling and the institution of slavery in Mississippi.


Brundage, W. Fitzhugh, ed. Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997. ix, 330 pp.

Includes "Lynching and Political Power in Mississippi and South Carolina," by Terence Finnegan.


Brundage, W. Fitzhugh, ed. Where These Memories Grow: History, Memory, and Southern Identity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Includes "The Talk of the County: Revisiting Accusation, Murder, and Mississippi, 1895," by John Howard.


Brunson, G.H. "The Beginning of a New Period in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 317-24.

Changes wrought in the state in the 1820s and 1830s with the advent of Jacksonian democracy: population growth, increased cotton production, Indian land cessions, and a new constitution that provided for an elective judiciary and changes in laws respecting banking and slave importation.


Bruss, Melvin Kellogg. "History of Oakland College (Mississippi), 1830-1871." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1965. v, 150 l.

Presbyterian influences, founding, closing, and successors of the Claiborne/Jefferson County college which became the site of Alcorn State University.


Bryan, G.S. "Reminiscences of Amory, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 1 (Jan. 1948): 27-43.

History of the Monroe County town since its founding in 1888.


Bryant, Jennifer. "Tula, Mississippi, and the Mississippi Dogtrot." Mississippi Folklife 29, no. 1 (Summer/Fall 1996): 6-21.

Analysis of several late nineteenth-century homes in Lafayette County that incorporate the open-hallway dogtrot form into one- and two-storey frame houses.


Buchanan, Mims Cochran. "Greenwood Leflore, Last Chief of the Choctaws." Delta Review 2, no. 4 (Sept./Oct. 1965): 46-47, 68-72.

Life of the last chief (1800-65) of the Mississippi Choctaws before removal to Oklahoma.


Buck, John T. History of the Mississippi Baptist State Convention, with a List of Its Officers, to which is Appended a Chapter on the Mission Work of the Denomination in Mississippi. Jackson, Miss.: Charles Winkley, 1883. 70 pp.

History of the denomination in the state, 1835-83, including list of officers and missions.


Buckley, George T. "Joseph B. Cobb: Mississippi Essayist and Critic." American Literature 10, no. 2 (May 1938): 166-78.

First four pages review scant biographical information on Cobb (1819-58), author of Mississippi Scenes (1851).


Buice, S. David, II. "The Military and Civil Career of Adelbert Ames, 1861-1876." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1963. vii, 118 l.

Finds Ames (1835-1933) to have been a complete failure as military and Reconstruction governor and claims that "no man did more to retard the growth of Negro equality."


Buice, S. David. "The Military Career of Adelbert Ames." Southern Quarterly 2, no. 3 (Apr. 1964): 236-46.

Chronicles career of Ames (1835-1933) in the Union army and as acting inspector general of the Fourth Military District.


The Buildings of Biloxi: An Architectural Survey. Biloxi, Miss.: City of Biloxi, Miss., 1976. 172 pp.

History, descriptions, and some illustrations of over two hundred structures.


Bullen, Robert Whitefield. "Footnotes to Vermont History: Joseph Bullen, Vermont Expatriate." Vermont History 24, no. 4 (Oct. 1956): 315-16.

Brief sketch of Bullen (1750-1825), founder of the first Presbyterian church in Mississippi, 1804.


Bullen, Robert W. "Joseph Bullen, Some Biographical Notes." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 3 (Aug. 1965): 265-67.

Bullen (1750-1825) was a Presbyterian clergyman and missionary to the Choctaws in the early nineteenth century.


Bunch, William H., Jr. "A History of Warren County, Mississippi, to 1860." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1965. vi, 108 l.

Antebellum history from the earliest white settlement, including social life, economy, and politics.


Bunch, Paul William. "'How Are You Going to Keep Them Down on the Farm?' A Legislative and Judicial Survey of the Mississippi Enticement Laws, 1865-1917." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1979. 135 l.

Examines the Enticement Laws (1865 and 1890), which supported peonage by making illegal the breaking of a labor contract by a laborer and the encouragement of a laborer to leave his employer by a labor agent


Burger, Nash K. "Adam Cloud, Mississippi's First Episcopal Clergyman." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no 2 (Apr. 1947): 88-97.

Life of Cloud, who lived in Mississippi in 1790-95 and 1815-32.


Burger, Nash K. "Battle Hill and St. Andrew's College." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 2 (Apr. 1942): 84-89.

History of a tract of land in Jackson (Hinds Co.) that encompasses a Civil War battle site and the location of an antebellum college.


Burger, Nash Kerr. "The Diocese of Mississippi and the Confederacy." Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church 9, no. 1 (Mar. 1950): 52-77.

Effects of the Civil War on the Episcopal Church.


Burger, Nash K. A History of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Jackson, Mississippi, 1830-1944. Jackson, Miss.: n.p., 1944. 29 pp.

Brief history of the church, including a list of rectors.


Burger, Nash K. "Notes and Documents: An Overlooked Source for Mississippi Local History: The Spirit of Missions, 1836-1854." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 3 (July 1945): 171-75.

Advocates the periodical published by the Episcopal Church's Board of Domestic and Foreign Missions, as a source for northern missionaries' observations about Mississippi.


Burger, Nash K. "The Rt. Rev. William Mercer Green, First Episcopal Bishop of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 1 (Jan. 1950): 3-27.

Life of the bishop, who served from 1850 to 1887; portions of the article also appeared in "William Mercer Green, First Bishop of Mississippi, 1850-1887" (Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church, December 1950).


Burger, Nash. "A Side-Light and an Ante-Bellum Plantation Chapel." Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church 12, no. 1 (Mar. 1943): 69-73.

Brief description of St. Mary's Church, an abandoned chapel on Laurel Hill Plantation in Adams County.


Burger, Nash Kerr. "The Society for the Advancement of Christianity in Mississippi." Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church 4, no. 3 (Sept. 1945): 264-69.

Episcopal diocesan missionary society established in Natchez (Adams Co.), 1827.


Burger, Nash K. "Some Notes on Hugh Miller Thompson, Second Episcopal Bishop of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no 1 (Jan. 1957): 31-37.

Thompson's accomplishments while in Mississippi, 1883-1902.


Burger, Nash K., and John K. Bettersworth. South of Appomattox. N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace, 1959. vii, 376 pp.

Biographies of Confederate leaders, including Jefferson Davis and L.Q.C. Lamar.


Burkhalter, Lois Wood. Gideon Lincecum, 1793-1874, a Biography. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1965. xiii, 362 pp.

Lincecum, Indian trader and botanic physician, lived in Cotton Gin Port (Monroe Co.) and Columbus (Lowndes Co.), 1818-48, before relocating to Texas.


Burner, Eric R. And Gently Shall He Lead Them: Robert Parris Moses and the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi. N.Y.: New York University Press, 1994. xii, 294 pp.

Biography of Moses (b. 1935), influential civil rights leader.


Burns, Zed H. "Ship Island: An Annotated Bibliography." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 2 (May 1970): 147-51.

Cites primary and secondary sources, 1840-1970, on the history of the island off the Gulf Coast near Biloxi (Harrison Co.).


Burns, Zed H. Ship Island and the Confederacy. Hattiesburg: University and College

Press of Mississippi, 1971. xi, 52 pp.

Federal occupation and use of the island as a Union prisoner of war camp; based on the author's master's thesis, "Ship Island in the Civil War," University of Southern Mississippi, 1970.


Burrage, Jack. "The Oxford Eagle as Seen from Its Files, 1883-1950." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1955. 128 l.

Based on extant copies of the Lafayette County weekly newspaper; examines factors contributing to the paper's success and incidentally includes sporadic local history.


Burson, George S., Jr. "The 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer Project." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1972. 96 l.

Examines the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee's massive voter registration effort; includes a chapter on the background, 1961-63, of the project.


Burt, Jesse, and Robert B. Ferguson. Indians of the Southeast: Then and Now. Nashville, Tenn.: Abington, 1973. 304 pp.

Includes brief treatments of historical Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Natchez peoples, as well as the modern Choctaw Nation.


Burton, Orville Vernon, and Robert C. McMath, Jr., eds. Class, Conflict, and Consensus: Antebellum Southern Community Studies. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1982. xxvi, 308 pp.

Includes "Making Mississippi Safe for Slavery: The Insurrectionary Panic of 1835," by Laurence Shore.


Busby, Anne Ophelia. "A Statistical Analysis of the Liquor Referenda in Mississippi, 1934 and 1952." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1953. vi, 99 l.

Includes wet/dry votes by county.


Bush, Louise Wootten. "Propaganda During the Civil War as Seen in the Mississippi Newspapers." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1943. 51 l.

Dates the beginning of war propaganda from January 1862 and follows its expansion as Confederate war fortunes declined.


Butcher, Jerry Lee. "A Narrative History of Selected Aspects of Violence in the New South, 1877-1920." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Missouri-Columbia, 1977. 218 l.

Includes discussion of the Mississippi whitecaps.


Butler, Heard Wylie. "Penal Reform in Mississippi, 1799-1839." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1983. 142 l.

Elements of the penal reform movement: increasing lawlessness and vigilantism, arguments against corporal and capital punishment, and agitation for penitentiary construction.


Butts, Alfred Benjamin. "Public Administration in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (Centenary Series, 1919): 5-278.

Includes history of public education, banking, taxation, public health, and agricultural administration; reprints the author's Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1920.


Butts, William A. "The Relationship of Economic and Social Variables to Population Change and Negro Voter Registration in Mississippi, 1940-1966. Ph.D. dissertation, Southern Illinois University, 1968. xiv, 223 l.

Quantitative analysis of the reasons for African American outmigration and the low rate of black voter registration in the state.


Byington, Cyrus. Edited by John R. Swanton and Henry S. Halbert. A Dictionary of the Choctaw Language. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1915. xi, 611 pp.

Choctaw-English and English-Choctaw dictionary compiled by Byington (1793-1868), a missionary to the Choctaws in Mississippi for nearly fifty years.


Bynum, Victoria E. "'White Negroes' in Segregated Mississippi: Miscegenation, Racial Identity, and the Law." Journal of Southern History 64, no. 2 (May 1998): 247-76.

Traces family history of Davis Knight, who was convicted of miscegenation in 1948; Davis was a mixed-race descendant of Confederate deserter and outlaw Newton Knight (c. 1837-1922) of Jones County.


Cabaniss, Allen. "Ackia: Battle in the Wilderness." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 5, no. 1 (Nov. 1972): 1-16.

Maintains that the French defeat by the Chickasaw in the 1736 battle in present-day Lee County led to the concession of French lands to the British; article reprinted in History Today in December 1975.


Cabaniss, Allen. First Presbyterian Church, Hazelhurst, Mississippi, 1860-1985. Hazelhurst, Miss.: First Presbyterian Church, 1985. 92 pp.

Institutional history.


Cabaniss, Allen. "A Forgotten Footnote to Lincoln." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 2 (May 1974): 187-97.

Family history of John M. Cabaniss of Sangamon County, Illinois, friend of Abraham Lincoln and grandfather of Georgetta Lanterman Ellis (1860-1957) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Cabaniss, Allen. Freemasonry in Mississippi. N.p.: Grand Lodge of Mississippi, F.&A.M., 1976. 56 peppy

History of the Masons in Mississippi since the first charter in Natchez (Adams Co.) in 1801.


Cabaniss, Allen. Life and Thought of a Country Preacher: C.W. Grafton, D.D., L.L.D. Richmond, Va.: John Knox, 1942. 219 pp.

Biography and writings of Cornelius Washington Grafton (1846-1934), Presbyterian pastor at Union Church (Jefferson Co.).


Cabaniss, Allen. "The Martyrs of Mississippi." Religion in the Making 3, no. 7 (Nov. 1942): 41-54.

Defines as Christian martyrs: the French massacred by the Natchez in 1729; French prisoners tortured and killed after the Battle of Ackia in 1736; Dr. Hugh Bodley, murdered by gamblers in Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1835; and Dr. Jeremiah Chamberlain, president of Oakland College (now Alcorn State University), who was murdered in 1851.


Cabaniss, Allen. "'Rob' Morris in Mississippi, 1842-1852." Journal of Mississippi History 3, no. 4 (Nov. 1977): 291-302.

Life of the man who claimed to be the originator of the Order of the Eastern Star in Freemasonry.


Cabaniss, Frances A., and Allen Cabaniss. "The Middle Ages and Mississippi: A Note." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 4 (Oct. 1951): 212-25.

Undocumented essay portrays the "thoroughly medieval aura" surrounding Hernando de Soto's sixteenth-century expedition through the Southeast.


Cabaniss, Frances Allen, and James Allen Cabaniss. "Religion in Ante-Bellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 4 (Oct. 1944): 191-224.

Broad overview beginning with the introduction of Christianity into the region at the time of Hernando de Soto's sixteenth-century expedition.


Cabaniss, Frances Allen, and James Allen Cabaniss. "Religion in Mississippi Since 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 4 (Oct. 1947): 195-218.

History of various Protestant denominations.


Cabaniss, J. Allen. "The Mississippi Jus Circa Sacra: A Note." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 3 (July 1950): 169-73.

Examines the state law affecting the external affairs of religious organizations.


Cabaniss, James Allen. A History of the University of Mississippi. University: University of Mississippi, 1949. xviii, 242 pp.

Centennial history.


Cagin, Seth, and Philip Dray. We Are Not Afraid: The Story of Goodman, Schwerner, and Chaney and the Civil Rights Campaign for Mississippi. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1988. 500 pp.

Detailed narrative of the 1964 murders of three Freedom Summer volunteers in Neshoba County.


Cain, Cyril Edward, comp. and ed. Four Centuries on the Pascagoula: History, Story, and Legend of the Pascagoula River Country. N.p.: the author, 1953-62. 2 vols.

History of Jackson and George counties, including lists of post offices and land claims, census reports, weather, organizations, cemetery records, and genealogy.


Cain, Helen, and Anne D. Czarniecki. An Illustrated Guide to the Governor's Mansion. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984. 91 pp.

Heavily illustrated description of the 1839-41 mansion and catalog of its furnishings.


Cain, J.B. Hazelhurst Methodist Church, 1860-1960: A History of Hazelhurst Methodist Church. Nashville, Tenn.: Parthenon, n.d. 104 pp.

Centennial history of the Copiah County church.


Cain, J.B. Magnolia Methodist Church, 1856-1956: A History of Magnolia Methodist Church. Nashville, Tenn.: Parthenon, n.d. 128 pp.

Centennial history of the Pike County church.


Cain, J.B. Methodism in the Mississippi Conference, 1846-1870. Jackson, Miss.: Hawkins Foundation, Mississippi Conference Historical Society, 1939. xx, 519 pp.

Detailed history, including clergy, founding of churches and schools, revivals, publications, missions, and membership; continues history of the same title begun by John Griffing Jones.


Cain, John Buford. The Cradle of Mississippi Methodism. N.p., [1920?]. 73 pp.

History of the Washington Circuit (parts of Adams, Wilkinson, Franklin, and Jefferson counties), the first Methodist circuit in Mississippi, 1799-1919; includes information on Elizabeth Female Academy.


Caire, R.J., and Katy Caire. History of Pass Christian. Pass Christian, Miss.: Lafayette, 1976. 122 pp.

History, 1699-1976, of the Harrison County coastal community includes information on settlement, Civil War and Reconstruction, tourism, NASA, African Americans, transportation, government, churches, schools, libraries, organizations, land development and housing, businesses, and families.


Caldwell, Elizabeth. "Reconstruction in Yazoo County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina, 1931. xvi, 69 l.

Reviews social, economic, and political conditions, 1865-76.


Caldwell, Joan. "Christmas in Old Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 21, no. 4 (Oct. 1959): 257-70.

Depicts plantation Christmas customs in present-day Adams County and the surrounding area, 1840s-1850s; based on the author's master's thesis, "The Christmas Season in the Ante-Bellum Natchez Region," University of Southern Mississippi, 1958.


Calhoon, Robert M., Timothy M. Barnes, and George A. Rawlyk, eds. Loyalists and Community in North America. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1994. 226 pp.

Includes "Loyalist West Florida: An Ambiguous Community," by Robin F.A. Fabel, which briefly discusses British loyalists in Natchez (Adams Co.).


"The Calhoon Institute." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 13 (Mar. 1980): 5-7.

History of the Macon girls' school, 1850s-70s.


Calhoon, Frederick S. The Lawmen: United States Marshals and Their Deputies, 1789-1989. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1989. xii, 370 pp.

"A Night in Mississippi" in chapter eleven deals with the Marshal Service's role in the integration of the University of Mississippi in 1962.


Callaway, Carla Sue. "Poor Relief in Mississippi, 1799-1935." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1979. 102 l.

Reviews poor laws and relief programs and includes case study of Lafayette County, 1910-35.


Callaway, Michelle Elizabeth. "Mississippi's Segregation Academy Movement, 1954-1970." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1993. iv, 106 l.

Examines tactics employed to avoid implementation of the Brown decision, including legislative intervention and the establishment of private schools after Alexander v. Holmes County (1970), which mandated immediate integration of public schools


Callon, Sim C., and Carolyn Vance Smith. The Goat Castle Murder: A True Natchez Story That Shocked the World. Natchez, Miss.: Plantation, 1985. v. 68 pp.

Heavily illustrated account of the investigation of the 1932 murder of Jane Surget Merrill (b. 1864) at her Natchez (Adams Co.) home, Glenburnie..


Calvert, Anne Gates. "A History of Clay County, Mississippi, Prior to 1900." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 97 l.

Settlement and establishment of the county, Civil War fighting, Reconstruction politics, and postbellum industrialization.


Cameron, Mary Effie. "The Summer of 1835 in Mississippi History." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1931. 40 l.

Recounts the rumored Madison County slave insurrection, which led to the vigilante killings of about fifty slaves, and the Gambler's War, punctuated by the lynching of five gamblers in Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Cameron, William Mack. "The Cases of Henry Bucklew." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1969. 96 l.

Examines 1966 charges brought against the mayor of Laurel (Jones Co.) in an effort to remove him from office after he made anti-Ku Klux Klan remarks.


Cammack, Abner Sam, III. "Emmett Lloyd Ross: Soldier, Editor, and Politician." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 160 l.

Tempestuous career of Ross (1838-91), owner and editor of two Canton (Madison Co.) newspapers, the Mail and the Pickett.


Campbell, Clarice T. "Exploring the Roots of Tougaloo College." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 1 (Feb. 1973): 15-27.

Unsuccessful effort to establish the school by former Union officer Allen P. Huggins, 1869.


Campbell, Clarice T., and Oscar Allen Rogers, Jr. Mississippi: The View from Tougaloo. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1979. xii, 276 pp.

Institutional history beginning with founding, 1869; including list of graduates to 1978; based on Campbell's Ph.D. dissertation, "A History of Tougaloo College," University of Mississippi, 1970, and her master's thesis, "The Founding of Tougaloo College," University of Mississippi, 1967.


Campbell, E.S. "Three Mississippi Poets of the Nineteenth Century." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 1 (Jan. 1943): 38-40.

Brief sketches of Andrew Haslett of Natchez (Adams Co.), active from 1816- to 1817; Irwin Russell of Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), active at mid-century; and Walter Malone of Hernando (De Soto Co.), active in the late nineteenth century.


Campbell, Florence E. "Journal of the Minutes of the Board of Trustees of the University of Mississippi, 1845-1860." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1939. 473 l.

Includes biographical sketches of twenty-eight board and faculty members.


Campbell, J.A.C. "Planters and Union Bank Bonds." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 493-97.

Establishment of the Planters and Union banks and their issuance and subsequent repudiation of bonds, 1830s.


Campbell, Leslie C. "History of the Mississippi State Pharmaceutical Association: A Study of Functions, 1902-1950." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1964. 120 l.

Reviews organizational history and laws relating to the practice of pharmacy.


Campbell, Leslie Caine. Two Hundred Years of Pharmacy in Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1974. xv, 207 pp.

Traces the evolution of the profession from Choctaw "big doctors" to the establishment of the School of Pharmacy at the University of Mississippi; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "History of Pharmacy in Mississippi," University of Mississippi, 1967.


Campbell, T.N. "The Choctaw Afterworld." Journal of American Folklore 72, no. 284 (Apr./June 1959): 146-54.

Describes the Choctaw concept of the afterlife and its system of reward and punishment.


Campbell, Tom Walter. Fourscore Forgotten Men: Sketches of the Justices of the Supreme Court. Little Rock, Ark.: Pioneer, 1950. 424 pp, v.

Includes biographical sketch of L.Q.C. Lamar of Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Campbell, Will D. Providence. Atlanta: Longstreet, 1992. 292 pp.

Traces the evolution of an area in Holmes County that began as Choctaw land, was an antebellum plantation, became the Providence cooperative interracial farm in the mid-twentieth century, and presently serves as a government-owned hunting refuge.


Candler, Warren A. Bishop Charles Betts Galloway. Nashville, Tenn.: Cokesbury, 1927. viii, 307 pp.

Biography of Methodist Bishop Galloway (1849-1909) includes discussion of his support of education for African Americans and his 1887 disagreement with Jefferson Davis over temperance.


Canfield, Cass. The Iron Will of Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1978. xiv, 146 pp.

Examines the political and personal implications of Davis's personality


Capati, Emelda Villacortes. "The Oxford Intelligencer: 1860-61." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1961. 125 l.

Based on extant issues of the Lafayette County newspaper, which may have ceased publication with the advent of the Civil War.


Capers, Charlotte, ed. "Notes and Documents: William H. McCardle's Account of the Great War Between the States." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 3 (July 1947): 174-81.

Manuscript rejected for inclusion in Robert Lowry and William H. McCardle's A History of Mississippi, 1891.


Capers, Charlotte. "Seraphs in the Sky." Delta Review 5, no. 9 (Sept. 1968): 49+.

History of Rodney (Jefferson Co.), formerly called Petit Gulf, a thriving antebellum cotton port that declined after the Mississippi River changed course.


Caraway, Margaret Roe. "The Cornerstone of Old Fort Maurepas." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 2 (Apr. 1951): 101-104.

Colonization plaque on the Harrison County fort.


Caraway, Margaret Roe. "The Story of Ship Island, 1699-1941." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no.2 (Apr. 1942): 76-83.

History of the Harrison County barrier island.


Caraway, Margaret Roe. "Where the Wild Grape Twines: A Story of the First White Settlement in the Lower Mississippi Valley (1699)." National Historical Magazine 73, no. 3 (Mar. 1939): 60-63.

Brief account of the landing of Pierre LeMoyne Sieur d'Iberville's expedition on the Gulf Coast at present-day Ocean Springs (Jackson Co.).


Carleton, Eleanor Beatrice. "The Establishment of the Electric Telegraph in Louisiana and Mississippi." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 31, no. 2 (Apr. 1948): 425-90.

Problems encountered in building telegraph lines in the late 1840s and early 1850s; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, Louisiana State University, 1942.


Carleton, Kenneth Hoffman. "Eighteenth-Century Trails in the Choctaw Territory of Mississippi and Alabama." M.A. thesis, University of Georgia, 1989. vii, 139 l.

Uses travel journals and maps to trace twenty-two trails and locate sixty-one Choctaw villages in East Central and Southeast Mississippi.


Carlson, Douglas Wiley. "Temperance Reform in the Cotton Kingdom." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1982. 331 l.

Shows that the reforming impulse was active in the antebellum South in the shape of the temperance movement in Mississippi, South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, 1830s-50s.


Carpenter, Alma. "A Note on the History of The Forest Plantation, Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 2 (May 1984): 130-37.

Refutes local Adams County lore by concluding that two houses, not one, were built at The Forest, neither of which was designed by owner William Dunbar; includes descriptions of the 1816 mansion and reactions to its destruction by fire in 1852.


Carpenter, Barbara, ed. Ethnic Heritage in Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi for the Mississippi Humanities Council, 1992. xii, 212 pp.

Essays by Jay K. Johnson, Patricia Galloway, Samuel J. Wells, Clara Sue Kidwell, Charles D. Lowery, Paul E. Hoffman, Robert S. Weddle, William Cash, Robert L. Jenkins, D.C. Young, and Stephen Young on Native Americans, African Americans, and more recent immigrant groups: Chinese, Lebanese, Italians, Vietnamese, Indians, Greeks, and Slavonians.


Carpenter, Howard. History of Booneville and Prentiss County. Booneville, Miss.: Milwick Printing, 1956. viii, 134 pp.

Present-day status of the area (emphasis on social and civic clubs) with brief political, economic, educational, and religious history.


Carpenter, Howard, ed. A History of Tate County. Senatobia, Miss.: B.C. Printing, 1975. ix, 358 pp.

Emphasizes business and family histories, but also includes information on early settlement, churches, organizations, and education.


Carpenter, Ronnie J. "Hodding Carter, Jr., and the Race Issue." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1983. vi, 95 l.

Examines editorial positions of Carter (1907-72) on race, especially desegregation in education, as editor and publisher of the Greenville Delta Democrat-Times, 1930s-60s.


Carriere, Marius M., Jr. "Mount Locust Plantation: The Development of Southwest Mississippi during the Frontier Period, 1810-1830." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 3 (Aug. 1986): 187-98.

Uses Mount Locust (Jefferson Co.) as an illustration of unpretentious frontier farms and demonstrates the effect on farmers of catastrophic events such as war and economic depression.


Carroll, Thomas Battle. Edited and amended by Alfred Benjamin Butts, Alfred William Garner, and Frederic Davis Melton. Historical Sketches of Oktibbeha County. Gulfport, Miss.: Dixie, 1931. xviii, 263 pp.

Emphasizes political history of the county, 1820-1928.


Carson, James Taylor. "State Rights and Indian Removal in Mississippi, 1817-1835." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 1 (Feb. 1995): 25-41.

Maintains that political wrangling over the removal of the Choctaws and Chickasaws helped to delineate the ideological differences that characterized the second two-party system and prefigured the states' rights arguments that were later applied to the issue of slavery.


Carter, Clarence E. "Some Aspects of British Administration in West Florida." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 1, no. 3 (Dec. 1914): 364-75.

The drawing of the northern boundary line, which ran through present-day South Mississippi, and the arrival of settlers in Natchez (Adams Co.) after about 1770.


Carter, Dan T. When the War Was Over: The Failure of Self-Reconstruction in the South, 1865-1867. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1985. xiv, 285 pp.

Includes scattered material on postbellum violence in Mississippi and the state's troubled economy and unreconstructed racial attitudes.


Carter, George E. "A Note on Jefferson Davis in Canada-His Stay in Lennoxville, Quebec." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 2 (May 1971): 133-39.

During his stay in a Canadian village, 1867-68, the former president of the Confederacy concerned himself with his family and with preparations for his pending trial.


Carter, Hodding, and Anthony Ragusin. Gulf Coast Country. N.Y.: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1951. viii, 247 pp.

Folk history of the coastal sections of Mississippi and Louisiana.


Carter, Hodding. Lower Mississippi. N.Y.: Farrar & Rinehart, 1942. x, 467 pp.

Informal history of the Lower Mississippi River Valley includes chapters on writer William Alexander Percy of Greenville (Washington Co.), surveyor Andrew Ellicott, the cities of Natchez (Adams Co.) and Mound Bayou (Bolivar Co.), the Civil War around Natchez and Vicksburg (Warren Co.), and Reconstruction.


Carter, Hodding. So the Heffners Left McComb. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1965. 142 pp.

Depicts threats and ostracism by Pike County residents in 1964 against the Albert W. Heffner family for allegedly holding racially liberal opinions.


Carter, Hodding, III. The South Strikes Back. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1959. 213 pp.

Undocumented narrative of the rise of the Citizens' Councils in Mississippi following the 1954 Brown decision.


Carter, John D. "Henry Stuart Foote in California Politics, 1854-1857." Journal of Southern History 9, no. 2 (May 1943): 224-37.

Foote resigned the governorship of Mississippi in 1854 and moved to California.


Carter, Samuel, III. The Final Fortress: The Campaign for Vicksburg, 1862-1863. N.Y.: St. Martin's, 1980. xi, 354 pp.

Narrative history of the siege and battle, which the author argues was the most important of the war.


Carter, William C., ed. Conversations with Shelby Foote. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1989. xviii, 276 pp.

Transcribed television interviews and previously published newspaper, magazine, and journal interviews with and articles about Foote (b. 1916), novelist and historian from Greenville (Washington Co.).


Cartledge, Connie Lynette. "James P. Coleman: Moderate Politician in an Age of Racial Strife, 1950-1965." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1984. vii, 87 l.

Problems that Coleman's moderate racial stance created for him in his roles as legislator, governor, and judge.


Casdorph, Paul D. "The 1912 Republican Presidential Campaign in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 1 (Feb. 1971): 1-19.

Examines former President Theodore Roosevelt's poorly sustained efforts to attract African American voters to his Progressive Party candidacy .


Castel, Albert. "Battle without a Victor…Iuka." Civil War Times Illustrated 11, no. 6 (Oct. 1942): 12-18.

Description of the Battle of Iuka (Tishomingo Co.), in which Confederate General Henry Little was killed and Union General William Rosecran's forces were defeated, September 19-20, 1862.


Castel, Albert. "Earl Van Dorn-A Personality Profile." Civil War Times Illustrated 6, no. 1 (Apr. 1967): 38-42.

Uneven military career of General Van Dorn, who commanded Pemberton's cavalry in North Mississippi, successfully raided Union supplies at Holly Springs (Marshall Co.) and Thompson's Station, lost the Battle of Corinth (Alcorn Co.), and was murdered in 1863.


Cate, Wirt Armistead. "Lamar and the Frontier Hypothesis." Journal of Southern History 1 (Feb.-Nov. 1935): 497-501.

Argues that historian Frederick Jackson Turner's 1893 essay, "The Frontier in American History," borrowed extensively from L.Q.C. Lamar's 1887 Calhoun Monument speech.


Cate, Wirt Armistead. Lucius Q.C. Lamar: Secession and Reunion. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1935. xiii, 594 pp.

Biography of Lamar (1825-93) emphasizes his advocacy of secession, his conciliatory eulogy of Charles Sumner in the House of Representatives, and his opposition to the free coinage of silver.


Catton, Bruce. "Grant at Shiloh." American Heritage 11, no. 2 (Feb. 1960): 65-78.

Includes discussion of the strategic importance of North Mississippi, particularly Corinth (Alcorn Co.), in the spring of 1862.


Catton, Bruce. Grant Moves South. Boston: Little, Brown, 1960. xi, 562 pp.

Volume two of the biography of U.S. Grant begun by Lloyd Lewis; chapters eighteen through twenty-three deal largely with the Union campaign for Vicksburg (Warren Co.), 1863.


Catton, Bruce. "Jefferson Davis: The Man Behind the Image." American Heritage 18, no. 4 (June 1967): 56-57, 79.

Analysis of the personality of a "tragic" figure follows him from president of the Confederate States of America to political prisoner, holder of various postwar jobs, memoirist, and icon of the Lost Cause.


Caughey, John. "The Natchez Rebellion of 1781 and Its Aftermath." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 16, no. 1 (Jan. 1933): 57-83.

Describes the Natchez-Chickasaw rebellions and their threat to Spanish control of Natchez, the Spanish capture of the rebellion leaders, and the Louisiana governor's efforts to suppress the uprisings.


Caughey, John W. "Willing's Expedition Down the Mississippi, 1778." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 15, no. 1 (Jan. 1932): 5-36.

James Willing's raid on British loyalists in Natchez, including description of his party and vessel, the property they seized, and the subsequent flight of some Natchez residents to Spanish territory.


Causey, Jerry. "Confederate Scars: The Marks Southern Interstate Sectionalism Made upon the Confederacy." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1978. vi, 213 l.

Includes material on sectionalism in Mississippi.


Causey, Virginia Estes. "Glen Allan, Mississippi: Change and Continuity in a Delta Community, 1900 to 1950." Ph.D. dissertation, Emory University, 1983. 108 l.

Examines the effect of social progress and modernization on the society and economy of a Washington County town.


Cavanagh, John Carroll. "The Operations of Major-General Henry W. Halleck's Union Army in the Corinth Campaign of 1862." M.A. thesis, Columbia University, 1959. 61 l.

Analysis of Union tactics at the Siege of Corinth; Halleck was a disciple of European military strategist Baron Henri Jomini.


Centennial Book Committee. Leflore County, Mississippi, Centennial, 1871-1971. Greenwood, Miss.: n.p., 1971. 68 pp.

Includes brief history of the county and over one hundred vintage photographs.


"Center Point Presbyterian Church." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 38 (June 1986): 5-6.

History of the congregation, 1846-1914.


Chafe, William H. Never Stop Running: Allard Lowenstein and the Struggle to Save American Liberalism. N.Y.: Basic Books, 1993. xix, 556 pp.

Biography of the liberal activist (1929-80); chapter eight, "Mississippi Freedom Summer," deals with his troubled involvement with the 1964 voter registration campaign and with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party's challenge to the 1964 Democratic National Convention.


Chalmers, David M. Hooded Americanism: The First Century of the Ku Klux Klan: 1865-1965. N.Y.: Doubleday, 1965. xii, 420 pp.

Chapter nine, "Mississippi: Fiery Crosses on the Levee," briefly describes the rebirth of the anti-Catholic Klan in the 1920s and the vocal opposition of former U.S. senators Leroy Percy and John Sharp Williams.




Chalybeate Woman's Club. The Origin and History of Chalybeate, Mississippi. N.p.: Tippah County Historical and Genealogical Society, 1975. 54 pp.

Histories of Chalybeate and Jonesborough emphasize churches and clubs.


Chambers, Henry E. "William Charles Cole Claiborne, Governor of Mississippi and First Governor of Louisiana: How He Solved America's First Problem of Expansion." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 247-59.

Title refers to Claiborne's tenure as governor of Louisiana, but the article also includes information about his early life and brief governorship of Mississippi, 1801-1804.


Chambers, Moreau Browne Congleton. "History of Fort Panmure at Natchez, 1763-1789." M.A. thesis, Duke University, 1942. 136 l.

Fort Rosalie, which was mostly deserted after the 1729 massacre of French settlers, was occupied by the British after the Treaty of Paris, renamed Fort Panmure, and made an important port on the new border between British and Spanish territories; thesis also includes a chapter on the Willing Raid.


Chan, Kit Mui L. "The Chinese-Americans in the Mississippi Delta." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 1 (Feb. 1973): 29-35.

Reviews the history of the Delta Chinese, whose ancestors came to the area in 1872-75; based on the author's master's thesis, "Assimilation of the Chinese-Americans in the Mississippi Delta," Mississippi State University, 1969.


Chance, Joseph E. Jefferson Davis's Mexican War Regiment. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1991. xiii, 220 pp.

Regimental history of the successful 1st Mississippi Volunteer Regiment ("Mississippi Rifles"), 1846-48; includes list of personnel.


Chance, Russell James. "Alexander Melvourne Jackson: Mississippi Lawyer, Editor, Soldier, and Politician, 1823-1857." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1970. 381 l.

Life of the Ripley (Tippah Co.) lawyer and newspaper editor concentrates on his political interests prior to his 1857 appointment as secretary of the New Mexico Territory.


Chandler, Julian Alvin Carroll, ed. The South in the Building of the Nation. Richmond, Va.: Southern Historical, 1909. 12 vols.

"The History of Mississippi" in volume two includes chapters by Peter J. Hamilton, Dunbar Rowland, and Franklin Lafayette Riley.


Chappell, Gordon T. "Some Patterns of Land Speculation in the Old Southwest." Journal of Southern History 5, no. 4 (Nov. 1949): 463-77.

Latter pages deal with the Chocchuma Land Company, which was organized in 1833 to buy and resell land ceded by the Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians.


Chase, Carroll. "The First Hundred Years of United States Territorial Postmarks, 1787-1887: Mississippi Territory." American Philatelist 55, no. 1 (Jan. 1942): 220-26.

Includes list of postmarks and post offices, 1798-1817.


Cheatham, Edgar Jones, Jr. "Washington County, Mississippi: Its Antebellum Generation." M.A. thesis, Tulane University, 1950. v, 160 l.

Glimpses of the lives of settlers, 1825-60.


Cherry, Gwendolyn, Ruby Thomas, and Pauline Willis. Portraits in Color: The Lives of Colorful Negro Women. N.Y.: Pageant, 1962. 224 pp.

Includes brief sketch of the life of soprano Leontyne Price of Laurel (Jones Co.).


Chesebrough, David B. "Dissenting Clergy in Confederate Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 2 (May 1993): 115-31.

Activities of Unionist and anti-secessionist clergy (mostly Presbyterians), including John W. Harmon and James Pelan of Macon (Noxubee Co.), John H. Aughey of Choctaw and Attala counties, James A. Lyon of Columbus (Lowndes Co.), and a Reverend Galladet of Aberdeen (Monroe Co.).


Chesteen, Richard Dallas. "Change and Reaction in a Mississippi Delta Civil Community." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1976. 809 l.

Studies the process of modernization in Indianola (Sunflower Co.) since the 1930s.


Chesteen, Richard D. "'Mississippi is Gone Home': A Study of the 1948 Mississippi States' Rights Bolt." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 1 (Feb. 1970): 43-59.

Discusses the withdrawal of the Mississippi delegation from the 1948 Democratic National Convention after their failure to remove the civil rights plank from the party platform.


Chickasaw County Historical and Genealogical Society. A History of Chickasaw County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1985. iii, 626 pp.

Includes history of communities, but most of the volume consists of family histories.


Chisholm, J. Julian. History of the First Presbyterian Church of Natchez, Mississippi. Natchez, Miss.: McDonald's, 1972. [vi], 171 pp.

Sesquicentennial history, 1817-1967, includes information on finances, missionaries and pastors, schools, sermons, building, and African American members.


Chrestman, Mary, comp. Mississippi County Histories: A Bibliography. University: University of Mississippi Library, 1976. 42 pp.

Listing by county of primary and secondary material, including newspaper articles.


"Churches and Ministers, 1834-1840." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 29 (Mar. 1984): 6-7.

Very brief listing of Methodist, Baptist, and Primitive Baptist congregations.


Chute, William J. Damn Yankee! The First Career of Frederick A.P. Bernard. Port Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat, 1978.; ix, 214 pp.

Final three chapters deal with Barnard's tenure as the third president of the University of Mississippi, 1855-61.


Claiborne, J.F.H. Life and Correspondence of John A. Quitman, Major-General, U.S.A., and Governor of the State of Mississippi. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1860. 2 vols.

Earliest biography of the secessionist statesman (1799-1858).


Claiborne, J.F.H. Life and Times of Gen. Sam Dale, the Mississippi Partisan. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1860. xiii, 233 pp.

Biography, mostly written as autobiography, of Dale (1722-1841), who fought in the Creek War of 1813-14 and represented Lauderdale County in the Mississippi legislature in the 1830s.


Claiborne, John F.H. Mississippi, as a Province, Territory and State with Biographical Notices of Eminent Citizens. Jackson, Miss.: Power and Barksdale, 1880. xxiii, 545 pp.

Political history of Mississippi from de Soto to early statehood; includes a chapter on Native Americans.


Clark, Eric Charles. "Industrial Development and State Government Policy in Mississippi, 1890-1980." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1989. 399 l.

Changing attitude of state government toward industrialization, exemplified by Governor Hugh L. White's Balance Agriculture with Industry program, introduced in 1936.


Clark, Eric C. "Legislative Apportionment in the 1890 Constitutional Convention." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 4 (Nov. 1980): 298-315.

Demonstrates, using census data, that reapportionment alone would not have established the "permanent white intelligent rule" in the state legislature that the 1890 convention promised to deliver.


Clark, Eric C. "Legislative Adoption of BAWI, 1936." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 4 (Nov. 1990): 283-99.

Portrays the Balance Agriculture with Industry program as a largely successful attempt by state government to improve the economy by attracting new industry.


Clark, Eric Charles. "The Mississippi Constitutional Convention of 1890: A Political Analysis." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1975. iv, 209 l.

Concludes that the constitution disfranchised African American as well as white citizens and allowed majority-black counties, by then greatly reduced in numbers of registered voters and controlled by conservatives, to retain their positions of power in the state legislature.


Clark, Eric C. "Regulation of Corporations in the Mississippi Constitutional Convention of 1890." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 1 (Feb. 1986): 31-41.

Reviews discussion among convention delegates surrounding corporate regulation and reveals the outdated and sometimes contradictory nature of the document.


Clark, Garth, Robert A. Ellison, Jr., and Eugene Hecht. Photography by John White. The Mad Potter of Biloxi: The Art and Life of George E. Ohr. N.Y.: Abbeville, 1989. 192 pp.

Brief biography of Ohr (1857-1918) of Biloxi (Harrison Co.) followed by extensive discussion of his work; includes many large color illustrations.


Clark, T.D. "The Slave Trade between Kentucky and the Cotton Kingdom." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 21, no. 3 (Dec. 1934): 331-42.

Includes mention of the slave trade in Natchez (Adams Co.) beginning about 1818.


Clark, Thomas D. "The Country Newspaper: A Factor in Southern Opinion, 1865-1930." Journal of Southern History 14, no. 1 (Feb. 1948): 3-33.

Analyzes a broad sample of southern newspapers, including the Forrest (Co.) Register, the Senatobia (Tate Co.) North Mississippi Democrat, and the Jackson (Hinds Co.) Clarion; cites editors, including James K. Vardaman and Theodore G. Bilbo, as sources of influence in the period.


Clark, Thomas D., and John D.W. Guice. Frontiers in Conflict: The Old Southwest, 1795-1830. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1989. xvi, 335 pp.

Argues that the Old Southwest region, including Mississippi, possessed the most enduring frontier in American history, as backward conditions persisted in some isolated counties well into the twentieth century.


Clark, Thomas D. A Pioneer Southern Railroad from New Orleans to Cairo. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1936. 171 pp.

History of the building of early southern railroads, mostly within the borders of the state of Mississippi, that were eventually taken over by the Illinois Central system.


Clarke, Hewitt. Thunder at Meridian: A True Story of Courage and Violence in the Deepest South: Meridian, Mississippi, 1695-1995. Spring, Tex.: Lone Star, 1995. 390 pp.

Vignettes of Meridian and Lauderdale County history, including material on Native Americans, the Civil War, and the Ku Klux Klan.


"Clark Lewis, Member of Congress from Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 5 (Mar. 1978): 8.

Very brief sketch of Lewis (1840-96), the only Noxubee Countian to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives.


Classen, Steven Douglas. "Broadcast Law and Segregation: A Social History of the WLBT-TV Case." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1995. iv, 258 l.

Places the 1955-69 controversy over programming at the Jackson (Hinds Co.) television station within the context of the issues of the day.


Claussen, E. Neal. "John Sharp Williams: Pacesetter for Democratic Keynoters." Southern Speech Journal 31, no. 1 (Fall 1965): 1-9.

Considers Representative Williams's keynote address to the 1904 Democratic convention in St. Louis to have been the prototype of the modern keynote.


Clay, Mary Harrison. "Gideon Lincecum, Southern Pioneer, 1793-1874." M.S. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1953. 169 l.

Includes coverage of Lincecum's Mississippi years, 1818-48, during which he practiced herbal medicine, traded with the Choctaws, mastered their language, and helped to settle Monroe County.


Clay County History Book Committee. History of Clay County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1988. v, 862 pp.

History of West Point and smaller communities; much of the volume consists of family histories.


Clayton, A.M. Centennial Address on the History of Marshall County Delivered by A.M. Clayton at Holly Springs, Mississippi, August 12th, 1876. Washington: R.O. Polkinhorn, 1880. 32 pp.

History of the county, which was forty years old at the time of the address.


Clayton, Bruce, and John Salmond, eds. Varieties of Southern History: New Essays on a Region and Its People. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1996. xiv, 200 pp.

Includes essay by Terence Finnegan, "Who Were the Victims of Lynchings? Evidence from Mississippi and South Carolina, 1881-1940."


Clayton, Hon. Claude F. "The Dedication of the Last Courthouse of Old Tishomingo County at Jacinto, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 3 (Aug. 1969): 172-86.

Address on the history of the original Tishomingo County (present-day Alcorn, Prentiss, and Tishomingo counties).


Clayton, Lawrence A., Vernon James Knight, and Edward C. Moore, eds. The de Soto Chronicles: The Expedition of Hernando de Soto to North America in 1539-1543. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1993. 2 vols.

Reprints documents, but volume one also includes extensive bibliography of de Soto studies by Jeffrey P. Brain and Charles R. Ewen.


Clear Creek Baptist Church: A Sesquicentennial History, 1836-1986. N.p., [1986]. 22 pp.

History of the Lafayette County congregation.


Cleggett, D.A.H. "An Instance of Plagiarism by President Jefferson Davis." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 72, no. 4 (Oct. 1964): 490-95.\

Argues that Davis's Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881) "borrowed extensively" from General Robert E. Lee's battle reports.


Cliatt, James Edward, III. "Lindamood and Puckett, Trading as Columbus Brick Company." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1967. 250 l.

Business history of the Columbus Brick Company in Lowndes County includes information on founders William S. Lindamood (1861-1919) and Willis N. Puckett (b. 1867).


Cliatt, James Edward, III. "The Republican Party in Mississippi, 1952-1960." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1964. 79 l.

Conflict between the "Black and Tan" faction under African American national committeeman Perry Howard and the emerging-and eventually victorious-"Lily White" faction.


Clifft, Joseph Clinton. "Pawns of the Game: The Role of the Chickasaws in United States-Spanish Relations, 1783-1803." M.A. thesis, Memphis State University, 1992. 138 l.

Illustrates the competition for Indian alliances by the two nations as they sought to control the region.


Clift, Charles. "The WLBT-TV Case, 1964-1969: An Historical Analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana University, 1976. 449 l.

Follows the years of litigation of the suit against the Jackson (Hinds Co.) television station for discriminating against its African American viewers.


Clifton, Ann D. "A Demographic Study of Bolivar County in 1860." Journal of the Bolivar County Historical Society 1 (Mar. 1977): 10-20.

Entirely based on census data.


Clinton, Anita. "Stephen Arnold Douglas-His Mississippi Experience." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 2 (May 1988): 56-88.

Although his wife and sons actually owned them, the Illinois senator controlled slaveholding plantations in Lawrence and Washington counties, Mississippi, from 1848 to 1861.


The Coast of Mississippi: Its Past and Progress. Baton Rouge, La.: Moran, 1982. 120 pp.

Heavily illustrated popular history of Hancock, Jackson, and Harrison counties, 1600s-1981.


Coates, Robert M. The Outlaw Years: The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace. N.Y.: Macaulay, 1930. 308 pp.

Undocumented popular account of outlaws on the Natchez Trace from the 1790s to the 1830s: Micajah and Wiley Harpe, Joe Hare, Samuel Mason, and John A. Murrell.


Cobb, Edwin L. "Powhatan Ellis of Mississippi: A Reappraisal." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no 2 (May 1968): 91-110.

Sympathetic assessment of the life of Ellis (1790-1863), jurist, U.S. senator, and minister to Mexico.


Cobb, James C. The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1992. xiv, 391 pp.

History of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta with additional chapters on blues music and the literary concentration in Greenville (Washington Co.); argues that economy, not isolation, is the key to the Delta's identity as the "South's South."


Cobb, James C. The Selling of the South: The Southern Crusade for Industrial Development, 1936-1980. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1982. xi, 293 pp.

Includes many mentions of Mississippi and a chapter on the Balance Agriculture with Industry subsidy program, which was initiated in 1936 by Governor Hugh White.


Cobb, James C. "'Somebody Done Nailed Us on the Cross': Federal Farm and Welfare Policy and the Civil Rights Movement in the Mississippi Delta." Journal of American History 77, no. 3 (Dec. 1990): 912-36.

Unintended effects, beginning in the 1960s, of the food stamp program, minimum wage laws, price supports, and acreage reduction; without land redistribution, the resultant mechanization and labor reductions by planters led to unemployment, greater poverty, and eventual outmigration of many Deltans.


Cobb, James C. "The South's South: The Enigma of Creativity in the Mississippi Delta." Southern Review 25, no. 1 (Jan. 1989): 72-85.

Describes self-indulgent whites, despairing blacks, anti-modernization, and the unusual landscape of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta; argues that the area represents a distillation of troublesome characteristics of the larger region and nation.


Cochran, Caroline. "The Congressional Career of Private John Allen, 1884-1901." M.A. thesis, Vanderbilt University, 1938. 79 l.

Reviews bills introduced, speeches delivered, and committee assignments of Representative John Mills Allen (1846-1917), who is remembered chiefly for his humorous speeches.


Cochran, Curtis Norban. "Hugh L. White and the Inauguration of the BAWI program in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1950. 89 l.

Political and economic origin of the Balance Agriculture with Industry incentive program, instituted by Governor White in 1936.


Cochran, Fan Alexander, ed. and comp. History of Old Tishomingo County, Mississippi Territory. Oklahoma City, Okla.: Barnhart Letter Shop, 1969. 377 pp.

History of the present-day counties of Tishomingo, Alcorn, and Prestiss, 1836-70, based largely on county court records; includes brief biographical sketches and information on county government, sensational trials, schools, and tax assessment for slaves.


Cochran, Hamilton. Noted American Duels and Hostile Encounters. Philadelphia: Chilton, 1963. vii, 319 pp.

Includes mention of Mississippi duels fought by a Colonel McClung in 1834 and the late 1840s and another involving James Bowie aboard the Orleans on the Mississippi River near Natchez (Adams Co.) in 1832.


Cockrell, Thomas D. "Meadow Woods Plantation: A Study in Transition." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 4 (Nov. 1990): 301-23.

Overview of the economic and social life of the Rice family of Oktibbeha County; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "'Meadow Woods,' 1839-1989: A Mississippi Plantation," Mississippi State University, 1989.


Cockrell, Thomas D. "Mississippi's Congressional Delegation and National Politics, 1828-1836." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1981. 104 l.

Involvement of U.S. Senator George Poindexter and Representative Franklin E. Plummer in the national issues of the day (treaties, land distribution, tariffs, banks, states' rights); disputes Edwin A. Miles's contention that President Andrew Jackson dominated state politics in the period.


Cockrell, Thomas D. "The Politics of Land in Jacksonian Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 1 (Feb. 1985): 1-14.

Portrays as emblematic of the pro- and anti-Andrew Jackson sentiment of the day: the political debate over dispensation of Indian lands ceded by treaty in the 1830s and the conflict between Senator George Poindexter and Representative Franklin E. Plummer.


Cockrell, Thomas D. "United States Senators and Representatives from Mississippi, 1828-1836: An Introduction." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 1 (Feb. 1987): 35-48.

Identifies Senator George Poindexter and Representative Franklin E. Plummer as the key Mississippi political figures of the period.


Coffer, Donald S. "Confederate Torpedo Warfare." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1970. 86 l.

Includes mention of the 1863 torpedoing of the ironclads U.S.S. Cairo near Vicksburg (Warren Co.) and the U.S.S. Baron DeKalb near Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.).


Cofield, Jack. William Faulkner: The Cofield Collection. Oxford, Miss.: Yoknapatawpha, 1978. xi, 196 pp.

Extensive collection including descriptive text of Faulkner and Oxford photographs, many taken by "Colonel" J.R. Cofield.


Coker, William Leon. "Cotton and Faith: A Social and Political View of Mississippi Wartime Finance, 1861-1865." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oklahoma, 1973. 349 l.

Financial structure of the state and public reaction to problems such as devaluation of currency and scarcity of goods.


Coker, William Sidney. "Pat Harrison: The Formative Years." Journal of Mississippi History 25, no. 4 (Oct. 1963): 251-78.

Byron Patton Harrison's activities in the U.S. House of Representatives, 1911-19; based on the author's master's thesis, "Pat Harrison, the Formative Years, 1911-1919," University of Southern Mississippi, 1962.


Coker, William Sidney. "Pat Harrison's Efforts to Reopen the Choctaw Citizenship Rolls." Southern Quarterly 3, no. 1 (Oct. 1964): 36-61.

Representative Harrison (1881-1941) worked from 1912 to 1916 to allow Mississippi Choctaws to register as members of their tribe and was instrumental in the passage of congressional appropriations that benefited the Choctaw Nation.


Coker, William S. "Pat Harrison-Strategy for Victory." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 4 (Nov. 1966): 267-85.

Characterization of Harrison's political campaign strategy, 1916-37.


Coker, William S. "Peter Bryan Bruin of Bath: Soldier, Judge and Frontiersman." West Virginia History 30, no. 4 (July 1969): 579-85.

Includes biographical sketch of Bruin (1754?-1826 or 1827), Mississippi territorial judge, 1798-1809.


Coker, William S. "Ralph Humphreys: Patriarch of the Mississippi Humphreyses." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 1 (Feb. 1975): 67-85.

Life of Humphreys (1748-90), grandfather of Governor Benjamin Grubb Humphreys.


Coker, William L. Repudiation and Reaction: Tilghman Tucker and the Mississippi Bond Question. N.p.: the author, 1969. 93 pp.

Focuses on the gubernatorial administration, 1842-44, of Tucker (d. 1859), including the major issues of his tenure: repudiation of state bonds and the embezzlement scandal involving State Treasurer Richard S. Graves; based on the author's master's thesis, "The Election and Administration of Tilghman M. Tucker, Governor of Mississippi, 1842-1844," University of Southern Mississippi, 1968.\\


Coker, William S. "Research Possibilities and Resources for a Study of Spanish Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 2 (May 1972): 117-28.

Lists relevant manuscript collections in or near Mississippi.


Coker, William S. "Research in the Spanish Borderlands: Mississippi, 1779-1798." Latin American Research Review 7, no. 2 (Summer 1972): 40-54.

Historiography, availability of primary sources, and suggestions for research.


Coker, William S. "Spanish Regulation of the Natchez Indigo Industry, 1793-1794: The South's First Antipollution Laws?" Technology and Culture 13, no. 1 (Jan. 1972): 55-58.

Deals with regulations imposed by Spanish Governor Manuel Luis Gayoso de Lemos involving the dumping of waste from indigo dye production into waterways and the transition from indigo to cotton as the dominant cash crop.


Coker, William L. "The United States Senate Investigation of the Mississippi Election of 1875." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 2 (May 1975): 143-63.

Political wrangling over whether to investigate the violent election in which Republican rule was overthrown.


Coker, William L. Valley of Springs: The Story of Iuka. Hattiesburg: University of Southern Mississippi, 1968. vii, 83 pp.

History of the Tishomingo County town.


Colby, David C. "Black Power, White Resistance, and Public Policy: Political Power and Poverty Program Grants in Mississippi." Journal of Politics 47, no. 2 (May 1985): 579-95.

Quantitative study of political factors affecting federal poverty program grant distribution in 1968 and 1972.


Colby, David C. "The Voting Rights Act and Black Registration in Mississippi." Publius 16, no. 4 (Fall 1986): 123-37.

Quantitative analysis of the impact of the 1965 Voting Rights Act on African American registration finds that Mississippi counties with the lowest registration rates before 1965 saw the greatest gains in succeeding decades.


Cole, Fred Carrington. "The Early Life of Thomas Affleck, 1813-1842." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1936. ii, 145 l.

Childhood in Scotland, immigration to the U.S., and work on farm journals before moving to the South, where Affleck became a pioneer in the improvement of agricultural methods.


Cole, James Durwood. "Origin of the White Population of Lafayette County." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1935. 54 l.

Based entirely on questioning of residents about their ancestors; tabulates country of origin, immigration dates, and slaveholding status.


Coleman, Edward Clarke, Jr. "Reconstruction in Attala County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 147-61.

Recounts the "unique" position of the county, in which no freedmen were elected to office, Ku Klux Klan activity was minimal, and local Republicans controlled the county government.


Coleman, J.P. Choctaw County Chronicles: A History of Choctaw County, Mississippi, 1830-1973. Ackerman, Miss.: the author, 1973. 483 pp.

County history includes list of prominent citizens.


Coleman, J.P. "The Origin of the Constitution of 1890." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1957): 69-72.

Address by Governor Coleman to the Mississippi Historical Society discusses obstacles faced by legislative supporters of a constitutional convention.


Coleman, James P. "Two Irascible Antebellum Senators: George Poindexter and Henry S. Foote." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 1 (Feb. 1984): 17-27.

Poindexter verbally attacked Daniel Webster and Andrew Jackson in 1833 and Foote clashed with Thomas Hart Benton in 1850.


Coleman, Mary Delorse. "Legislators, Law, and Public Policy: Political Change in Mississippi and the South since Connor v. Johnson." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1990. 244 l.

Examines legislative attitudes and voting behavior by race since the advent of single-member districts in 1978; concentrates on selected roll call votes in Mississippi in the 1980s.


Coleman, Michael C. Presbyterian Missionary Attitudes toward American Indians, 1837-1893. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1985. x, 222 pp.

Chapter four includes information on Choctaw origins.


Colliflower, Charles E. "A Checklist of Mississippi Imprints from 1831 through 1840, with a Historical Introduction of the Period." M.A. thesis, Catholic University, 1950. v, 126 l.

Includes brief historical overview and early history of printing in the state.


Collins, Herbert. "The Southern Industrial Gospel before 1860." Journal of Southern History 12, no. 3 (Aug. 1946): 386-402.

Early advocacy of industrialization and crop diversification, which attempted to improve the lives of the region's yeomen; includes description of an unsuccessful plan to introduce cotton mills into Mississippi.


Comejo, Peter. Racism, Revolution, Reaction, 1861-1877: The Rise and Fall of Radical Reconstruction. N.Y.: Monad, 1976. 269 pp.

Marxist account of Reconstruction includes chapter seven, "Counterrevolution-the Mississippi Model," which describes the era's violence, especially in Meridian (Lauderdale Co.).


Conerly, Luke Ward. Pike County, Mississippi, 1789-1876: Pioneer Families and Confederate Soldiers, Reconstruction and Redemption. Nashville, Tenn.: Brandon, 1909. 368 pp,

Early history focuses particularly on the Civil War and Reconstruction, including information on county residents who served in the war.


Conn, William Lance. "Crises in Black and White: The McComb, Mississippi, Enterprise-Journal's Coverage of Racial News, 1961-64." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1991. vi, 137 l.

Examines editorials and news stories during the civil rights movement and describes circumstances that led editor Oliver Emmerich to adopt a more liberal racial stance following Freedom Summer.


Connelly, Thomas L. "Vicksburg: Strategic Point or Propaganda Device?" Military Affairs 34 (Apr. 1970): 49-53.

Questions the view that the 1863 fall of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) represented the turning point of the Civil War.


Connolly, Michael Brian. "Reconstruction in Kemper County." M.A. thesis, Old Dominion University, 1989. iv, 168 l.

Includes a chapter on the end of Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction violence, including the Chisholm Massacre of 1877.


Connor, Ruth Corinne. "Gentleman Phil: Eighteenth-Century Opportunist Philip Peter Livingston, 1740-1810." M.A. thesis, Auburn University, 1982. 168 l.

Focuses on the years Livingston spent in British West Florida, 1770-79, where he held a variety of official posts and owned large tracts of land in what is now Southwest Mississippi.


Conover, Bettie Jones. "British West Florida's Mississippi Frontier Posts, 1763-1779." Alabama Review 29, no. 3 (July 1976): 177-207.

Includes material on Fort Panmure at Natchez (Adams Co.) and the 1778 Willing Raid; based on the author's master's thesis, "British West Florida's Mississippi Frontier during the American Revolution," Auburn University, 1972.


Conte, Bob. Portrait of American Music: Great Twentieth-Century Musicians. Portland, Me.: J. Weston Walch, 1989. xiv, 180 pp.

Includes section on country music pioneer Jimmie Rodgers of Meridian (Lauderdale Co.).


Coody, A.S. "Repair of and Changes in the Old Capitol." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 2 (Apr. 1949): 87-103.

Built in the 1840s, the Jackson (Hinds Co.) building was restored in 1916-18.


Cook, Hartwell, ed. Hazelhurst, Copiah County, Mississippi. N.p.: the author, 1985. 382 pp.

Includes a brief county history, but the bulk of the volume is devoted to photographs, newspaper articles, memoirs, and family histories.


Cooke, James J. "Flight into Fantasy: History of the Present Day Ku Klux Klan." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1966. vii, 143 l.

History and background of the modern Klan, 1930-65, especially in the Deep South.


Cooley, Ruby E. "A History of the Mississippi Penal Farm System, 1890-1935: Punishment, Politics, and Profit in Penal Affairs." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1981. ii, 202 l.

Heyday and demise of the convict lease system and the development of the penal farm system that supplanted it.


Cooper, Arnold. Between Struggle and Hope: Four Black Educators in the South, 1894-1915. Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1989. x, 121 pp.

Includes chapters on William H. Holtzclaw of Utica Institute (Hinds Co.) and Laurence C. Jones of Piney Woods County Life School (Rankin Co.); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Five Black Educators: Founders of Schools in the South, 1881-1915," Iowa State University, 1983.


Cooper, Arnold. "The Tuskegee Machine in Action: Booker T. Washington's Influence on Utica Institute, 1903-1915." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 4 (Nov. 1986): 283-95.

Washington's influence on William Henry Holtzclaw, founder of Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, and the friction that arose between the two men over Holtzclaw's relationship with the Association of Negro Industrial and Secondary Schools.


Cooper, Arnie. "'We Rise upon the Structure We Ourselves Have Builded': William H. Holtzclaw and Utica Institute, 1903-1915." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 1 (Feb. 1985): 15-33.

Establishment of the Hinds County school, which was modeled on Tuskegee Institute; includes information on founder Holtzclaw's boyhood and the policies, curriculum, and extension activities of the school.


Cooper, Forrest. "Reconstruction in Scott County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 13 (1913): 99-221.

Includes statistics on slaves and slaveholders as well as information about politics, the economy, labor, the Loyal Leagues, the Freedmen's Bureau, and the Ku Klux Klan.


Cooper, J. Wesley. Ante-Bellum Houses of Natchez. Natchez, Miss.: Southern Historical Publications, 1970. 208 pp.

Photographs, histories, and floorplans of fifty-four houses and other antebellum structures in Natchez (Adams Co.).


Cooper, J. Wesley. Natchez: A Treasure of Antebellum Homes. [Natchez, Miss.]: Southern Historical Publications, 1957. 159 pp.

Old photographs and descriptions of thirty-five antebellum houses.


Cooper, Mrs. A.L. [Rufus Henley]. "Fairview-Just After World War I." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 20 (Dec. 1981): 4-5.

Describes the community in the early 1920s.


Cooper, William J., Jr. Jefferson Davis, American. N.Y.: Alfred A. Knopf, 2000. 757 pp.

Portrays the president of the Confederate States of America as a tragic and somewhat pathetic figure.


Cooper, William J., Jr. "A Reassessment of Jefferson Davis as War Leader: The Case from Atlanta to Nashville." Journal of Southern History 36, no. 2 (May 1970): 189-214.

Examines Davis's relationships with his generals.


Cora, Spiro Pete. "A History of Holmes County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1969. x, 135 l.

Covers 1820s-1960s, including founding, politics, economy, and social and cultural life; mentions Hazel Brannon Smith, the controversial editor of the Lexington Advertiser in the 1950s.


Corley, James Buren. "The History of Hinds County Baptist Association, 1920-1967." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1968. iv, 130 l.

Development and activities of the association since its founding.


Corliss, Carlton J. Main Line at Mid-America: The Story of the Illinois Central. N.Y.: Creative Age, 1950. xviii, 490 pp.

Business history written to commemorate the railroad's centennial.


Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army. A Brief History of the Establishment and Development of the Waterways Experiment Station, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army. Vicksburg, Miss.: Waterways Experiment Station, 1954. 19 l.

Brief history of the station, which was founded in response to the devastating 1927 Mississippi River flood.


"Corpus Christi Church." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 28 (Dec. 1983): 1-3.

Catholic church in Macon, 1870s-1930s.


Cortner, Richard C. A "Scottsboro" Case in Mississippi: The Supreme Court and Brown v. Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1986. 174 pp.

Argues that the1936 decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court reversed for the first time a state criminal conviction that rested upon a coerced confession, anticipated the Miranda decision and laid the foundation for the Court's protection of civil liberties.


Cotterill, R.S. "The Beginnings of Railroads in the Southwest." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 8, no. 4 (Mar. 1922): 318-26.

Outlines the importance of the decade of the 1830s to subsequent antebellum railroad building in Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee.


Cotterill, R.S. "Federal Indian Management in the South, 1789-1825." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 20, no. 3 (Dec. 1933): 333-52.

Covers government policy from the era when half of the South was held by Native Americans to the time when the government began to resort to force to secure the land.


Cotterill, R.S. "The National Land System in the South, 1803-1812." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 16, no. 4 (Mar. 1930): 495-506.

Complicated sale of public lands in the Mississippi Territory, including present-day Alabama.


Cotterill, R.S. "Southern Railroads, 1850-1860." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 10, no. 4 (Mar. 1924): 396-405.

Significance of southern railroad development in the 1850s, which mainly involved building north-south lines in Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee (New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern, and Mobile and Ohio railroads).


Cotterill, R.S. The Southern Indians: The Story of the Civilized Tribes Before Removal. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1954. Vol. 38 of The Civilization of the American Indian. xiii, 255 pp.

Cherokees, Choctaws, Creeks, and Chickasaws in Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, the Carolinas, and Georgia, 1700s-1830.


Cotterill, Robert S. "A Chapter of Panton, Leslie and Company." Journal of Southern History 10, no. 3 (Aug. 1944): 275-92.

British firm that dominated Indian trade in the Floridas and along the Mississippi River, 1794-1812.


Cotterill, Robert S. "The Virginia-Chickasaw Treaty of 1783." Journal of Southern History 8, no. 4 (Nov. 1942): 483-96.

Examination of the treaty involving Chickasaws living in what is now Mississippi offers a glimpse into frontier history in the late 1700s, including land speculation, invasion of Kentucky, and conflict between Britain and Spain in the Southwest.


Cotton, Frank E., Jr. "Recent Trends in Manufacturing Employment in Mississippi, 1940-1960." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 1 (Feb. 1967): 28-42.

Documents the movement away from agricultural employment in the period; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Major Changes in the Mississippi Labor Force, Their Causes and Effects," University of Pittsburgh, 1962.


Cotton, Gordon. Asbury: A History. Vicksburg, Miss.: the author, 1994. 180 pp.

History of a defunct Warren County Methodist church and its adjacent cemetery, 1823-1910; includes information on several church members buried there.


Cotton, Gordon A. Of Primitive Faith and Order: A History of the Mississippi Primitive Baptist Church, 1780-1974. Raymond, Miss.: Keith, 1974. xii, 144 pp.

Explanation of beliefs and history of congregations; based on the author's master's thesis, "Mississippi Primitive Baptists, 1791-1964," Mississippi College, 1965.


Couch, R. Randall. "William Charles Cole Claiborne: An Historiographical Review." Louisiana History 36, no. 4 (Fall 1995): 453-65.

Books, articles, and dissertations about Claiborne, who served as governor of Mississippi Territory; most of the article's citations refer to his governorship of Louisiana.


Couch, Robert F. "The Ingalls Story in Mississippi, 1938-1958." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 3 (Aug. 1964): 192-206.

Emphasis on the selection of Pascagoula (Jackson Co.) as the site for Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation's initial venture, and also covers wartime and postwar contracts; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, University of Southern Mississippi, 1960.


"Could Have Danced All Night." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 33 (Mar. 1985): 2-3.

Entertainment in Macon, 1915-28.


Coulter, E. Merton. "Amnesty for All Except Jefferson Davis: The Hill-Blaine Debate of 1876." Georgia Historical Quarterly 56, no. 4 (Winter 1972): 453-94.

Fierce wrangling over the congressional bill to grant amnesty to Confederate leaders other than Jefferson Davis.


Coulter, E. Merton. "Jefferson Davis and the Northeast Georgia Fair." Georgia Historical Quarterly 50, no. 3 (Sept. 1966): 253-75.

Humorous account of the fawning over Jefferson Davis and his family by officials of the Macon Fair and Northeast Georgia Fair committees, 1887.


Counce, Louise M. Footsteps in the Sands of Time: A History of Southside, Trinity, and Christ United Methodist Church, Corinth, Mississippi. N.p., 1995. 308, [109] pp.

Institutional history of the Alcorn County congregations.


"Courthouses of Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 19 (Sept. 1981): 5.

Two structures formerly on the site of the present courthouse in Macon.


Coussons, John Stanford. "The Federal Occupation of Natchez, Mississippi, 1863-65."

M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1958. iv, 122 l.

Effects of occupation on the economy and social life of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Cox, Elizabeth A. "The Secession Controversy: Opinions of the Mississippi Press." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1972. ii, 57 l.

Examines positions of five newspapers, 1859-61.


Cox, Isaac Joslin. The West Florida Controversy, 1798-1813. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1918. xii, 699 pp.

Diplomatic history of the conflicting international claims to West Florida, which included the southernmost portion of present-day Mississippi.


Cox, William E. "The Greens of Jefferson County, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 1 (Feb. 1974): 77-103.

History, 1770s-1813, of the family of Thomas Marston Green, planter and territorial delegate to Congress from Natchez (Adams Co.).


Cozzens, Peter. The Darkest Days of the War: The Battles of Iuka and Corinth. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997. Civil War America series. xvi, 390 pp.

Account of the crucial 1862 North Mississippi battles in present-day Alcorn and Tishomingo counties; excerpted in Civil War Times Illustrated (May 1997) as "Moving into Dead Men's Shoes: The Fight for Battery Robinett at the Battle of Corinth, Mississippi."


Craddock, Steven Culver. "'To the Honor and Credit of the Country': A History of the Warships Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 2 (May 1992): 129-48.

Five warships that have borne the name "Mississippi," 1841-1991.


Craig, Lucie H. "The Removal of the Choctaw Indians." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1929. 109 [ii] l.

Government relations with Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians before their removal to Oklahoma in the 1830s.


Crane, Verner W. The Southern Frontier, 1670-1732. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1929. vi, 359 pp.

Deals in part with the conflict over control of the Lower Mississippi River Valley.


Cranford, Sammy Orren. "The Fernwood, Columbia and Gulf: A Railroad in the Piney Woods of South Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1983. 388 l.

Business history of the short line railroad that served Pike, Walthall, and Marion counties and of the Enochs family who controlled it, 1880s-1972.


Cranford, Sammy. "Scenes of the Overflows of 1912 and 1913 in Bolivar County." Journal of the Bolivar County Historical Society 4 (Mar. 1980): 9-17.

Pictorial article depicts Mississippi River flooding.


Craven, Avery. "The 'Turner Theories' and the South." Journal of Southern History 5, no. 3 (Aug. 1939): 291-314.

Argues that Frederick Jackson Turner's frontier thesis can also be applied to social, political, and cultural life on the southern frontier; includes mention of Seargent Prentiss, Robert J. Walker, Albert Gallatin Brown, and Jefferson Davis.




Crawford, Charles Wann. "Charles H. Brough: Educator and Politician." M.A. thesis, University of Arkansas, 1957. 132 l.

Life of Brough (1876-1935) of Clinton (Hinds Co.), scholar, teacher, lawyer, and later governor of Arkansas.


Crawford, Charles Wann. "A History of the R.F. Learned Lumber Company, 1865-1900." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1968. 325 l.

Business history of the company, successor to Andrew Brown and Company of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Crawford, Colin. Uproar at Dancing Rabbit Creek: Battling Over Race, Class, and the Environment. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1996. xxi, 410 pp.

Conflict, 1991-94, over planned location of a toxic waste dump in Noxubee County.


Crawford, Helen Mattox. "Aberdeen Is Created, 1836." Journal of Monroe County History 12 (1986): 4-14.

Emphasizes Tombigbee River steamboat traffic and the sale of town lots.


Crawford, Helen M. "Aberdeen Is Incorporated, May 12, 1837." Journal of Monroe County History 13 (1987): 21-24.

Founding and early municipal government.


Crawford, Helen Mattox. "The Athens Jail." Journal of Monroe County History 4 (1978): 2-10.

History of the county's oldest public building (1845).


Crawford, Helen Mattox. "Monroe County Courthouse-1857." Journal of Monroe County History 7 (1981): 32-40.

History of the Aberdeen structure.


Crawford, Vicki Lynn. "Grassroots Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement." SAGE 5, no. 2 (Fall 1988): 24-29.

Focuses on women activists in the 1960s: Winson Hudson of Leake County, Annie Devine of Madison County, and Unita Blackwell of Issaquena County.


Crawford, Vicki. "Race, Class, Gender, and Culture: Black Women's Activism in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement." Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 1 (Spry. 1996): 1-21.

Argues that African American women organized and mobilized the movement, particularly within local communities.


Crawford, Vicki Lynn. "'We Shall Not Be Moved': Black Female Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement, 1960-1965." Ph.D. dissertation, Emory University, 1987. 221 l.

Examines involvement by urban middle-class women, younger women and teens, and rural organizers, including Annie Devine and Winson Hudson.


Crawford, Vicki L., Jacqueline Anne Rouse, and Barbara Woods, eds. Women in the Civil Rights Movement: Trailblazers and Torchbearers, 1941-1965. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993. Blacks in the Diaspora series. xxi, 290 pp.

Includes "Men Led, but Women Organized: Movement Participation of Women in the Mississippi Delta," by Charles Payne; "Beyond the Human Self: Grassroots Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement," by Vicki Crawford; "Is This America? Fannie Lou Hamer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party," by Mamie E. Locke; and "Women as Culture Carriers in the Civil Rights Movement: Fannie Lou Hamer," by Bernice Johnson Reagon.


Craycroft, Robert, with the assistance of Lindsey Bute. The Neshoba County Fair: Place and Paradox in Mississippi. State College: Center for Small Town Research and Design, Mississippi State University, 1989. 136 pp.

History of the fair and analysis of residences and exhibition buildings.


Crespino, Joseph. "The Christian Conscience of Jim Crow: White Protestant Ministers and the Mississippi Citizens' Councils, 1954-1964." Mississippi Folklife 31, no. 1 (Fall 1998): 36-44.

Arguments of clergy-primarily Presbyterian and Baptist-in opposing the civil rights movement and the Brown decision.


Cresswell, Stephen. "Enforcing the Enforcement Acts: The Department of Justice in Northern Mississippi, 1870-1890." Journal of Southern History 53, no;. 3 (Aug. 1987): 421-40.

Examines the reasons for the extremely high conviction rate in Enforcement Acts cases (Ku Klux Klan violence, ballot stuffing) in federal court in Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Cresswell, Stephen. "Grassroots Radicalism in the Magnolia State: Mississippi's Socialist Movement at the Local Level, 1910-1919." Labor History 33, no. 1 (Winter 1992): 81-101.

Examines occupations of leaders, tax records, elections, and socialist newspapers, especially in the fifth and sixth congressional districts (East Central and Southeast Mississippi).


Cresswell, Stephen. Mormons and Cowboys, Moonshiners and Klansmen: Federal Law Enforcement in the South and West, 1870-1893. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1991. viii, 323 pp.

Chapter two, "Enforcing the Enforcement Acts in Northern Mississippi," attributes continuing anti-black violence and voter intimidation to weak sentences handed down by Judge Robert Andrews Hill (b. 1811); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Resistance and Enforcement: The U.S. Department of Justice, 1870-1893," University of Virginia, 1986.


Cresswell, Stephen. Multiparty Politics in Mississippi, 1877-1902. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1995. xi, 285 pp.

Assesses strength of opposition parties (Republican, Greenback, Independent, Prohibition, People's, Socialist, Democratic-Republican fusion) in the years following Reconstruction and attributes their demise to disfranchisement of African Americans and cooptation of the Populist platform by the Democratic Party in 1896.


Cresswell, Stephen. "Red Mississippi: The State's Socialist Party, 1904-1920." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 3 (Aug. 1988): 153-71.

Maintains that the Socialists represented the greatest challenge to Democratic monopoly in the period and derived their strongest support from the southeastern counties of Jones, Forrest, and Harrison.


Crigler, T.W., Jr. "American Legion Post #63." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 39 (Sept. 1986): 2.

Organization of the post, 1921.


Crigler, T.W., Jr. "Israel Victor Welsh." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 3 (Sept. 1977): 6-7.

Brief sketch of the Confederate congressman (1822-1873?) from Macon.


Crigler, T.W., Jr. "Some Brief Facts About Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 2 (June 1977): 8.

Includes fifteen items.


Crigler, Tom White, Jr. "The 'Sawdust Trail' in Noxubee County: The 'Gipsy' Smith Evangelistic and Revival Meeting." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 17 (Mar. 1981): 2-4.

Organization of a large Smith (d. 1930s) revival in Macon, 1923.


Crigler, Tom White, Jr. "Tornado in Macon." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 4 (Dec. 1977): 2.

Brief account of the April 25, 1880, tornado that destroyed much of the town.


Criss, Gail, and Charlotte Hill. "A Demographic Study of Bolivar County in 1850." Journal of the Bolivar County Historical Society 1 (Mar. 1977): 3-9.

Entirely based on census data.


Crist, Lynda Lasswell. "A Bibliographical Note: Jefferson Davis's Personal Library: All Lost, Some Found." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 3 (Aug. 1983): 186-93.

Attempts to trace Davis's personal papers, some of which have been preserved by family members, but many of which have never been located.


Crist, Lynda Lasswell. "A 'Duty Man': Jefferson Davis as Senator." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 4 (Nov. 1989): 281-95.

Portrays Davis as an antebellum U.S. senator, including information on his pet projects, his committee assignments, his speeches, his rejection of official perquisites, and his poor relationship with fellow senator Henry S. Foote.


Crist, Lynda Lasswell. "'Useful in His Day and Generation': James Alexander Ventress (1805-1867)." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Tennessee, 1979. 371 l.

Biography of the Wilkinson County planter and politician, called "father of the University" of Mississippi.


Crocker, Les. "An Early Iron Foundry in Northern Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 2 (May 1973): 113-26.

Holly Springs Ironworks (Marshall Co.) produced architectural ornamental ironwork, 1839-62.


Crocker, Leslie Frank. "The Greek Revival Architecture of Holly Springs, Mississippi, 1837-1867." M.A. thesis, University of Missouri, 1967. 138 l.

Early history of the Marshall County seat and analysis of the design and construction of sixteen classical revival and eclectic houses; includes illustrations.


Crocker, Mary Wallace. Historic Architecture in Mississippi. Jackson: University and College Press of Mississippi, 1973. xiii, 194 pp.

Photographs and histories of 173 representative historic houses and other structures.


Crockett, Norman L. The Black Towns. Lawrence: Regents Press of Kansas, 1979. xv, 244 pp.

Includes discussion of Mound Bayou (Bolivar Co.), established in 1887.


Cromwell, John W. The Negro in American History. Washington: American Negro Academy, 1914. xiii, 284 pp.

Includes chapter on U.S. Senator Blanche Kelso Bruce (1841-98).


Crosby, Emilye. "'Coming Back at You': Challenging White Supremacy in Port Gibson, Mississippi." Mississippi Folklife 31, no. 1 (Fall 1998): 21-27.

Civil rights strategies in the Claiborne County town, 1966.


Cross, Ralph D. "The Tropical Cyclone and Mississippi Hurricanes." Southern Quarterly 11, no. 3 (Apr. 1973): 241-56.

Traces paths of hurricane and tropical storms that have crossed Mississippi since the 1930s; mentions Hurricane Camille (1969).


Crouch, Evelyn Bell, ed. History of Montgomery County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1993. vi, 612 pp.

Towns, wars, architecture, public buildings, churches, cemeteries, schools, organizations, business, and industry; bulk of the volume comprised of family histories.


Crouse, Nellis Maynard. Lemoyne d'Iberville, Soldier of New France. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1954. ix, 280 pp.

Biography of Pierre Lemoyne d'Iberville (1666-1706).


Crowson, E.T. "George Frederick Holmes and Auguste Comte." Mississippi Quarterly 22, no. 1 (Winter 1968-69): 59-70.

Relationship between Holmes (1820-97), noted anti-positivist and first president of the University of Mississippi, and Comte, author of the positivist tract Cours de Philosophie Positive; Holmes introduced Americans to Comte's work through an influential series of articles.


Crowson, E.T. "The Life and Thought of George Frederick Holmes." M.A. thesis, American University, 1952. 144 l.

Intellectual biography of the first president of the University of Mississippi.


Crowther, Edward R. "Mississippi Baptists, Slavery, and Secession, 1806-1861." Journal of Mississippi History 61, no. 2 (May 1994): 129-48.

Evolving attitudes of the Mississippi Baptist Association toward slavery.


Crutchfield, James A. The Natchez Trace: A Pictorial History. Nashville, Tenn.: Rutledge Hill, 1985. 160 pp.

Heavily illustrated popular history of the road and the building of the Natchez Trace Parkway from Natchez (Adams Co.) to Nashville, Tennessee.


Culp, Ruby Lee. "The Missions of the American Board and Presbyterian Church Among the Five Civilized Tribes, 1803-1860." M.A. thesis, George Washington University, 1934. 152 l.

Chapter three, "The Choctaw and Chickasaw Missions East of the Mississippi River," describes the establishment and work of the Eliot, Mayhew, Monroe, Tockshish, Martyn, Emmaus, Mooshoolatubee, Yok-e-na Chu-ka-mah, and French Camp Missions, 1818-34.


Cummings, Richard. The Pied Piper: Allard K. Lowenstein and the Liberal Dream. N.Y.: Grove, 1985. xvii, 569 pp.

Biography of the liberal activist and New York congressman includes section five, "Good-Winging It in Mississippi," on his work in support of African American voting rights, 1963-65.


Cummins, Light Townsend. "An Enduring Community: Anglo-American Settlers at Colonial Natchez and in the Felicianas, 1774-1810." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 2 (May 1993): 133-54.

Traces the families of early settlers whose names were listed as grantees on the William Wilton map of 1774.


Cunnigen, Donald. "Men and Women of Goodwill: Mississippi's White Liberals." Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard University, 1988. 761 l.

Develops a collective profile of white liberals based on interviews with 108 subjects in Mississippi and North Carolina.


Cunnigen, Donald. "The Mississippi State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights, 1960-65." Journal of Mississippi History 53, no. 1 (Feb. 1991): 1-17.

Organization, membership, subcommittees, findings, and recommendations of the committee.


Cunningham, Mary Carmack. "The Development and Appreciation of Historic Architecture at Natchez, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, George Peabody College for Teachers, 1937. 125 l.

History and description of thirty-nine antebellum structures in Natchez (Adams Co.); includes photographs and several measured drawings.


Curlee, Elizabeth M. "The Phenix: Hernando, Mississippi, 1841-1846." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1970. iii, 187 l.

Based on extant copies of the De Soto County newspaper.


Curlee, Elizabeth Michael. "S.A. Jonas: A Preeminent Mississippi Editor." Journal of Monroe County History 10 (1984): 27-36.

Life of Sidney Alroy Jones (1825-1916), editor of the Aberdeen Examiner.


Current, Richard Nelson. Those Terrible Carpetbaggers: A Reinterpretation. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1988. xii, 475 pp.

Revisionist view of the careers of ten Northerners who held political office in the South during Reconstruction, including Albert T. Morgan (1842-1922), Republican Party leader and sheriff of Yazoo County, and Adelbert Ames (1835-1933), governor of Mississippi and later U.S. senator from Maine.


Current, Richard N. Three Carpetbag Governors. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1967. xii, 108 pp.

Fleming Lectures at Louisiana State University include "The Carpetbaggers As a Man of Conscience: Adelbert Ames," which argues that in the case of Ames, who was Reconstruction governor of Mississippi, "carpetbagger myth has prevailed over the historical fact."


Currie, James T. "The Beginnings of Congressional Reconstruction in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 3 (Aug. 1973): 267-86.

Defends Major General E.O.C. Ord, best known for his involvement in the circumstance that led to the Ex Parte McCardle case before the U.S. Supreme Court; article includes analysis of the political makeup of the constitutional convention of 1868, for which Ord was responsible.


Currie, James Tyson. "Conflict and Consensus: Creating the 1868 Mississippi Constitution." M.A. thesis, University of Virginia, 1969. 112 l.

Revisionist account of the making of the Reconstruction constitution finds that many of its progressive elements were retained in the 1890 constitution.


Currie, James T. Enclave: Vicksburg and Her Plantations. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1980. xxvii, 237 pp.

Vicksburg and Warren County during Union occupation and Reconstruction; examines the accommodation of plantation agriculture to the absence of slaves and the reaction of ex-slaves to their new status, including the experiment at Davis Bend, where freedmen ran their own plantation; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Vicksburg, 1863-1870: The Promise and the Reality of Reconstruction on the Mississippi," University of Virginia, 1975.


Currie, James T. "From Slavery to Freedom in Mississippi's Legal System." Journal of Negro History 65, no. 2 (Spry. 1980): 112-25.

Legal status of African Americans in nineteenth-century Mississippi; includes discussion of the Slave Code (1857), the Black Codes, and the Constitution of 1890, and provides statistics on crimes, court rulings, slaves executed and reimbursement to owners, and value of slaves.


Curry, Constance. Silver Rights. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin, 1995. xxvii, 258 pp.

Involvement in the civil rights movement of sharecroppers Mae Bertha (b. 1923) and Matthew (d. 1988) Carter, the first African American parents in Sunflower County to send their children to integrated public schools; book won the Lillian Smith Award.


Curtis, Christopher K. "Mississippi's Anti-Evolution Law of 1926." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 1 (Feb. 1986): 15-29.

Debate over the bill to prohibit the teaching of evolution in public schools; based on the author's master's thesis, "Mississippi Baptists Versus Evolution, 1919-1926." Mississippi College, 1983, which also reviews the Southern Baptist response to evolutionism in the years before 1926.


Curtis, Scott. "Penitentiary Reform in Mississippi, 1875-1906: A Study in Politics and Penal Affairs." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1974. v, 119 l.

Connection between agrarianism and penal reform in the state; examines particularly the convict lease system and the role of Governor James K. Vardaman and the 1890 constitution in the system's abolition.


Cushman, H.B. History of the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Natchez Indians. Greenville, Tex.: Headlight Printing, 1899. 503 pp.

Early history written by the son of missionaries to the Choctaw in Mississippi includes a glossary of North American Indian names; reprint by Redlands in 1962 was edited by noted authority Angie Debo.


Dalehite, William Moore, comp. A History of the Public Schools in Jackson, Mississippi, 1832-1972. Jackson: Board of Trustees, Jackson Public Schools, 1974. ix, 316 pp.

History of white and black schools; includes biographical sketches of persons memorialized in the names of district school buildings.


Dallas, Jerry W. "The Delta and Providence Farms: A Mississippi Experiment in Cooperative Farming and Racial Cooperation, 1936-1956." Mississippi Quarterly 40, no. 3 (Summer 1987): 283-308.

Founding, operations, and demise of two interracial cooperative farming projects: Delta Farm (Bolivar Co.) and Providence Cooperative Farm (Holmes Co.); discusses involvement of theologian Reinhold Niebuhr with Delta Farm, the White Citizens' Council's harassment of Providence, and the legacy of the projects.


Dana, Donald M., Jr. "Mississippi Power Company during World War II." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 4 (Nov. 1994): 325-39.

Effects of the war on the company, including material shortages and increased demand due to housing expansion around military bases and shipyards.


Daniel, Helen Thurstensen. "The History of the American Association of University Women in Mississippi." M.Ed. thesis, Mississippi College, 1954. vi, 166 l.

Organization of the American Association of University Women and the Southern Association of College Women in 1906 and activities of the AAUW, 1927-64.


Daniel, Pete. "The Crossroads of Change: Cotton, Tobacco, and Rice Cultures in the Twentieth Century South." Journal of Southern History 5, no. 3 (Aug. 1984): 429-56.

Includes mention of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta and the boll weevil, the 1927 Mississippi River flood, and the Delta and Pine Land Company scandal involving AAA finance director Oscar Johnston.


Daniel, Pete. Deep'n as It Come: The 1927 Mississippi River Flood. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1977. 162 pp.

Examines causes and effects of the flood throughout the region, including Mississippi; relief efforts and technological responses to prevent future devastation discussed.


Daniel, Pete. The Shadow of Slavery: Peonage in the South, 1901-1969. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1972. xii, 209 pp.

Chapter eight, "Two Old Men," concerns the 1927 Mississippi River flood relief effort that both revealed and exacerbated the problem of debt peonage among African American sharecroppers in the Mississippi Delta.


Daniels, Jonathan. The Devil's Backbone: The Story of the Natchez Trace. N.Y.: McGraw-Hill, 1962. 278 pp.

Popular history of the trace.


Dansby, B. Baldwin. A Brief History of Jackson College: A Typical Story of the Survival of Education Among Negroes in the South. Jackson, Miss.: Jackson College, 1953. xix, 286 pp.

Institutional history of the college (now Jackson State University) in Jackson (Hinds Co.) from its founding in 1877 as Natchez Seminary.


Darkis, Fred, Jr. "Alexander Keith McClung (1811-1855)." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 4 (Nov. 1978): 289-96.

Life of the unsuccessful Whig congressional candidate in 1847.


David Reese Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, comp. Some Early History of Lafayette County, Mississippi. N.p., 1922-. [49 l.]

Includes essays on communities, wills, artisans and merchants, homes, families, schools and teachers, the University of Mississippi, historic sites, churches, and cemeteries.


Davidson, Chandler, and Bernard Grofman, eds. Quiet Revolution in the South: The Impact of the Voting Rights Act, 1965-1990. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1994. xii, 503 pp.

Chapter five, "Mississippi," by Frank R. Parker, David C. Colby, and Minion K.C. Morrison assesses the impact of the 1965 Voting Rights Act on city aldermanic elections.


Davidson, Elizabeth H. Child Labor Legislation in the Southern Textile States. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1939. 302 pp.

Includes brief recounting of child labor reform efforts in Mississippi in the early twentieth century.


Davidson, George E. "Vicksburg, May 22, 1863." Army 19, no. 6 (June 1969): 56-60.

The "most decorated action of the most decorated campaign of the most decorated war," in which 156 members of a storming party were repulsed by Confederate forces.


Davies, David R. "J. Oliver Emmerich and the McComb Enterprise-Journal: Slow Change in McComb, 1964." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 1 (Feb. 1995):1-23.

Describes the role of the moderate editor (b. 1897) and his newspaper in managing the racial turmoil and violence in McComb (Pike Co.).


Davis, Allison; Burleigh B. Gardner, and Mary R. Gardner. Deep South: A Social Anthropological Study of Caste and Class. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1941. xv, 558 pp.

Elaborate analysis of social class and race relations in Natchez (Adams Co.), based on research conducted by an interracial team of social anthropologists in the 1930s.


Davis, Charles S. Colin J. McRae: Confederate Financial Agent. Tuscaloosa, Ala.: Confederate, 1961. No. 17 of Confederate Centennial Studies. 101 pp.

Brief biography of McRae (1813-77) of Alabama and Jackson County, Mississippi, who served in Congress and as the chief financial agent for the Confederacy in Europe, and was the brother of Mississippi governor John McRae.


Davis, Davis Ragland, ed. Edmondson Presbyterian Church, 1844-1930, De Soto County, Mississippi. N.p.: the editor, 1994. v. 145 pp.

Sesquicentennial history of the church, now called Whitehaven Presbyterian.


Davis, Dave D., ed. Perspectives on Gulf Coast Prehistory. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1984. xi, 379 pp.

Includes "The Mississippi Gulf Coast," by Dale Greenwell, and "Documentary Evidence for the Location of Historic Indian Villages in the Mississippi Delta," by Marco J. Giardino.


Davis, Edwin Adams, and William Ransom Hogan. The Barber of Natchez. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1954. 272 pp.

Biography of William Johnson (d. 1851), a free black barber and planter of Natchez (Adams Co.); based largely on interpretation of his extensive diaries, 1835-51, in which he recorded business dealings as well as observations about town life.


Davis, Edward. "Mississippi Choctaws." Chronicles of Oklahoma 10, no. 2 (June 1932): 257-66.

Federal treaties and laws before 1931 affecting the Mississippi Choctaws, including the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek; briefly describes efforts of senators John Sharp Williams, Byron "Pat" Harrison, and James K. Vardaman to secure federal aid for the tribe.


Davis, Edwin Adams. "William Johnson: Free Negro Citizen of Ante-Bellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 2 (Apr. 1953): 57-72.

Based on the diary, 1835-51, of Johnson, a barber of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Davis, Francis. The History of the Blues. N.Y.: Hyperion, 1995. viii, 309 pp.

Includes biographical information on many Mississippi blues artists.


Davis, Jack Emerson. "Deep South Reencountered: The Cultural Basis of Race Relations in Natchez, Mississippi, Since 1930." Ph.D. dissertation, Brandeis University, 1994. 494 l.

Continues the sociological analysis of Natchez (Adams Co.) begun by Allison Davis and Burleigh and Mary Gardner in Deep South (1941).


Davis, James Wilbur. "The Development of the CPA Profession in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1972. 312 l.

Accounting profession in Mississippi, 1904-71, including state laws and court cases, professional organizations, education, and leaders.


Davis, Kathleen Bailey. "Jefferson Davis and the Mississippi Gubernatorial Contest of 1851 with Selected Letters and Speeches Concerning the Campaign." M.A. thesis, Rice University, 1971. 250 l.

Recounts Davis's unsuccessful race against Unionist Henry S. Foote and illustrates the diversity of opinion within the state on the Compromise of 1850.


Davis, L.M. North Pearl River County. N.p., 1975. 60 pp.

Collection of brief vignettes, biographical sketches, recipes, and reprinted newspaper articles, 1847-1905.


Davis, Polly Ann. "Public Policy Toward Levee Construction in Mississippi Along the Mississippi River." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1954. 120 l.

Public and private levee building, 1717-1954; creation of levee districts; actions of the Liquidating Levee Board; and the creation of a multi-faceted flood-control program following the devastating 1927 flood.


Davis, R. Bruce. "The Tornado of 1840 Hits Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 1 (Feb. 1974): 43-51.

The most destructive tornado recorded in Mississippi up to that time struck the Natchez (Adams Co.) area on May 7, destroying much of the city and killing over three hundred persons.


Davis, Ronald L.F. Good and Faithful Labor: From Slavery to Sharecropping in the Natchez District, 1860-1890. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1982. xv, 225 pp.

Examines the origins of sharecropping in Adams County, Mississippi, and Concordia Parish, Louisiana; argues that sharecropping was initiated in part by freedmen themselves and that the institution served to organize the society and economy of the region.


Davis, Ronald L.F. "The U.S. Army and the Origins of Sharecropping in the Natchez District-A Case Study." Journal of Negro History 62, no. 1 (Jan. 1977): 60-80.

Traces the role of Union officers, especially Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas, in the transition of black workers from slavery to sharecroppering in the Lower Mississippi Valley, including Adams County.


Davis, Stephen. "Empty Eyes, Marble Hand: The Confederate Monument and the South." Journal of Popular Culture 16, no. 3 (Winter 1982): 2-21.

Examines the Confederate monument movement in the South; mentions monuments in Oxford (Lafayette Co.), West Point (Clay Co.), and Raymond (Hinds Co.).


Davis, W. Milan. Pushing Forward: A History of Alcorn A&M College and Portraits of Its Successful Graduates. Okolona, Miss.: Okolona Industrial School, 1938. x, 124 pp.

History of the Claiborne/Jefferson County school, which was founded in 1871 as the nation's first African American land grant college; includes brief biographies of nine alumni.


Davis, William Graham. "Attacking 'The Matchless Evil': Temperance and Prohibition in Mississippi, 1817-1908." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1975. 278 l.

Looks at temperance organizations, violence, the role of Methodist Bishop Charles B. Galloway, and the enactment of state prohibition.


Davis, William C., ed. Fighting for Time. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1983. Vol. 4 of The Image of War. 464 pp.

Includes heavily illustrated essay by Herman Hattaway on the Vicksburg Campaign of 1862-63, "Jewels of the Mississippi: Vicksburg and Port Hudson."


Davis, William C. Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour. N.Y.: HarperCollins, 1991. xv, 784 pp.

Sympathetic portrayal of Davis's complex character.


Dawson, Cole Patrick. "Southern Whiggery in Portraiture: George Poindexter and Benjamin Watkins Leigh." M.A. thesis, Miami University, 1973. 139 l.

Examines two influential Whigs, including Poindexter (1779-1853) of Natchez (Adams Co.) in search of the origins of the party.


Dawson, Jim. A Sketch of Sam Dale, Jr. Meridian, Miss.: Lauderdale County Department of Archives and History, 1993. 16 pp.

Information about General Dale (1772-1841) and his family taken from public records; Dale fought in the Creek War of 1813-14 and represented Lauderdale County in the Mississippi Legislature in the 1830s.


Day, Beth. The Little Professor of Piney Woods: The Story of Professor Laurence Jones. N.Y.: Julian Messner, 1955. 192 pp.

Anecdotal history of Laurence C. Jones's 1909 founding of the Piney Woods Country Life School (Rankin Co.) for African American youth.


Day, Jacqueline Nicole. "Blanche Butler Ames: A Study of Gender, Class, and Politics during the Civil War and Reconstruction Era." M.A. thesis, Washington State University, 1996. 127 l.

Civil War and Reconstruction experiences and family relationships of Ames (b. 1847), daughter of Union General Benjamin Butler and wife of U.S. senator and Mississippi governor Adelbert Ames.


Day, Richard M. "The Economics of Technological Change and the Demise of the Sharecropper." American Economic Review 57, no. 3 (June 1967): 427-449.

Economic analysis of the effect of technology on the sharecropping system, particularly in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, from 1940 to 1957.


Debo, Angie. The Rise and Fall of the Choctaw Republic. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1934. Vol. 6 of Civilization of the American Indian. xviii, 314 pp.

Chapter one is devoted to the Choctaws in Mississippi and Alabama; chapter two treats Choctaw-white relations prior to removal to Oklahoma in the 1830s.


DeCell, Harriet, and JoAnne Pritchard. Yazoo: Its Legends and Legacies. Yazoo City, Miss.: Yazoo Delta, 1976. 515 pp.

Extensive county history, including genealogies, focusing primarily on the period before 1876.


Dees, Eula. "The Educational History of Tippah County, Mississippi, from 1836 to 1936." M.S. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1942. 73 l.

Includes treatment of private and public schools and Blue Mountain College.


Delanglez, Jean. "The Natchez Massacre and Governor Perier." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 17, no. 4 (Oct. 1934): 631-41.

Criticizes the Louisiana governor's order to kill the Chaouocha tribe near New Orleans in retribution for the 1730 massacre of French settlers by the Natchez Indians.


Delta Staple Cotton Festival Association. One Hundred Years of Progress in the Mississippi Delta: Clarksdale, Coahoma County, 1836-1936. Clarksdale, Miss.: Clarksdale Printing, 1936. 74 pp.

Centennial celebration booklet includes brief histories of Clarksdale and Coahoma County and biographical sketches of prominent citizens.


Dennis, Frank Allen, ed. Southern Miscellany: Essays in Honor of Glover Moore. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1981. xiii, 202 pp.

Includes "Congressman William Barksdale of Mississippi," by James W. McKee, Jr., on Barksdale's role in secession; "Western Rebels, Eastern War: Troops in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865." By Fabian Val Husley, on three Mississippi units; and "Reflections on a Murder: The Emmett Till Case," by William M. Simpson, a chronology of the 1955 civil rights murder.


Dennis, Perry Brooks, Jr. "A History of the Mississippi Music Educators Association." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1973. viii, 242 l.

Institutional history, 1944-69.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. "Andrew Jackson and Negotiations for the Removal of the Choctaw Indians." Historian 29, no. 3 (May 1967): 343-62.

Negoiations, 1829-30, preceding the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, the first to call for forced removal of the Choctaw.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. "Carpenter's Estimate on the Building of 'The Forest.'" Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 3 (Aug. 1965): 259-64.

William Dunbar's mansion near Natchez (Adams Co.), built in 1782 and destroyed by fire in 1852.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. "The Choctaw Removal of 1831: A Civilian Effort." Journal of the West 6, no. 2 (Apr. 1967): 237-47.

Concentrates on work of removal agents, particularly chief agent George Gaines.


DeRosier, Arthur H. "Cyrus Kingsbury-Missionary to the Choctaws." Journal of Presbyterian History 50, no. 4 (Winter 1972): 267-87.

Presbyterian clergyman Kingsbury (1786-1870) founded the Eliot and Mayhew missions in North Mississippi, worked to improve the lives of the Choctaws through practical education, advised them in treaty negotiations, and unsuccessfully fought to prevent their removal to Indian Territory.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. "Natchez and the Formative Years of William Dunbar." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 1 (Feb. 1972): 29-47.

Describes Natchez in the territorial period and follows the life and career of Dunbar (1750-1810) from Scottish immigrant to Mississippi planter, scientist, inventor of the cotton bale, and explorer of the Louisiana Purchase.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. "Pioneers with Conflicting Ideals: Christianity and Slavery in the Choctaw Nation." Journal of Mississippi History 21, no. 3 (July 1959): 174-89.

Demonstrates that while the Choctaws were acculturated to the ways of white settlers by missionaries in the early decades of the nineteenth century, they rarely adopted the practice of Negro slaveholding.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. The Removal of the Choctaw Indians. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1970. xii, 208 pp.

Traces federal Indian policy from the presidency of Thomas Jefferson to the completion of Choctaw relocation to Oklahoma in 1834; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Removal of the Choctaw Indians from Mississippi," University of South Carolina, 1959.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. "William Dunbar, Explorer." Journal of Mississippi History 25, no. 3 (July 1963): 165-85.

Dunbar's role as leader of the second expedition to the Louisiana Purchase, 1804-1805.


DeRosier, Arthur H., Jr. "William Dunbar: A Product of the Eighteenth Century Scottish Renaissance." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 3 (Aug. 1966): 185-227.

Dunbar's family history and early life in Scotland.


Derr, Reid S. "Our Share of Tomorrow." Journal of Mississippi History 59, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 323-37.

Efforts of Governor Paul B. Johnson, Jr., to attract industry to the state, 1964-68; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Triumph of Progressivism: Governor Paul B. Johnson, Jr., and Mississippi in the 1960s," University of Southern Mississippi, 1994, which places Johnson in the populist-progressive tradition of governors James K. Vardaman, Theodore G. Bilbo, and Paul B. Johnson, Sr.


DeSantis, Vincent P. "The Republican Party and the Southern Negro, 1877-1897." Journal of Negro History 45, no. 2 (Apr. 1960): 71-87.

Describes the opportunities and frustrations faced by African Americans in the Republican party; includes mention of Mississippians John R. Lynch and Blanche K. Bruce.


Deupree, J.G. "Colonel R.A. Pinson." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (Centenary Series, 1918): 9-11.

Brief sketch of Richard Alexander Pinson (1829-73) of Pontotoc County, Confederate officer and state legislator; includes portrait.


Deupree, Mrs. N.D. "Some Historic Homes in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 325-47.

Description and some photographs of Beauvoir in Biloxi (Harrison Co.), Longwood in Natchez (Adams Co.), Blakely in Warren County, the George S. Yerger house in Jackson (Hinds Co.), the John Ford house in Marion County, The Hill in Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), and the Charles Bonner, A.M. West, James-Shuford, and William F. Mason houses in Holly Springs (Marshall Co.).


Deupree, N.D. "Greenwood Leflore." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 140-51.

Biographical sketch and portrait of Leflore (1800-65) of Malmaison (Carroll Co.), planter, last Choctaw chief in Mississippi before removal, and negotiator of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek in 1830.


Deupree, N.D. "Some Historic Homes of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 245-64. Description and some photographs of Lochinvar in Pontotoc County, Eagle's Nest in Coahoma County, Greenwood and Mount Salus in Hinds County, Porterfield in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Monmouth in Natchez (Adams Co.), Concord in Adams County, Kirkwood in Madison County, Wexford Lodge/Shirley house in the Vicksburg National Military Park (Warren Co.), Malmaison in Carroll County, the Jacob Thompson house in Oxford (Lafayette Co.), and Blue Mountain in Tippah County.


Deweese, Orval Henry. "The Mississippi Choctaws." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1957. 79 l.

Overview of Choctaw history.


Dibble, Ernest F., and Earnest W. Newton, eds. In Search of Gulf Coast Colonial History: Proceedings of the First Gulf Coast History and Humanities Conference. Pensacola, Fla.: Historic Pensacola Preservation Board, 1970. vi, 127 pp.

Includes "Resources and Research Opportunities for British West Florida, 1763-1781," by Robert Right Rea, and "Bibliographical Resources in the United States for Gulf Coast Studies," by Samuel Proctor.


Dibble, Ernest F., and Earle W. Newton, eds. Spain and Her Rivals on the Gulf Coast. Pensacola, Fla.: Historic Pensacola Preservation Board, 1971. vi, 143.

Proceedings of the second Gulf Coast History and Humanities Conference include "French, Spanish, and English Indian Policy on the Gulf Coast, 1513-1763: A Comparison," by John J. TePaske, and "Gulf Coast Architecture," by Samuel Wilson, Jr.


Dickey, Dallas C. "The Disputed Mississippi Election of 1837-1838." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 4 (Oct. 1939): 217-34.

Democratic congressmen J.F.H.Claiborne and Samuel J. Gholson, reelected for a special session of Congress scheduled for September 1837, claimed that the special elections superceded the regular November election, in which they were defeated by Whigs Seargent S. Prentiss and Thomas J. Word.


Dickey, Dallas C. "The Oratorical Career of Seargent S. Prentiss." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 2 (Apr. 1940): 63-70.

Career of Prentiss (1808-50), congressman and "leading orator" of Mississippi.


Dickey, Dallas C. Seargent S. Prentiss: Whig Orator of the Old South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1946. ix, 422 pp.

Biography of Whig congressman Prentiss (1808-50).


Dickson, Harris. An Old-Fashioned Senator: A Story-Biography of John Sharp Williams. N.Y.: Frederick A. Stokes, 1925. xiv, 205 pp.

Informal life of Williams (1854-1932), U.S. senator of Cedar Grove Plantation (Yazoo Co.).


Dillard, Anthony Winston. "The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek between the United States and the Choctaw Indians in 1830." Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society 3 (1899-99): 99-106.

Based on mid-century correspondence of Colonel George Strother Gaines.


DiMichele, Charles Conrad. "The History of the Eastern Orthodox Church in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1968. v, 85 l.

History of Greek Orthodox and Syrian Orthodox congregations from the late nineteenth century.


DiMichele, Charles Conrad. "The History of the Roman Catholic Educational System in Mississippi." Ed.D. dissertation, 1973, Mississippi State University, 1973. 217 l.

Catholic schools in the state, 1841-1973.


Dimick, Howard T. "The Capture of Jefferson Davis." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 4 (Oct. 1947): 238-54.

Evaluates conflicting evidence on Davis's garb when captured by federal troops on May 10, 1865.


Dimick, Howard T. "The Mythical Confederate 'Treasure.'" Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 4 (Oct. 1949): 243-49.

Recounts Union rumors that Jefferson Davis and his party carried a fortune in specie with them when they fled Richmond at the end of the war.


Dinges, Bruce J. "Grierson's Raid." Civil War Times Illustrated 34, no. 6 (Feb. 1996): 50-60, 62, 64.

Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson's Army of Tennessee cut through the length of Mississippi in April and May, 1863.


Dinges, Bruce Jacob. "The Making of a Cavalryman: Benjamin H. Grierson and the Civil War Along the Mississippi, 1861-1865." Ph.D. dissertation, Rice University, 1978. 574 l.

Includes material on Grierson's raid through Mississippi.


Dinnerstein, Leonard. "Southern Jewry and the Desegregation Crisis, 1954-1970." American Jewish Historical Quarterly 62 (1973): 231-41.

Includes information on Rabbi Perry Nussbaum, whose Jackson (Hinds Co.) home and office were bombed in 1967.


Dirck, Brian. "Communities of Sentiment: Jefferson Davis's Constitutionalism." Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 2 (Summer 1996): 135-62.

Examines Davis's interpretation of the U.S. Constitution..


Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994. 530 pp.

Details racial injustice and the involvement of individuals and organizations, especially the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), in the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s; winner of the Lillian Smith Award, the Bancroft Prize, and the McLemore Prize.


Dobbs, Sharron Lynn. "Jefferson College: A Study of the Origins of Higher Education in Mississippi, 1802-1848." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1987.

Case study of the founding and decline of the Washington (Adams Co.) school; includes a list of antebellum academies.


Dodd, William E. Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: G.W. Jacobs, 1907. 396 pp.

Early sympathetic biography.


Dodd, William Edward. Robert J. Walker, Imperialist. Chicago: Chicago Literary Club, 1914. 40 pp.

Praises Walker (1801-69) for his efforts in Europe to ruin Confederate credit.


Dodd, William E. Statesmen of the Old South, or From Radicalism to Conservative Revolt. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1911. ix, 242 pp.

Includes material on Jefferson Davis.


Dodson, Clyde N. "The Battle of Brice's Crossroads." Military Review 44, no. 6 (June 1964): 85-98.

Strategy, casualties, and effects of the 1864 battle near Baldwyn (Lee County).


Dodson, Leslie Weldon. "The Mississippi Sharecropper in Fact and Fiction." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1952. 102 l.

Compares the reality of sharecropper life to the version depicted in "sharecropper novels."


Dolensky, Suzanne T. "The Daughters of Jefferson Davis: A Study in Contrast." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 4 (Nov. 1989): 313-40.

Contrasts the two Davis daughters who survived to adulthood: Margaret Howell Davis Hayes (b. 1855) and Varina Anne ("Winnie") Davis (b. 1864), the "daughter of the Confederacy" who came to symbolize the "lost cause."


Dolensky, Suzanne T. "Varina Howell Davis, 1889 to 1906: The Years Alone." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 2 (May 1985): 90-109.

Eventful widowhood of the wife of Confederate president Jefferson Davis, including her husband's burial in Richmond, the writing of her memoir, her relocation to New York, the conversion of their home, Beauvoir, into a Davis memorial, and the death of her daughter Winnie.


Doler, Thurston Ermon. "Theodore G. Bilbo's Rhetoric of Racial Relations." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oregon, 1968. vi, 285 l.

Analysis of Bilbo's public speaking, including his exploitation of racist themes to advance his political career.


D'Olive, Annie Louise. "Folk Implements Used for Cleaning." Mississippi Folklore Register 2, no. 4 (Winter 1968): 125-34.

Describes handmade brushes, brooms, and mops used in South Mississippi until the early twentieth century.


Doll, Susan. Elvis: A Tribute to His Life. N.Y.: Beekman, 1989. 256 pp.

Heavily illustrated undocumented biography includes discography and filmography.


Dollard, John. Caste and Class in a Southern Town. New Haven, Conn.: Published for the Institute of Human Relations by Yale University Press, 1937. iv, 502 pp.

Socioeconomic analysis of the black and white populations of "Southerntown" (Indianola, Sunflower Co.); argues that a rigid caste system that originated with emancipation kept African Americans from entering the middle class.


Donald, David H. "The Scalawag in the Mississippi Reconstruction." Journal of Southern History 10, no. 4 (Nov. 1944): 447-60.

Argues that an honest and intelligent Reconstruction government fell to white Democrats who banded together to oppose Republican rule; plays down intimidation of black voters.


Dong, Zhengkai. "From Postbellum Plantation to Modern Agribusiness: A History of the Delta and Pine Land Company." Ph.D. dissertation, Purdue University, 1993. viii, 283 l.

History of the Bolivar County plantation, 1911-60s, including how it adjusted to economic, labor, and technological changes.


Dormon, James H., Jr. Theater in the Antebellum South, 1815-1861. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1967. xvi, 322 pp.



Includes material on theaters and plays presented in Natchez (Adams Co.) and Vicksburg (Warren Co.); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Theater in the Ante Bellum South," University of North Carolina, 1966.


Dorsey, Calvin. "The FCC Policy-Making System and the WLBT Case." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1976. vi, 92 l.

Chapter five, "A Historical Account of WLBT," reviews the 1955-69 case against the Jackson (Hinds Co.) television station for discriminating against African Americans and ignoring the fairness doctrine; the station lost its license in a 1969 appellate court ruling.


Dorsey, James Owen, and John R. Swanton. A Dictionary of the Biloxi and Ofo Languages, Accompanied with Thirty-One Biloxi Texts and Numerous Biloxi Phrases. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1912. Bulletin 47. c, 340 pp.

Includes Biloxi-English and Ofo-English dictionaries; by the early twentieth century very few members of the two small Indian tribes could be found in Mississippi and Louisiana.


Doss, Richard B. "Andrew Jackson, Road Builder." Journal of Mississippi History 16, no. 1 (Jan. 1954): 1-21.

Planning, construction, and use, 1815-24, of the Jackson Military Road, which ran from Florence, Alabama, to New Orleans.


Doster, James, and David C. Weaver. Tenn-Tom Country: The Upper Tombigbee Valley. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1987. ix, 238 pp.

Assesses the impact of the construction of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway on the upper Tombigbee River Valley, including part of Northeast Mississippi; based on examination of the geology, archaeology, history, economy, and architecture of the region.


Doughty, Lester Monroe. "A History of the Georgia Boundaries and the Yazoo Land Frauds." M.A. thesis, Oklahoma State University, 1932. vii, 51 l., [iii].

Chapter two, "The Yazoo Land Frauds," describes the conflicting claims to Mississippi, the sale of land to multiple speculators in 1795, and the U.S. Supreme Court decision (Fletcher v. Peck) that resolved the controversy in 1810.


Douglass, Eli. "The Federal Writers' Project in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 2 (Apr. 1939): 71-79.

History of the New Deal project and its publications, 1935-39.


Dowd, George L. "The Mississippi Baptist Association in the Mississippi Territory." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1949. v, 102 l.

Shows how the denomination grew in the period from 1798 to 1817.


Downs, Jackie. "Folklore of Tallahatchie County, Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 9, no. 1 (Spry. 1975): 45-50.

Late nineteenth- and twentieth-century history as told by local residents.


Downs, Michael S. "Advise and Consent: John Stennis and the Vietnam War, 1954-1973." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 2 (May 1993): 87-114.

Traces the U.S. senator's views from his initial reservations about American involvement to his reputation as the Senate's foremost war "hawk" as chairman of Senate Armed Services Committee from 1969 to 1973; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "A Matter of Conscience: John C. Stennis and the Vietnam War," Mississippi State University, 1989.


Doyle, Don H. "The Mississippi Frontier in Faulkner's Fiction and in Fact." Southern Quarterly 29, no. 4 (Summer 1991): 145-60.

Lafayette County bases for some of the themes in William Faulkner's fiction.


"Dr. John Clayton Fant." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 44 (Dec. 1987): 5-6.

Sketch of Fant (1870-1929), president of Mississippi State College for Women in Columbus (Lowndes Co.).


Drake, Claribel. "Mississippi's Elizabeth Academy: Its Claim to Be the Mother of Women's Colleges in America." Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine 96, no. 5 (May 1962): 487-88, 514.

History of the nominally-Methodist Adams County school, which was established in 1818 and named for its principal benefactor, Elizabeth Greenfield Roach.


Drake, Winbourne Magruder. "Constitutional Development in Mississippi, 1817-1865." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina, 1954.

Assesses constitutional conventions and traces evolution of laws regarding gubernatorial powers, the legislature, the judiciary, qualifications for office, suffrage, agriculture, industry, the slave trade, and constitutional amendment.


Drake, Winbourne Magruder. "The Framing of Mississippi's First Constitution." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 301-27.

Membership and agenda of the 1817 constitutional convention.


Drake, Winbourne Magruder. "Mississippi's First Constitutional Convention." Journal of Mississippi History 18, no. 2 (Apr. 1956): 79-110.

Includes information about delegates to the 1817 constitutional convention, the inspiration for the document, and its signing.


Drake, Winbourne Magruder. "The Mississippi Constitutional Convention of 1832." Journal of Southern History 23, no. 3 (Aug. 1957): 354-70.

Reasons for the new constitution and the changes that were made, most of which reflected population growth in the northern part of the state and an increasing push for popular participation in government.


Drake, Winbourne Magruder. "The Mississippi Reconstruction Convention of 1865." Journal of Mississippi History 21, no. 4 (Oct. 1959): 225-56.

Delegates to and actions of the Jackson convention.


Draper, Alan. Conflict of Interests: Organized Labor and the Civil Rights Movement in the South, 1954-1968. Ithaca, N.Y.: ILR Press, 1994. ix, 234 pp.

Includes chapter six, "Claude Ramsay, the Mississippi AFL-CIO, and the Civil Rights Movement;" Ramsay (1916-86) of Jackson County headed the Mississippi AFL-CIO, 1959-85.


Drinkard, Mildred E. Nero. Contributions of Blacks in Building Vicksburg, Mississippi, and Its Environmental Systems: 1820-1989. Vicksburg, Miss.: Mandala, 1989. 209 pp.

Includes information on African American residents, cemeteries, churches, businesses, homes, and historic sites.


Dubay, Robert W. John Jones Pettus, Mississippi Fire-Eater: His Life and Times. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1975. xii, 234 pp.

Blames Governor Pettus for poor leadership and inability to inspire legislative cooperation during the Civil War and the years immediately preceding it; based on the author's master's thesis, "John Jones Pettus: A Study in Secession," University of Southern Mississippi, 1966, and his Ph.D. dissertation, "John Jones Pettus, Mississippi Fire-Eater: His Life and Times, 1813-1867," University of Southern Mississippi, 1971.


Dubay, Robert W. "Mississippi and the Proposed Atlanta Constitution of 1860." Southern Quarterly 5, no. 3 (Apr. 1967): 347-62.

Attempt to establish solidarity among southern states, sparked by reaction to the John Brown raid of October 1859.


Dubay, Robert W. "Mississippi and the Proposed Federal Anti-Lynching Bill of 1937-1938." Southern Quarterly 7, no. 1 (Oct. 1968): 73-89.

Reviews congressional debate over three unsuccessful bills and recounts the Duck Hill lynchings, which turned the tide in favor of anti-lynching legislation in the House of Representatives.


Dubay, Robert W. "Mississippi Political, Civilian, and Military Realities of 1861: A Study in Frustration and Confusion." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 3 (Aug. 1974): 215-41.

Argues that Mississippi's war preparations were characterized by a misunderstanding of secession and the consequences of war, as well as a lack of unified direction and decisive action.


Dubay, Robert W. "Pigmentation and Pigskin: A Jones County Junior College Dilemma." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 1 (Feb. 1984): 43-50.

Controversy surrounding the college's invitation to play the Compton, California, team, which fielded eight African American players, in the Junior Rose Bowl of 1955.


DuBois, W.E. Burghardt. "Reconstruction and Its Benefits." American Historical Review 15, no. 4 (July 1910): 781-99.

Defense of Reconstruction legislation and policies by the premier African American intellectual of his day; article deals with Mississippi more than any other state.


Duclos, Donald Philip. "Son of Sorrow. The Life, Works and Influence of Colonel William C. Falkner, 1825-1889." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Michigan, 1962. 500l.

Includes biographical information on William Faulkner's great-grandfather.


Duffy, John. "Medical Practice in the Ante Bellum South." Journal of Southern History 25, no. 1 (Feb. 1959): 53-72.

Mentions three Mississippi physicians: homeopaths William H. Holcomb and F.A.W. Davis of Natchez (Adams Co.) and a Dr. Byrenheidt, who used hydropathic procedures.


Duke, Kevin. Why Brice's Crossroads? A Study of Tactical Victory and Strategic Defeat. Memphis, Tenn.: WordMagic, 1984. 40 pp.

Brief undocumented account of the 1864 battle near Baldwyn (Lee Co.).


Dulaney, W. Marvin, and Kathleen Underwood, eds. Essays on the American Civil Rights Movement. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1993. No. 26, Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures. xiii, 95 pp.

Includes "The Transformation of the Mississippi Movement, 1964-68: The Rise and Fall of the Freedom Democratic Party," by John Dittmer.


Duncan, Bingham. "A History of Carroll County from 1871." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1933. 61, xii l.

Centennial history stresses population growth and social and economic development.


Duncan, H.G., and Winnie Leach Duncan. "Development of Sociology in the Old South." American Journal of Sociology 39, no. 5 (Mar. 1934): 649-56.

Significance for the future discipline of sociology of two pro-slavery treatises, including Mississippian Henry Hughes's Treatise on Sociology (1854).


Duncan, H.G., and Winnie Leach Duncan. "Henry Huighes, Sociologist of the Old South." Sociology and Social Research 21, no. 3 (Jan./Feb. 1937): 244-58.

Life of Hughes (b. 1829) of Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), author of the pro-slavery volume, Treatise on Sociology (1854).


Duncan, Rosalie Quitman. "Life of General John A. Quitman." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 415-24.

Sketch of Quitman (1799-1858), controversial governor and congressman, written by his daughter.


Dundy, Elaine. Elvis and Gladys. N.Y.: St. Martin's, 1985. xvi, 350 pp.

Relationship between rock 'n' roll star Elvis Presley (1935-77) and his mother Gladys Love Presley (1912-58).


Dungan, James R. "'Sir' William Dunbar of Natchez: Planter, Explorer, and Scientist, 1792-1810." Journal of Mississippi History 23, no. 4 (Oct. 1961): 211-30.

Career of Dunbar of Adams County, including his innovations in cotton processing, his exploration of the Louisiana Purchase, his correspondence with Thomas Jefferson, and his scientific research.


Dunham, Melerson Guy. The Centennial History of Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College. Hattiesburg: University and College Press of Mississippi, 1971. xiv, 198 pp.

History of the first land grant college (Claiborne/Jefferson counties) for African Americans.


Dunn, Margaret Carter. "Criminals Along the Natchez Trace." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1970. 111 l.

Activities of Micajah and Wiley Harpe, Samuel Mason, Joseph Hare, and John A. Murrell before 1835.


Duren, William Larkin. Charles Betts Galloway: Orator, Preacher, and "Prince of Christian Chivalry." Atlanta: Banner, 1932. 331 pp.

Biography of Methodist Bishop Galloway (1849-1909) of Jackson (Hinds Co.), editor of the Christian Advocate.


Durrenberger, E. Paul. "The History of Shrimpers' Unions in Mississippi, 1915-1955." Labor's Heritage 5, no. 4 (Winter 1993-94): 66-76.

Organization of Biloxi (Harrison Co.)-area fishermen since 1915.


Duval, Mary V. "The Chevalier Bayard of Mississippi: Edward Cary Walthall." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 401-13.

Tribute to Walthall (1831-98) of Grenada (Grenada Co.), Confederate general and U.S. senator.


Duval, Mary V. History of Mississippi and Civil Government. Louisville, Ky.: Courier-Journal Job Printing, 1892. x, 387 pp.

School textbook includes text of the 1890 constitution.


Duval, Mary V. The Students' History of Mississippi from Its Earliest Discoveries and Settlements to the End of the Year 1886. Louisville, Ky.: Courier-Journal Job Printing, 1887. x, 236 pp.

School textbook.


Dye, David H., and Ronald C. Brister, eds. The Protohistoric Period in the Mid-South, 1500-1700. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1986. No. 18, Mississippi Department of Archives and History Archaeological Reports. xiv, 102 pp.

Includes "The Direct Historical Approach and Early Historical Documents: The Ethnohistorian's View," by Patricia K. Galloway, and "Protohistoric Settlement Patterns in Northeastern Mississippi," by Jay K. Johnson and John T. Sparks.


Dye, David H., and Cheryl Anne Cox, eds. Towns and Temples along the Mississippi. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1990. [xii], 292 pp.

Includes essay by Charles Hudson, Marvin T. Smith, and Chester B. DePratter, "The Hernando de Soto Expedition: From Mobile to the Mississippi River."


Dyer, Brainerd. "Robert J. Walker on Acquiring Greenland and Iceland." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 27, no. 2 (Sept. 1940): 263-66.

Walker's arguments for purchase of the Danish possessions, 1867.


Dyer, Stanford Phillips. "A Black View of Mississippi Reconstruction: The Political Careers of James Hill, Blanche Kelso Bruce, and John Roy Lynch." M.A. thesis, Louisiana Technological University, 1994. vi, 93 l.

Faults all three nineteenth-century leaders for hindering progress toward equality for African Americans.


Dykeman, Wilma. "The Southern Demagogue." Virginia Quarterly Review 33, no. 4 (Autumn 1957): 558-68.

Essay on the roots of southern demagoguery mentions James K. Vardaman and Theodore G. Bilbo.


Dykes, Mary Frances. "Mississippi Industrial Legislation, 1865-1880." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1953. 93 l.

Reasons for industrial development following the Civil War.


Eager, P.H. "Lafayette Rupert Hamberlin: Dramatic Reader and Poet." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 171-97.

Life and poetry of Hamberlin (1861-1902) of Clinton (Hinds Co.), professor of elocution and oratory at Vanderbilt University.


Eagles, Charles W., ed. The Civil Rights Movement in America. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1986. xii, 188 pp.

Includes essay by John Dittmer, "The Politics of the Mississippi Movement," which reviews the history of the civil rights movement in the state and emphasizes the conflict among three civil rights organizations: the NAACP, SNCC, and COFO, 1963-65.


Ealy, Charles R., Jr. "The Emmett Till Case: A Comparative Analysis of Newspaper Coverage." M.A. thesis, University of Texas at Dallas, 1996. vii, 166 l.

Examines local, state, and national reporting of the murder of the fourteen-year-old African American youth which took place in Tallahatchie County in July 1955.


"The Early Public Roads of Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 6 (June 1978): 1-3.

Covers road surveying, 1834-37.


Eason, Thomas R. "Economic Development in Mississippi: An Analysis of Historic Factors in Mississippi's Economic Development with Implications for Future Growth." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1968. 298 l.

Overview of agriculture, industry, banking, and labor throughout the state's history.


Eason, Thomas R. "Historical Institutional Change in the Mississippi Economy." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 4 (Nov. 1973): 345-59.

Historical overview examines attitudes toward economic development and reasons for the state's low ranking even among southern states.


East, Dennis. "New York and Mississippi Land Company and the Panic of 1837." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 4 (Nov. 1971): 299-331.

Fluctuating fortunes of a company formed to take advantage of the Mississippi land boom of 1835-37 that followed the opening of Indian lands; based on the author's master's thesis, "Land Speculation in the Chickasaw Cession: A Study of the New York and Mississippi Land Company, 1835-1889," University of Wisconsin, 1964.


Eatherly, Billy J. "The Occupational Progress of Mississippi Negroes, 1940-1960." Mississippi Quarterly 21, no. 1 (Winter 1967-68): 49-62.

Confirms that segregation limited African Americans to low income jobs.


Eaton, Clement. Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Free Press, 1977. xii, 334 pp.

Life (1808-89) and times of the president of the Confederate States of America.


Eckenrode, H.J. Jefferson Davis: President of the South. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1923. 371 pp.

Sympathetically portrays the failed leadership of the president of the Confederacy.


Edmondson, Ben G. "Pat Harrison and Mississippi in the Presidential Elections of 1924 and 1928." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 4 (Nov. 1971): 333-50.

Demonstrates that the urban-rural conflict of the 1920s did not affect Mississippians, who voted overwhelmingly in 1928 for Democratic presidential candidate Alfred E. Smith of New York; contends that U.S. senator Harrison helped in both campaigns to keep the race issue before the voters and thereby discourage voting for the Republican candidate.


Edmondson, Ben G. "Pat Harrison: The Gadfly of the Senate, 1918-1932." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1967. 119 l.

Portrays the relatively carefree pre-Depression years in the U.S. Senate of Harrison (1881-1941); characterizes him as the most popular senator of either party.


Edwards, Benjamin Griffiths. "The Life of William Grant Still." Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard University, 1987. 383 l.

Biography of the African American composer (1895-1978).


Edwards, Ishmell Hendrex. "History of Rust College, 1866-1967." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1993. 218 l.

History of the historically-black Holly Springs (Marshall Co.) school.


Edwards, Jesse Daniel. "Antebellum Holmes County, Mississippi: A History." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1992. x, 251 l.

Covers geography, settlement, Native Americans, economy, and culture.


Edwards, Thomas S. "'Reconstructing' Reconstruction: Changing Historical Paradigms in Mississippi History." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 3 (Aug. 1989): 165-80.

Historiographical essay places major historical writings on Mississippi Reconstruction in three schools: Dunningite, revisionist, and post-revisionist.


Egerton, John. A Mind to Stay Here: Profiles from the South. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1970. 190 pp.

Includes vignette of the life of civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-77) of Ruleville (Sunflower Co.).


Eggan, Fred. "Historical Changes in the Choctaw Kinship System." American Anthropologist 39 (new series), no. 1 (Jan./Mar. 1937): 34-54.

Outlines changes from the early historical period in Mississippi to the mid-nineteenth century in Oklahoma.


Eichert, Magdalen. "Some Implications Arising from Robert J.Walker's Participation in Land Ventures." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 1 (Jan. 1951): 41-46.

Walker's involvement in questionable land schemes in Mississippi and Texas led President Andrew Jackson in 1845 to warn newly elected President James K. Polk against appointing Walker secretary of the treasury.


Elias, Louis, Jr. "James Chappel Hardy: Founder of Gulf Park College for Women." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 3 (Aug. 1984): 213-26.

Role of Hardy (d. 1924) in the founding of the Gulfport (Harrison Co.) school, 1917-21; based on the author's Ed.D. dissertation, "A History of Gulf Park College for Women, 1917-1971," University of Mississippi, 1981.


Ellem, Warren A. "The Overthrow of Reconstruction in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 2 (May 1992): 175-201.

Examines the aims and premises of the much-imitated "Mississippi Plan" to end Reconstruction, 1875.


Ellem, Warren A. "Who Were the Mississippi Scalawags?" Journal of Southern History 38, no. 2 (May 1972): 217-40.

Uses analysis of 1869-75 black and white voting to pinpoint the area of greatest scalawag (native Republican) strength.


Ellingsworth, Huber. "The Thwarted Lecture Tour of Jefferson Davis." Quarterly Journal of Speech 43, no. 3 (Oct. 1957): 284-87.

Davis was forced to cancel northern speaking engagements in 1875 because of "ill-regards" from the northern press.


Elliott, Jack D., Jr. "City and Empire: The Spanish Origins of Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 59, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 271-321.

Early Natchez (Adams Co.) planning and construction, including maps, grants, and list of private buildings by block.


Elliott, Jack D., Jr. "The Fort of Natchez and the Colonial Origins of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 2 (Aug. 1990): 159-97.

Argues that the fort played a pivotal role in the establishment of Mississippi as a state.


Elliott, Jack D., Jr. "Leftwich's 'Cotton Gin Port and Gaines' Trace' Reconsidered." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 4 (Nov. 1980): 348-61.

Argues that George Leftwich's 1903 article in Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society contains inaccuracies about Bienville's fort and Gaines Trace that have been perpetuated by later historians.


Elliott, Jack D., Jr. "Natchez and the Primal Experience of the Nation." Southern Quarterly 29, no. 4 (Summer 1991): 8-16.

Argues that the Natchez area was one of the most important in American colonization.


Elliott, Jane Whiteside. "Lucy Somerville Howorth: Legislative Career, 1932-1935." M.A. thesis, Delta State University, 1975. 91 l.

Covers campaigns and legislative career of Howorth (b. 1895), daughter of legislator and suffragist Nellie Nugent Somerville.


Elliott, Mary Joan. "Winthrop Sargent and the Administration of the Mississippi Territory, 1798-1801." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern California, 1970. 243 l.

Portrait of the first governor of the Mississippi Territory.


Ellis, Irby Compton. "The Mississippi Union Bank and Repudiation." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1954. 120 l.

Bank failure in the Panic of 1837 led to repudiation of Union Bank and Planters' Bank bonds; refusal to honor the bonds was codified by constitutional amendment in 1875 and by constitutional provision in 1890.


Ellis, John H. Yellow Fever and Public Health in the New South. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992. xii, 233 pp.

Cover the epidemic of 1878 in New Orleans, Memphis, and Atlanta, but also includes mentions of affected Mississippi towns: Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Grenada (Grenada Co.), Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), Canton (Madison Co.), and Greenville (Washington Co.).


Ellsworth, Lucius F., ed. Ted Carageorge, William Coker, Earle W. Newton, assoc. eds. The Americanization of the Gulf Coast, 1803-1850. Pansacola, Fla.: Historic Pensacola Preservation Board, 1972. No. 3, Proceedings of the Gulf Coast History and Humanities Conference. 155 pp.

Essays on the economy, religion, society, race relations, politics, and archaeology of the Gulf Coast states, including Mississippi.


Emerson, O.B. "Bill's Friend Phil." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 2 (May 1970): 135-45.

Influence of Oxford (Lafayette Co.) lawyer Philip Stone on William Faulkner's early literary career, 1914-30.


Emerson, O.B. "William Faulkner's Nemesis-Major Frederick Sullens." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 2 (May 1974): 161-64.

Hypercritical editorials about Faulkner by the editor of the Jackson (Hinds Co.) Daily News, 1950.


Enck, Henry S. "Black Self-Help in the Progressive Era: The 'Northern Campaigns' of Smaller Black Industrial Schools, 1900-1915." Journal of Negro History 61, no. 1 (Jan. 1976): 73-87.

Includes mentions of "Tuskegee offshoots" in Mississippi: Utica Normal and Industrial Institute (Hinds Co.), Piney Woods County Life School (Rankin Co.), Industrial College in Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), and Okolona Industrial School (Chickasaw Co.), and describes efforts to attract northern benefactors.


The Episcopal Church in Mississippi, 1763-1992. Jackson: Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi, 1992. ix, 423 pp.

Narrative organized by tenure of bishops: William Mercer Green, Hugh Miller Thompson, Theodore DuBose Bratton, William Mercer Green II, Duncan M. Gray, Sr. and Jr., and John M. Allin.


Escott, Paul D. After Secession: Jefferson Davis and the Failure of Confederate Nationalism. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1978. 295 pp.

Problems faced by Davis in attempting to build a Confederate national spirit; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Jefferson Davis and the Failure of Confederate Nationalism," Duke University, 1974.


Escott, Paul D. "Jefferson Davis and Slavery in the Territories." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 1 (May 1977): 97-116.

Concludes that Davis did not oppose all of the Freeport Doctrine, that he did not advocate a slave code, and that he worked for a unified Democratic Party.


Eskridge, Michael. "Piney Woods Country Life School: A Case Study." Ed.D. dissertation, Seattle University, 1997. 135 l.

Includes history of the Rankin County boarding school for African American children, founded in 1909.


Estaville, Lawrence E., Jr. "A Strategic Railroad: The New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern in the Civil War." Louisiana History 14, no. 2 (Spry. 1973): 117-36.

Emphasizes the railroad's importance as a troop and supply carrier and the efforts of Union forces to either use it or cripple it.


Estes, Richard Taylor, Jr. "Sources of Democratic Party Strength in Mississippi Presidential Elections." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1974. 70 l.

Vote analysis from 1948 to 1972 identifies socio-economic characteristics of voters in four regions of the state and suggests reasons for declining Democratic voting.


Etheridge, Elizabeth W. The Butterfly Caste: A Social History of Pellagra in the South. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1972. ix, 278 pp.

Research by Dr. Joseph Goldberger of the U.S. Public Health Service, who established that pellagra was caused by a niacin deficiency; includes accounts of dietary experiments conducted at the Rankin Prison Farm (Rankin Co.) and the Methodist and Baptist orphanages in Jackson (Hinds Co.) in 1914; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Strange Hunger: A Social History of Pellagra in the South," University of Georgia, 1966.


Ethridge, Richard C. "The Fall of the Man: The United States Senate's Probe of Theodore G. Bilbo in December 1946, and Its Aftermath." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 3 (Aug. 1976): 241-62.

Examines the Senate investigation of Bilbo for African American voter intimidation and defense contract graft; final judgment on his seating was set aside due to Bilbo's last illness and death in 1947.


Ethridge, Richard Calvin. "Mississippi and the 1928 Presidential Campaign." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1961. 105 l.

Suggests reasons that Mississippians voted for "wet" Democrat Alfred E. Smith.


Ethridge, Richard Calvin. "Mississippi's Role in the Dixiecrat Movement." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1971. 319 l.

Argues that the Dixiecrat movement of 1948, organized largely by Mississippi governor Fielding Wright, laid the foundation for later large-scale voter realignment in the region.


Ethridge, William N., Jr. "An Introduction to Sargent's Code of the Mississippi Territory (1799-1800)." American Journal of Legal History 11, no. 1 (Jan. 1967): 148-51.

Establishment of the Mississippi Territory, 1798, and the naming of its first governor, Winthrop Sargent; Sargent's Code was the collective body of laws for government of the territory.


Eubank, Sever L. "The McCardle Case: A Challenge to Radical Reconstruction." Journal of Mississippi History 18, no. 2 (Apr. 1956): 111-27.

Ex Parte McCardle, the habeas corpus case involving Vicksburg Times (Warren Co.) editor William H. McCardle's arrest for criticizing military commander General E.O.C. Ord, went to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1869 but was dismissed; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, George Peabody College for Teachers, 1954.


Eubank, Sever Landon. "The Yerger Case: A Side Light of Reconstruction." M.A. thesis, Colorado College, 1950. v, 106 l.

Reviews the 1869 habeas corpus case of Edward M. Yerger for murdering Joseph G. Crane, the military mayor of Jackson (Hinds Co.); argues that if the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled on the case, the Reconstruction Act of 1867 could have been declared unconstitutional.


Eudy, John Carroll. "A Mississippi Log Wagon." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 2 (May 1968): 143-50.

History of the Lindsey Wagon Company, which made the first efficient transporter of large logs in the Piney Woods lumbering region at the turn of the twentieth century.


Eudy, John Carroll. "The Political Intrigues of Thomas Rodney: Territorial Politics, 1807-1809." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 4 (Nov. 1978): 329-39.

The activities of Rodney (1744-1811) as judge and land commissioner of the western district of the Mississippi Territory and his conflicts with territorial governor Robert Williams; based on the author's master's thesis, "Delaware Adventurer in the Mississippi Territory: Thomas Rodney, 1803-1811," University of Southern Mississippi, 1968.


Evans, Clement A., ed. Confederate Military History, Volume 7. Atlanta: Confederate, 1899. 278 pp.

Chapters by Charles E. Hooker cover secession, hostilities in Mississippi, action of Mississippi troops outside the state, and biographical sketches of Mississippi officers.


Evans, David. "Black Fife and Drum Music in Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 6, no. 3 (Fall 1972): 94-107.

Includes discussion of the eighteenth-century origin of fife and drum bands.


Evans, David. Tommy Johnson. N.p.: Studio Vista, 1971. 112 pp.

Life and music of blues musician Johnson (c. 1896-1956) of Hinds/Copiah counties; includes discography.


Evans, Dr. W.A., ed. "The Jefferson Davis Section: The Library at Beauvoir." Journal of Mississippi History 6, nos. 1-3 (Jan./Apr./July 1944): 51-54 (no. 1); 119-21 (no. 2); 174-76 (no. 3).

Annotates twenty-eight of over one thousand volumes in the library cottage at Davis's Biloxi (Harrison Co.) home.


Evans, Ronald V., ed. Threads of Tradition and Culture along the Gulf Coast. Pensacola, Fla.: Gulf Coast History and Humanities Confederence, 1986. xii, 241 pp.

Includes essays on Jefferson Davis and Lost Cause oratory, visual artist Walter Anderson, and art potter George Ohr.


Evans, W.A. "Diseases and Doctors in Monroe County, 1820-1935." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 3 (July 1943): 125-36.

Lists diseases, epidemics, and physicians.


Evans, W.A. "Free Negroes in Monroe County during Slavery." Journal of Mississippi History 3, no. 1 (Jan. 1941): 37-43.

Focuses on the methods by which a few slaves were emancipated.


Evans, W.A. "Gaines Trace in Monroe County, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no.2 (Apr. 1939): 100-109.

History of the Monroe County section of the road connecting the Tennessee and Tombigbee rivers, 1801-34.


Evans, W.A. A History of the First Baptist Church, Aberdeen, Mississippi, 1837 to 1945, Inclusive. Aberdeen, Miss.: First Baptist Church, 1945. 112 l., x.

Institutional history.


Evans, W.A. "Jefferson Davis Shrine-Beauvoir House." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 4 (Oct. 1940): 206-11.

History of Beauvoir in Biloxi (Harrison Co.), Davis's last home, 1878-89.


Evans, W.A. "Jefferson Davis, His Diseases and His Doctors, and a Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ewing Fox Howard." Mississippi Doctor 20 (June 1942): 14-26.

Davis's illnesses and injuries and the physicians who attended him.


Evans, W.A. "Mother Monroe: Boundaries Under Various Laws." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 4 (Oct. 1939): 235-40.

Formation of Monroe County and subsequent legislation carving other counties from it.


Evans, W.A. Mother Monroe: A Series of Historical Sketches of Monroe County. Hamilton, Miss.: Mother Monroe Publishing, 1979. x, 153 pp.

Collects previously published essays, vignettes, and gazetteer entries.


Evans, W.A. "The Route of De Soto Across Monroe County, December, 1540." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 2 (Apr. 1940): 71-78.

Reconstructs Hernando de Soto's route.


Evans, W.A. "Sarah Ann Ellis Dorsey, Donor of Beauvoir." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 2 (Apr. 1944): 89-102.

Life and family history of the woman whose will bequeathed Beauvoir (in Biloxi, Harrison Co.) to Jefferson Davis as a home for his retirement.


Evans, W.A. "Stagecoach Lines and Inns in Monroe County, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 3 (July 1942): 162-71.

Traces routes of three stage lines and the inns along them, 1830s-1850s.


Evans, W.A. "Steamboats on the Upper Tombigbee in the Early Days." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 4 (Oct. 1942): 216-24.

Steamboats on the river, 1821-1911.


Evans, W.A. "The Trial of Tishomingo." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 3 (July 1940): 147-55.

Trial and imprisonment for theft of Chickasaw chief Tishomingo, 1832.


Evans, William J. First Methodist Church, Columbus, Mississippi, 1860- 1960: A Brief History. N.p., n.d. 10 pp.

Centenniial history.


Everett, Frank E., Jr. Brierfield: Plantation Home of Jefferson Davis. Hattiesburg: University and College Press of Mississippi, 1971. x, 158 pp.

History of the house located on Davis's plantation at Davis Bend (Warren Co.).


Everett, Frank E., Jr. "Delayed Report of an Important Eyewitness to Gettysburg-Benjamin G. Humphreys." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 4 (Nov. 1984): 305-21.

Based on marginalia found in Humphreys's copy of Four Years with General Lee (1877); includes background on live of Humphreys (1808-82), governor of Mississippi, 1865-68.


Everett, George A., Jr. "The History of the German-American Community of Gluckstadt, Mississippi: A Study in Persistence." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 4 (Nov. 1976): 361-69.

Immigrant families from northern Germany who settled the Madison County community, at one time called Calhoun Station, in the late nineteenth century.


Ezell, John. "Jefferson Davis Seeks Political Vindication, 1851-1857." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 4 (Nov. 1964): 307-21.

Covers Davis's political career after Unionists defeated the states' righters in the secession convention of 1851.


Ezell, John. "Jefferson Davis and the Blair Bill." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 2 (May 1969): 121-26.

Reviews the first battle over federal aid to education, 1880-90, and reprints a letter in which Davis expressed his opposition to the bill, which would have guaranteed federal funds for African American public schools.


Ezell, John S. "Mississippi's Search for Oil." Journal of Southern History 18, no. 3 (Aug. 1952): 320-42.

Detailed account of oil prospecting in the state, 1903-45.


Fabel, Robin F.A. The Economy of British West Florida, 1763-1783. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1988. 296 pp.

Assesses the economic success of the colony, which included the area that is now South Mississippi.


Fabre, Michel. Translated from the French by Isabel Barzun. The Unfinished Quest of Richard Wright. N.Y.: William Morrow, 1973. xx, 652 pp.

Critical biography of the African American novelist (1908-60) from Adams County, who spent much of his career in self-imposed exile in Paris.


Fagerberg, Siegfried W. "A History of the Intercollegiate Athletic Program at the University of Southern Mississippi, 1949-1969." Ed.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1970. 480 l.

Includes development of the program, biographical sketches of staff members, season records, and athletic committees.


Fahey, John. Charley Patton. N.p.: Studio Vista, 1970. 111 pp.

Includes brief biography of the blues musician (late 1880s-1934), who was born in Bolton (Hinds Co.); includes discography.


Fairclough, Adam. "Historians and the Civil Rights Movement." Journal of American Studies 24, no. 3 (Dec. 1990): 387-98.

Historiographical essay on the movement mentions John Salter's account of the NAACP in Jackson (Hinds Co.), 1962-63; John Dittmer's Local People; and Stephen Whitfield's book in the Emmett Till murder, A Death in the Delta.


Fairley, Laura Nan, and James T. Dawson. Paths to the Past: An Overview History of Lauderdale County, Mississippi. Meridian, Miss.: Lauderdale County Department of Archives and History, 1988. 207 pp.

County history includes a chapter on famous citizens, a gazetteer of place names, and a list of elected officials, 1835-1930.


Faries, Clyde J. "Private Allen's Strategy of Reconciliation." Quarterly Journal of Speech 52, no. 4 (Dec. 1966): 358-63.

Examples of the mediation of Representative John Mills Allen (1846-1917) between his northern and southern colleagues.


Faries, Clyde J. "The Public Speaking of Private John Allen." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Missouri-Columbia, 1965. 428 l.

Argues that Congressman Allen (1846-1917) of Tupelo (Lee Co.), a humorous and effective orator, was an early progressive.


Faries, Clyde J. "Redneck Rhetoric and the Last of the Redeemers: The 1899 McLaurin-Allen Campaign." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 4 (Nov. 1971): 283-98.

Examines the 1899 U.S. Senate race between John Mills Allen and Governor Anselm J. McLaurin; argues that Allen underestimated the power of "redneck" rhetoric and that McLaurin's supporters stuffed ballot boxes.


Farnham, Christie Anne, ed. Women of the American South: A Multicultural Reader. N.Y.: New York University Press, 1998. x, 319 pp.

Includes "From Corn Mothers to Cotton Spinners: Continuity in Choctaw Women's Economic Life, A.D. 950-1830," by James Taylor Carson, and "A New Deal for Southern Women: Gender and Race in Women's Work Relief," by Martha H. Swain.


Farrar, Robert Harold. "The Gilmore Legacy." Journal of Monroe County History 6 (1980): 10-25.

Brothers Ellie Dawson Gilmore (d. 1927) and Thomas Jefferson Gilmore, early Amory settlers and businessmen.


Farris, Bobby N. "The Unification Issue in the Methodist Church and Reactions in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1964. 143 l.

Includes two chapters on Mississippi: "Merger Attempts and the Mississippi Methodists," and "The Division of the Mississippi Methodists over the Union Movement of 1939."


Faucette, Shirley. "Clinton-Yesterday." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 3 (Aug. 1978): 215-30.

Undocumented history of antebellum Clinton (Hinds Co.).


Faulkner, Leesha. "To Stem the Tide: The Mississippi Sovereignty Commission and Civil Rights." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1994. iv, 108 l.

Activities of the state spy agency created to combat the civil rights movement; thesis is based on approximately fifteen percent of the commission's files obtained by the author before they were opened by court order.


Fax, Elton C. Contemporary Black Leaders. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1970. x, 243 pp.

Includes biographical sketches of Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-77) of Ruleville (Sunflower Co.) and Charles Evers (b. 1922) of Fayette (Jefferson Co.).


Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration. Mississippi: A Guide to the Magnolia State. N.Y.: Viking, 1938. xxiv, 545 pp.

WPA guidebook includes background on the geography, history, culture, and economy of the state as well as tourist information.


Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration. Mississippi Gulf Coast, Yesterday and Today, 1699-1939. Gulfport, Miss.: Gulfport Printing Co. for the Woman's Club of Gulfport, 1939. American Guide series. viii, 162 pp.

Includes brief historical narrative and chronology.


Ferguson, Beth. Raymond: A History…1821-1876. N.p., n.d. 20 pp.

Brief history of the Hinds County town through Reconstruction.


Ferguson, James Sharbrough. "Agrarianism in Mississippi, 1871-1900." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina, 1952. ii, 639 l.

Detailed history of the causes, accomplishments, and demise of the agrarian movement; sees the Vardaman-Bilbo faction of the Democratic Party as a direct outgrowth of agrarianism.


Ferguson, James S. "Co-operative Activity of the Grange in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 1 (Jan. 1942): 3-19.

Focuses on the height of the state Grange's efforts to combat the crop lien system, 1871-75; based on the author's master's thesis, "The Granger Movement in Mississippi," Louisiana State University, 1940.


Ferguson, James S. "The Grange and Farmer Education in Mississippi." Journal of Southern History 8, no. 4 (Nov. 1942): 497-512.

Detailed the Grange's educational work in the state, 1871-98, including the founding of Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College (now Mississippi State University).


Ferguson, James Smith. "A History of Music in Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1820-1900." Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1970. vi, 192 l.

Covers church music, music teachers, dance and dance teachers, concerts, opera, bands, drama, circuses, minstrels, and merchandizing of music.


Ferrell, Chiles Clifton. "The Daughter of the Confederacy-Her Life, Character, and Writings." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 69-84.

Life of Varina Anne "Winnie" Jefferson-Davis (1864-98), youngest child of Jefferson Davis.


Ferrell, Guy Fulton. "A History of Political, Social, and Economic Conditions in Pontotoc County Mississippi to 1860." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1939. [v], 118 l.

Covers settlement, land acquisition, establishment of the town of Pontotoc, politics, schools, newspapers, and the economy.


[Ferris, Mike]. "Effect of the Civil War and 'Reconstruction' upon the Economy of Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 18 (June 1981): 4-7.

Reveals a fairly prosperous economy.


Ferris, William. Blues from the Delta. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor/Doubleday, 1978. xii, 226 pp.

Development of blues music in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta from the first successful performers of the 1920s to contemporary artists; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Black Folklore from the Mississippi Delta," University of Pennsylvania, 1969, which also examines prose narrative (folktales, dozens, toasts).


Ferris, William R., Jr. "Mississippi Folk Architecture: Two Examples." Mississippi Folklore Register 7, no. 4 (Winter 1973): 101-14.

Examines the Frank Foster home near Hickory Flat (Benton County) and the Willis Brown barn near Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.).


Ferryman, Andrew V. "Clinton and the Mississippi Legislature, 1826-1833: A City's Opportunity for Prominence." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1972. vi, 74 l.

Issues relevant to Clinton that came before the General Assembly, including establishment of Hinds County and selection of the sites for the state capital and state university.


Fessler, Loren W., ed. Chinese in America: Stereotyped Past, Changing Present. N.Y.: Vantage, 1983. xix, 305 pp.

Includes chapter on the Mississippi Chinese.


Fickle, James E. "Management Looks at the 'Labor Problem': The Southern Pine Industry during World War I and the Postwar Era." Journal of Southern History 40, no. 1 (Feb. 1974): 61-76.

Evaluates the industry's labor relations; finds that heavy African American outmigration and resistance to unionization were detrimental to the industry.


Fike, Claude E. "The Administration of Walker Leake (1822-1825)." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 2 (May 1970): 103-15.

Accomplishments of the Leake administration.


Fike, Claude E. "The Gubernatorial Administrations of Governor Gerald Chittocque Brandon, 1825-1832." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 3 (Aug. 1973): 237-65.

Brandon (1788-1850) was the first native-born governor of the state.


Findlay, James F., Jr. Church People in the Struggle: The National Council of Churches and the Black Freedom Movement, 1950-1970. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1993. ix, 255 pp.

See especially chapters three, "'Visitors in Hell': Church Involvement in the Movement in Mississippi;" four, "'Servanthood' in Mississippi: The Delta Ministry, 1964-1966;" and five, "Reconciliation and 'The Justice Place': The Delta Ministry, 1966-1974."


Findlay, James. "In Keeping with the Prophets: The Mississippi Summer of 1964." Christian Century 105, no. 18 (June 1988): 574-76.

Brief undocumented narrative based on recollections of some of the three hundred clergymen sent to Mississippi by the National Council of Churches to work in the civil rights movement.


Findlay, James F. "The Mainline Churches and Head Start in Mississippi: Religious Activism in the Sixties." Church History 64, no. 2 (June 1995): 237-50.

Support for the Child Development Group of Mississippi and the Delta Ministry by the National Council of Churches, the Presbyterian Church, and the United Church of Christ, 1965-68.


Finley, Katherine P., and Paul T. Nolan. "Mississippi Drama between Wars, 1870-1916: A Checklist and an Argument." Journal of Mississippi History 26, nos. 3 & 4 (Aug. 1964; Nov. 1964): 219-28 (part 1); 299-306 (part 2).

List of plays and playwrights; observes that the plays of the period are valuable historical artifacts.


Finnegan, Terence Robert. "'At the Hands of Parties Unknown': Lynching in Mississippi and South Carolina, 1881-1940." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois, 1993. 378 l.

Analysis of hundreds of lynchings finds that most victims were tenant farmers, most mobs included the victim's employer, and the size of the lynch mob varied according to the victim's "crime;" concludes that the civil rights movement grew out of African American reaction to lynching.


First Presbyterian Church, Highway 8 West, Cleveland, Mississippi: Golden Anniversary Year. Cleveland, Miss.: n.p., 1965. 20 pp.

Includes brief history of the church.


"First United Methodist Church of Macon." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 18 (June 1981): 2-4.

Organization of the church, 1834.


Fischer, J.L. "Solutions for the Natchez Paradox." Ethnology 3, no. 1 (Jan. 1964): 53-65.

Suggests possible scenarios to resolve the debate generated by J.R. Swanton's interpretation of the Natchez Indians' unusual social class structure.


Fisher, Georgia. "City from the Past." Delta Review 2, no. 2 (Apr./May 1965): 43, 66-67.

Reconstruction of the ceremonial center of the Temple Mound culture (1200-1600 A.D.) at the Winterville Mounds Historical Park (Washington Co.).


Fisher, Georgia. "A New Look at Those Early Deltans." Delta Review 2, no. 1 (Feb./Mar. 1965): 40-41, 66-67.

Origins and purpose of the Winterville Mounds (Washington Co.), a group of rectangular earthen structures which form a ceremonial center.


Fisher, Robert B. The French Invade the South and Lose. N.p.: Shaunnessy, 1984. ii, 50 pp.

Undocumented brief history of the first French settlement at present-day Ocean Springs (Jackson Co.), 1699.


Fite, Gilbert C. Cotton Fields No More: Southern Agriculture, 1865-1980. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1984. xiii, 273 pp.

Includes several pages on the Delta Branch Experiment Station at Stoneville (Washington Co.).


Fitts, Ulvie. "A History of Lee County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1961. xi, 134 l.

Includes information on Chickasaw Indians, founding and early white settlers, Civil War and Reconstruction, politics, agriculture, education, industry, and religion.


Fitzgerald, Margaret Hughes. "Negro Education in Mississippi During Reconstruction." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1972. iii, 92 l.

Covers missionary and Freedmen's Bureau schools and the establishment of a state public school system; suggests that white opposition to public schools, forged in Reconstruction, continued to affect attitudes toward school integration a century later.


Fitzgerald, Michael W. The Union League Movement in the Deep South: Politics and Agricultural Change during Reconstruction. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989. x, 283 pp.

Revisionist history of Unionist clubs, an engine of agrarian protest by freedmen; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Union League Movement in Alabama and Mississippi: Politics and Agricultural Change in the Deep South during Reconstruction," University of California-Los Angeles, 1986.


Fitzgerald, Michael W. "'We Have Found a Moses': Theodore Bilbo, Black Nationalism, and the Greater Liberia Bill of 1939." Journal of Southern History 63, no. 2 (May 1997): 293-320.

U.S. Senator Bilbo's sponsorship of the repatriation bill drew him into an unlikely alliance with Garveyite African Americans and white racists.


Fleener, Nickieann. "'Breaking Down Buyer Resistance': Marketing the 1935 Pittsburgh Courier to Mississippi Blacks." Journalism History 13, no. 3&4 (Autumn/Winter 1986): 78-85.

Innovative marketing strategy employed by African American journalist George Schuyler.


Fleming, Alice. Highways into History. N.Y.: St. Martin's, 1971. x, 150 pp.

Includes chapter on the history of the Natchez Trace and the building of the Natchez trace Parkway.


Fleming, Dale Sallis. "The Other Davis-Reuben of Aberdeen." Journal of Monroe County History 7 (1981): 3-11.

Life of secessionist congressman Reuben Davis (1813-90).


Fleming, Dale Sallis. "Samuel Jameson Gholson." Journal of Monroe County History 8 (1982): 48-56.

Life of General Gholson (1808-83) of Aberdeen.


Fleming, Walter L. "The Early Life of Jefferson Davis." Proceedings of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association 9, no. 1 (1915-16): 151-76.

Genealogy, family lore, childhood, and education.


Fleming, Walter L. "Jefferson Davis, the Negroes and the Negro Problem." Sewanee Review 16, no. 4 (Oct. 1908): 407-27.

Argues that Davis respected his slaves-and his servants, after the war-and treated them well.


Fleming, Walter L. "Jefferson Davis at West Point." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 247-67.

Davis's admission to the U.S. Military Academy, his course of instruction, his life as a cadet, and his associates, 1824-26.


Fleming, Walter L. "Jefferson Davis's Camel Experiment." Popular Science Monthly 74 (Feb. 1909): 141-52.

As secretary of war in the Pierce administration, Davis considered the possibility of importing camels for use in military and civilian transportation; reprinted in the University Bulletin, Louisiana State University, April 1909.


Fleming, Walter L. "Jefferson Davis's First Marriage." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (1912): 21-36.

Courtship and marriage of Davis to Sarah Knox Taylor (d. 1835), daughter of President Zachary Taylor.


Fleming, Walter L. "The Religious Life of Jefferson Davis." Methodist Quarterly Review 59 (1910): 325-42.

Religion in Davis's parents' Baptist home, at the Catholic school he attended, and the role of the Episcopal Church in his adult life.


Flesher, Dale L., and Tonya K. Flesher. "Human Resource Accounting in Mississippi before 1865." Accounting and Business Research 10, no. 39 (Summer 1980): 124-29.

Examines financial records of the Andrew Brown Lumber Company of Natchez (Adams Co.) to determine the extent of the use of industrial slaves and the percentage of company assets invested in their ownership.


Flesher, Dale L., and Michael G. Schumacher. "A Natchez Doctor's Ledgers as a Source of History, 1804-1809." Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 2 (Summer 1996): 177-92.

Interprets ledgers of a Dr. Stephen Duncan (not the planter).


Flesher, Dale L., and Jalal Soroosh. "Riverboat Accounting and Profitability: The Betsey Ann." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 1 (Feb. 1987): 23-33.

Financial analysis, based on revenue and expense statements, of a paddlewheel steamer that traveled between Natchez (Adams Co.) and Louisiana, 1900-1903.


Flick, Warren A. "The Wood Dealer System in Mississippi: An Essay on Regional Economics and Culture." Journal of Forest History 29, no. 3 (July 1985): 131-38.

Economic importance of independent suppliers of wood to pulp and paper mills.


Floyd, Myron David. "An Introduction to and Index of John G. Jones' A Complete History of Methodism as Connected with the Mississippi Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1968. 358 l.

Author prepared his own index to Jones's two-volume work, which was originally published in 1887 and 1908; includes biographical sketch of Jones (1804-88).


Flynt, David. "Run the Fleet: The Career of the C.S. Ram Arkansas." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 2 (May 1989): 107-32.

Twenty-three-day career of the ironclad steamer that successfully fought two battles on the Mississippi River near Vicksburg (Warren Co.), July 15, 1862; crippled in the midst of battle, she was scuttled by her own crew nineteen days later.


Flynt, Wayne. "Southern Higher Education and the Civil War." Civil War History 14, no. 3 (Sept. 1968): 211-25.

Includes mention of the formation of volunteer companies at the University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.) and at Mississippi College in Clinton (Hinds Co.).


Flynt, Wayne. "A Vignette in Southern Labor Politics-the 1936 Mississippi Senatorial Primary." Mississippi Quarterly 26, no. 1 (Winter 1972-73): 89-99.

Organized labor's endorsement of Pat Harrison, Senator Theodore Bilbo's antagonism toward him, and Harrison's rivals for the attention of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.


Foerster, Alma Pauline. "The State University in the Old South." Ph.d. dissertation, Duke University, 1939. iii, 529 l.

Chapter six, "Arts and Sciences in the Old South," deals in part with the movement for a state university in Mississippi and the first thirteen years of the existence of the University of Mississippi.


Folmer, Henry. Franco-Spanish Rivalry in North America, 1524-1763. Glendale, Calif.: Clark, 1953. 346 pp.

See especially "Iberville Discovers the Mississippi."


Fontaine, Hosford Latimer. Allison's Wells: The Last Mississippi Spa, 1889-1963. Canton, Miss.: Muscadine, 1981. 68 pp.

History of the popular Madison County resort, destroyed by fire in 1963.


Foote, Shelby. Fredericksburg to Meridian. N.Y.: Random House, 1963. Vol. 2 of The Civil War: A Narrative. 988 pp.

Chapter four, "The Beleaguered City," deals with the siege of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) and with fighting around Jackson (Hinds Co.), 1863.


Force, M.F. From Fort Henry to Corinth. N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1881. vii, 202 pp.

Includes one chapter on the battle of Corinth (Alcorn Co.), 1862.


Ford, Evelyn Odell. "A History of the Mathematicians in the Colleges and the University of Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1939. iii, 53 l.

Reviews careers of over 250 mathematics professors, 1848-1939.


Ford, Florence Futvoye. "New Families-New Industry." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 40 (Dec. 1986): 1-2.

Establishment of the Futvoye-Paterson Lumber Company, 1914.


Ford, William Benjamin. "The Mississippi Press and the Kossuth 'Craze,' 1851-52.

M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1960. 80 l.

Examines reasons for the hostility of Mississippians toward Magyar Louis Kossuth, who toured the United States to garner support for Hungarian independence from Austria.


Foreman, Carolyn Thomas. "Charity Hall: An Early Chickasaw School." Chronicles of Oklahoma 11, no. 3 (Sept. 1933): 912-26.

Presbyterian mission school established in 1820 near Cotton Gin Port (Monroe Co.).


Foreman, Grant. Indian Removal: The Emigration of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1932. 415 pp.

Books one and three cover the forced removal of the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes from Mississippi in the 1830s.


Foreman, Paul Breck. "Mississippi Population Trends." Ph.D. dissertation, Vanderbilt University, 1939. xii, 169 l.

Traces migration and population trends by race, age, and gender, 1880-1930.


Foreman, Paul B., and Julien R. Tatum. "A Short History of Mississippi's State Penal Systems." Mississippi Law Journal 10, no. 2 (Feb. 1938): 255-77.

Traces penitentiary reform in the state, 1809-1938, from agitation for a central prison through implementation of the auburn cell-block system, abandonment of prisons, and advent of the convict lease system, to organization of penal plantations and the backlash against them.


Fortenberry, Joseph E. "James Kimble Vardaman and American Foreign Policy, 1913-1919." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 2 (May 1973): 127-40.

As junior U.S. senator from Mississippi, Vardaman opposed intervention in World War I, colonialism, and non-Caucasian immigration.


Forty-Fourth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1926-1927. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1928. 555 pp.

Includes book-length article, "Social and Religious Beliefs and Usages of the Chickasaw Indians," by John R. Swanton, which documents family relationships, society, government, punishment, childbirth, education, labor, death, war, hunting, games, measurement, communication, religion, dances, and medicine.


Foster, E.C. "A Time of Challenge: Afro-Mississippi Political Developments since 1965." Journal of Negro History 68, no. 2 (Spring 1983): 185-20.

Argues that despite election of African Americans to public office, the power dynamic within the state has remained largely unchanged.


Fowler, Lula Mae. "History of Panola County, 1836-1860." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1960. 100 l.

Establishment of the county, early settlers, economy, transportation, education, religion, and social and civil life; includes information on twelve communities.


Fowler, William B. "The History of Jefferson College of Washington, Mississippi, Prior to the War of Southern Independence." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1937. [v], 83 l.

Establishment, development, and significance of the Adams County school, 1802-63.


Frank, Joe. "In Defense of Hutchins's Natchez Indian." Mississippi Archaeology 10, no. 4 (Apr. 1975): 7-12.

Argues that some Natchez who survived the annihilation of 1732 could be located as late as the 1780s.


Frank, William L. Sherwood Bonner. Boston: Twayne, 1976. 158 pp.

Biography of Catherine Sherwood Bonner McDowell (1849-83) of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), one of the first writers to employ Negro dialect; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Catherine Sherwood Bonner McDowell: A Critical Biography," Northwestern University, 1964.


Frankel, Noralee. "Workers, Wives, and Mothers: Black Women in Mississippi, 1860-1870." Ph.D. dissertation, George Washington University, 1983. ii, 237 l.

Effect of war, emancipation, continuing planter domination, and changing family and community dynamics on African American women.


Franklin, John Hope, and Genna Rae McNeil, eds. African Americans and the Living Constitution. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1995. xvi, 364 pp.

Includes "Remembering Litigation, Protest, and Politics in Mississippi During the Civil Rights Movement," by George W. Crockett, Jr., which describes the attempt in 1964 to establish a field office of the Committee for Legal Assistance; and "Political and Social Change in Mississippi Since 1965," by Frank R. Parker, which assesses changes in voting rights, education, and employment opportunities for African Americans.


Frantz, Joe B. "Gail Borden: Amite County's First Inventor." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 4 (Oct. 1949): 223-30.

Borden, who later invented the procedure for condensing milk, lived seven years (1822-29) of his early adulthood in Amite County.


Frantz, Joe B. Gail Borden: Dairyman to a Nation. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1951. xiii, 310 pp.

Chapter five, "Days Along the Milk and Cider, 1822-1829," contains information about the Amite County years of Borden (1801-74), inventor of condensed milk.


Frascogna, Xavier Michael, Jr. "Catholic Education in Jackson, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1970. 63 l.

History of primary and secondary schools since 1855.


Fraser, Walter J., Jr., and Winfred B. Moore, Jr., eds. From the Old South to the New: Essays on the Transitional South. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1981. xiii, 286 pp.

Includes "Labor Dependency among Freedmen, 1865-1880," by Ronald L.F. Davis, which examines the origins and nature of sharecropping in the Natchez District (Adams Co, Mississippi, and Concordia Parish, Louisiana).


Frazier, Josephine. "James Street: A Bio-Bibliography." M.A. thesis, Florida State University, 1958. ii, 78 l.

Biography of writer James Howell Street (1903-54) of Lumberton (Lamar Co.) confined to chapter one.


Free, Joseph Miller. "The Ante-Bellum Theatre of the Old Natchez Region." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 1 (Jan. 1943): 14-27.

History of thriving theaters in Southwest Mississippi, especially in Natchez (Adams Co.), Vicksburg (Warren Co.), and Port Gibson and Grand Gulf (Claiborne Co.); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Studies in American Theatre History: The Theatre of Southwestern Mississippi to 1840," Iowa State University, 1941.


French, Warren Graham. "A Sketch of the Life of Joseph Holt Ingraham." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 3 (July 1949): 155-71. Ingraham was a minor novelist and Episcopal clergyman who served churches in Natchez (Adams Co.) and Holly Springs (Marshall Co.); based on the author's master's thesis, "Joseph Holt Ingraham, Southern Romancer, 1809-1860," University of Texas, 1948.


Frey, Herman S. Jefferson Davis. Nashville, Tenn.: the author, 1978. 95 pp.

Brief undocumented biography.


Fridlington, Robert. The Reconstruction Court, 1864-1888. Danbury, Conn.: Grolier, 1986. xiii, 244 pp.

Includes material on Justice L.Q.C. Lamar, and on significant U.S. Supreme Court cases: Ex parte Milligan, Mississippi v. Johnson, and Ex parte McCardle.


Friedland, Michael B. Lift Up Your Voice Like a Trumpet: White Clergy and the Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998. x, 326 pp.

Includes many briefs mentions of Mississippi clergy and events, including Will D. Campbell, Edwin King, the integration of the University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.), and Freedom Summer.


Fulton, Charles Ray. "A History of Kemper County, Mississippi, 1860-1910." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1968. 85 l.

Kemper Countians in Civil War and post-Reconstruction racial violence, and politics, economy, religion, and education in the county.


Funderburk, Doris Evelyn. "The Mississippi Railroad." Journal of Monroe County History 1 (1974-75): 12-16.

Building of Itawamba County's only railroad, 1921-25.


Futrell, Robert Frank. "Economic Readjustment during Reconstruction, 1865-1875." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1939. 236 l.

Economic changes, such as increase in manufacturing, greater reliance on railroads, and establishment of the sharecropping system.


Futrell, Robert F. "Efforts of Mississippians to Encourage Immigration, 1865-1880." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 2 (Apr. 1958): 59-76.

Immigration societies, newspapers, and the state legislature sought to attract laborers from other states and from Europe to augment a dwindling pool of African American labor.


Gallagher, Richard Carter. "Prelude to Redemption: The 1874 Vicksburg Riot." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1983. iv, 130 l.

Revisionist history of an incident that helped bring an end to Reconstruction; examines causes, identities of the rioters, and the extent to which the violence in Vicksburg (Warren Co.) spread to other places.


Gallalee, Jack C. "Andrew Ellicott and the Ellicott Stone." Alabama Review 18, no. 2 (Apr. 1965): 92-105.

Life and times of Ellicott (1754-1820), the surveyor who marked the thirty-first parallel in 1799 with the so-called Ellicott Stone, which still remains.


Galloway, Charles B. "Aaron Burr in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 237-45.

Criticizes Burr for his early nineteenth-century schemes to seek power and public approbation.


Galloway, Charles Betts. "Elizabeth Female Academy-the Mother of Female Colleges." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 169-78.

Argues that the Washington (Adams Co.), Mississippi, school, 1818-c. 1843, was first women's college in the South.


Galloway, Charles B. "Lorenzo Dow in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 233-44.

Account of three visits to Mississippi (1803, 1804-1805, and 1816) by the itinerant Methodist evangelist (1777-1834).


Galloway, Charles B. "Thomas Griffin: A Boanerges of the Early Southwest." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 153-70.

Vignettes of the life of the itinerant Methodist preacher (1787-1850).


Galloway, Craddock Dubose. "Mississippi Agriculture, 1929-1935: The Study of Diversification and Crop Production During the Great Depression." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1963. 87 l.

Success of government entities in convincing Mississippi farmers to reduce cotton acreages and instead to grow food for humans and livestock at a self-sufficient level.


Galloway, G. Norton. "A Confederacy within a Confederacy." Magazine of American History 16, no. 4 (Oct. 1886): 387-90.

This article may be the source of the persistent "Republic of Jones" myth, which erroneously claims that Jones County seceded from the state of Mississippi and from the Confederacy in 1862 in order to form the Jones County Confederacy.


Galloway, Patricia. "Choctaw Factionalism and Civil War, 1746-1750." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 4 (Nov. 1982): 289-327.

Reveals many sources of complex factionalism among the Choctaw Indians.


Galloway, Patricia. Choctaw Genesis, 1500-1700. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1995. Indians of the Southeast series. xv, 411 pp.

Examines the ethnic origins of the Choctaw people in the protohistoric period using archaeological, cartographical, and linguistic evidence.


Galloway, Patricia, ed. The Hernando de Soto Expedition: History, Historiography, and "Discovery" in the Southeast. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997. xvi, 457 pp.

Essays on various aspects of the expedition, including "From Chiefdom to Tribe in Northeast Mississippi: The Soto Expedition as a Window on a Culture in Transition," by Jay K. Johnson.


Galloway, Patricia K., ed. LaSalle and His Legacy: Frenchmen and Indians in the Lower Mississippi Valley. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1982. xiv, 260 pp.

Essays on three themes: "LaSalle's Expedition of 1682," "The Beginnings of French Colonialism in the Southeast," and "French Settlement and Indian Neighbors."


Galloway, Patricia K., ed. Native, European, and African Cultures in Mississippi, 1500-1800. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1991. 103 pp.

Includes "African and Atlantic Background to Early Mississippi History," by Joseph C. Miller; "Indians of Mississippi, 1540-1700," by Marvin T. Smith; "Nature and Sequence of the Spanish Borderlands," by Paul Hoffman; "Formation of Historic Tribes and the French Colonial Period," by Patricia Galloway; "African Slavery in Provincial Mississippi," by Ulysses S. Ricard, Jr.; and "A Brief History of Mississippi, 1540-1817," by William S. Coker.


Galloway, Patricia. "'So Many Little Republics': British Negotiations with the Choctaw Confederacy, 1765." Ethnohistory 41, no. 4 (Fall 1994): 513-37.

Demonstrates that the Choctaw were an ethnically diverse people who dealt with the outside world through a confederacy that lent them enhanced political power.


Gandy, Joan W., and Thomas H. Gandy. The Mississippi Steamboat Era in Historic Photographs: Natchez to New Orleans, 1870-1920. N.Y.: Dover, 1987. vii, 120 pp.

Extensively illustrates the heyday of steamboat travel on the river, especially boats and their interiors docked at Natchez (Adams Co.) before 1900.


Gandy, Joan, and Thomas H. Gandy. Norman's Natchez, an Early Photographer and His Town. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1978. 223 pp.

Over two hundred photographs of Natchez (Adams Co.) and Mississippi River scenes, 1870-1913, taken by professional photographer Henry C. Norman (1850-1913).


Gannett, Henry. "The Origin of Certain Place Names in the State of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 339-49.

Gazetteer of over two hundred town and county names.


Ganus, Clifton Loyd, Jr. "The Freedmen's Bureau in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, Tulane University, 1953. xii, 409 l.

Finds that despite its faults, the bureau accomplished many things for the newly-freed slaves.


Gardner, Bettye J. "William H. Foote and Yazoo County Politics, 1866-1883." Southern Studies 21, no. 4 (Winter 1982): 398-407.

Life and death of Foote (1843-83), the Oberlin-educated Vicksburg (Warren Co.) native who became one of the most outspoken African American politicians of his day and who was murdered early in the wave of late nineteenth-century lynchings.


Garner, Alfred W. "Folsom's Pigeon Roost, the Nineteenth Century Stage Traveler's Mecca, on the Natchez Trace." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 1 (Jan. 1942): 34-37.

Travelers' stand operated by Choctaw David Folsom.


Garner, Alfred W. "Public Services of E.C. Walthall." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 239-53.

Senatorial career, 1885-98, of Edward D. Walthall (1831-98).


Garner, James W. "The First Struggle over Secession in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 89-104.

Secessionist ferment following the Compromise of 1850, including the formation of States' Rights associations, the "Resister" movement, the Union Party, the 1851 Foote-Quitman gubernatorial contest, and the 1851 Jackson (Hinds Co.) convention.


Garner, James W. Reconstruction in Mississippi. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1901. xiii, 422 pp.

Traditional view of Reconstruction and the Democratic "revolution" of 1875; Richard N. Current's introduction to the 1968 reprint (Louisiana State University Press) identifies the book as the most important state Reconstruction study of the Dunning school.


Garner, James W. "The Senatorial Career of J.Z. George." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 245-62.

Committee assignments and speeches, 1881-96, of U.S. Senator James Zachariah George (1826-97).


Garner, James Wilford. "The State Government of Mississippi During the Civil War." Political Science Quarterly 16, no. 2 (June 1901): 283-302.

Examines the mechanics of replacing federal with state offices following secession, 1861.


Gass, W. Conrad. "Franklin L. Riley and the Historical Renaissance in Mississippi, 1897-1914." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 3 (Aug. 1970): 195-227.

Mississippi career of Riley, the first holder of a permanent chair in history at the University of Mississippi, the reviver of the Mississippi Historical Society, and the founder of Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, the state's first historical journal.


Gates, Paul Wallace. "Federal Land Policies in the South, 1866-1888." Journal of Southern History 6, no. 3 (Aug. 1940): 303-30.

Argues that the states of Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Alabama, and Florida were laboratories for experiments in land reform; charts for each state demonstrate how the Southern Homestead Act penalized land speculators.


Gates, Paul W. "Federal Land Policies in the Southern Public Land States." Agricultural History 53, no. 1 (Jan. 1979): 206-27.

Nineteenth-century disposition of public lands in Mississippi, Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, and Louisiana.


Gates, William L. "The Agricultural Revolution in the Delta." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 2 (May 1969): 79-88.

Focuses on the Delta Branch Experiment Station at Stoneville (Washington Co.), which, beginning in 1904, worked on insect control, cotton ginning, and machine harvesting improvements that led to the mechanization of cotton production.


Gates, William Bryan. "Performances of Shakespeare in Ante-Bellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 1 (Jan. 1943): 28-37.

Performances in Natchez (Adams Co.) and Vicksburg (Warren Co.), 1814-60.


Gates, William Bryan. "The Theatre in Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 2 (Apr. 1941): 71-129.

Lists plays and concerts, 1809-50, and speculates on the reasons for the Natchez (Adams Co.) theater's demise after 1850.


Gatewood, Williard B. Aristocrats of Color: The Black Elite, 1880-1920. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. xii, 450 pp.

Includes material on U.S. senator Blanche Kelso Bruce and his family, mention of composer William Grant Still, and a photograph of Henry Baker.


Gatewood, Willard B. "Theodore Roosevelt and the Indianola Affair." Journal of Negro History 53, no. 1 (Jan. 1968): 48-69.

Uses the story of the attempted ouster of African American Republican postmistress Minnie Cox of Indianola (Sunflower Co.) and the subsequent closing of her post office by President Roosevelt in 1903 to illustrate the depth of political and racial animosity in the state at the turn of the century.


"The Gathright Schools: Summerville Institute, Gathright College, Summerville Female Seminary." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 3 (Sept. 1977): 1-4.

Schools founded by brothers Thomas S. and Zebulon C. Gathright, 1845-60s.


Gautier, Bernard. "Racial Prejudice and Discretionary Justice: Executions for Armed Robbery in Mississippi, 1932-1974." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1985. v, 193 l.

Concludes that African American armed robbery defendants often received the death penalty.


Gayle, Addison. Richard Wright: Ordeal of a Native Son. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor/Doubleday, 1980. xvi, 342 pp.

Emphasizes Wright's problems with the FBI and his membership in the Communist Party.


Gee, Mrs. O.K., Sr. [Reecie Gillespie Gee]. The History of Middleton, Carroll County, Mississippi. Winona, Miss.: Lowry Printing, 1961. 14 pp.

Focuses on early settlers.


Geiser, Samuel Wood. Naturalists of the Frontier. Dallas, Tex.: Southern Methodist University Press, 1937. 341 pp.

Includes chapter on Gideon Lincecum (1783-1874), naturalist, physician, and authority on Native American languages and customs, who lived near Columbus (Lowndes Co.) from 1818 to 1848.


Genovese, Eugene D. "The Medical and Insurance Costs of Slaveholding in the Cotton Belt." Journal of Negro History 45, no. 3 (July 1960): 141-55.

Uses manuscript sources to establish medical and insurance costs for various sizes of Mississippi plantations in 1850.


Gentry, Claude. The Battle of Corinth. Baldwyn, Miss.: Magnolia, 1976. 43 pp.

Brief undocumented account of the 1862 battle in Alcorn County and of the battles of Booneville (Prentiss Co.) and Iuka (Tishomingo Co.) that preceded it.


Gentry, Claude. The Guns of Kinnie Wagner. Baldwyn, Miss.: Magnolia, 1969. 108 pp.

Life of outlaw William Kenneth Wagner (1903-58), who escaped from Parchman Penitentiary and lived as a fugitive for eight years.


Gerow, Richard Oliver. Catholicity in Mississippi. Natchez, Miss.: n.p., 1939. 492 pp.

Catholic church in Mississippi from the sixteenth century to the 1930s; includes biographical information on priests and histories of individual churches, orphanages, schools, and monasteries.


Gerow, Richard Oliver. Cradle Days of St. Mary's at Natchez. Marrero, La.: Hope Haven, 1941. xiii, 302 pp.

Catholic church in Natchez (Adams Co.) before the Civil War; includes information on African American members, tenure of priests and bishops, the building of the cathedral, and the establishment of orphanages and schools.


Getchell, Charles Munro, Jr. "Defender of Inland Waters: Military Career of Isaac Newton Brown, Commander, Confederate States Navy, 1861-1865." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1978. 149 l.

Brown (1817-89) was captain of the Arkansas on July 15, 1862, when the ironclad engaged Union vessels near Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Gibson, Arrell M. The Chickasaws. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971. xv, 312 pp.

First seven chapters devoted to history and customs of the Chickasaw in Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, and Kentucky before their removal to Oklahoma in 1837.


Gilbert, Jennifer. "'I Didn't Fail to Tell It': A Biography of Amzie Moore." M.A. thesis, University of Wisconsin, 1996. I, 178 l.

Life of civil rights activist Moore (b. 1911) of Cleveland (Bolivar Co.).


Gill, Virgil Clifton. "The Economic History of Jackson County in the Twentieth Century." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1944. 122 l.

Includes information on agriculture and the lumber, fishing, and shipbuilding industries, 1915-44.


Gillespie, Neal C. The Collapse of Orthodoxy: The Intellectual Ordeal of George Frederick Holmes. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1972. x, 273 pp.

Intellectual biography of Holmes (1820-97), first president of the University of Mississippi (Oxford, Lafayette Co.), 1848-49; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "George Frederick Holmes and the Philosophy of Faith: A Study in the Religious Crisis of American Orthodoxy in the Nineteenth Century," Duke University, 1964.


Gillespie, Neal C. "George Frederick Holmes and the Philosophy of History." South Atlantic Quarterly 67, no. 3 (Summer 1968): 486-98.

Traces the intellectual evolution of Holmes (1820-97), first president of the University of Mississippi (Oxford, Lafayette Co.).


Gillespie, Neal C. "Ole Miss: A New Look at Her First President." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 4 (Nov. 1968): 275-90.

Blames George Frederick Holmes's unhappily brief tenure (1848-49) at the University of Mississippi (Oxford, Lafayette Co.) on the failure of his disciplinary system based on personal honor.


Gillespie, Neal C. "The Spiritual Odyssey of George Frederick Holmes: A Study of Religious Conservatism in the Old South." Journal of Southern History 32, no. 3 (Aug. 1966): 291-307.

Traces the intellectual evolution of Holmes (1820-97), British-born first president of the University of Mississippi (Oxford, Lafayette Co.), concentrating on his religious thought and his defense of slavery.


Gillespie, Robert G. "Virgil Alexis Griffith, 1874-1953." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 3 (Aug. 1975): 267-78.

Sketch of the chief justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court, who wrote a dissent in Brown v. Mississippi, a landmark case concerning the rights of defendants, which was reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1936.


Gillette, William. Retreat from Reconstruction, 1869-1879. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1979. xiv, 436 pp.

Chapter six, "Politics or War? The Federal Response to Arkansas and Mississippi," deals in part with the U.S. Grant administration's failure to suppress white violence against freedmen in Mississippi, 1874-76.


Gilliland, Charles. "The 4-County Electric Power Association in Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 11 (Sept. 1979): 8.

Rural electrification in Noxubee, Clay, Lowndes, and Oktibbeha counties, 1937-79.


Gillson, Gordon E. "The Development of a Military Frontier: The Story of Fort Adams and Its Hinterland." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1954. ix, 130 l.

Brief life of a frontier fort in Wilkinson County, 1798-1810.


Gilmore, William R., II. "Senatorial Election of 1947." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1979. iii, 112 l.

Special election following the death of Senator Theodore G. Bilbo; examines reasons for the victory of John C. Stennis.


Ginzl, David J. "Lily-Whites Versus Black-and-Tans: Mississippi Republicans during the Hoover Administration." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 3 (Aug. 1980): 194-211.

Conflict between the majority-white and majority-black factions of the state's Republican Party in the 1928 presidential campaign.


Giroux, Vincent A., Jr. "The Rise of Theodore G. Bilbo (1908-1932)." Journal of Mississippi History 43, no. 3 (Aug. 1981): 180-209.

Reviews the political environment, including the support of James K. Vardaman, that Bilbo exploited in his rise to power in state government.


Viroux, Vincent Arthur, Jr. "Theodore G. Bilbo: Progressive to Public Racist." Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana University, 1984. 333 l.

Examines the reasons for U.S. senator Bilbo's increasing racial prejudice in the 1940s and reveals the extent to which his pronouncements led to his near-removal from office.


Gist, Sylvia Reedy. Educating a Southern Rural Community: A History of Schooling for Blacks in Holmes County, Mississippi, 1870 to 1993. Pelham, Ala.: Productivity Unlimited, 1995. xv, 329 l.

Examines the county's schools since Reconstruction; reprints the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Educating a Southern Rural Community: The Case of Blacks in Holmes County, Mississippi, 1870 to Present," University of Chicago, 1994.


Gitlin, Jay. "Crossroads on the Chinaberry Coast: Natchez and the Creole World of the Mississippi Valley." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 4 (Nov. 1992): 365-84.

Shows that colonial Natchez (Adams Co.) was a multicultural and multilingual city and downplays its geographical isolation.


Gladney, Louise. "History of Pleasant Hill Plantation, 1811-1867." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1932. I, 80 l.

Operation of Pleasant Hill, an Amite County plantation owned by Littleton and Eli J. Capell.


Gleason, David K. Text by Mary Warren Miller and Ronald W. Miller. The Great Houses of Natchez. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1986. xiv, 122 pp.

Color photographs and descriptions of fifty-nine antebellum mansions and public buildings.


Gleeson, David Thomas. "The Mississippi Irish, 1700-1865." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1993. 134 l.

Role of Irish immigrants in colonial and antebellum Mississippi.


Glenn, Audrey. "A Vanderbilt at Greenwood: The Star of the West." Journal of Mississippi History 16, no. 4 (Oct. 1954): 258-67.

Military strategy behind the deliberate sinking of the Confederacy's own side-wheeler in the Tallahatchie River near Greenwood (Leflore Co.), 1863.


Glynn, Karen Marie. "Mule Racing in the Mississippi Delta, 1938-1950." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1995. 133 l.

Describes annual races at Greenwood (Leflore Co.) and Rosedale (Bolivar Co.).


Godlove, Lewis William. "A History of the Mississippi Education Association." Ed.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1961. 352 l.

Institutional history, 1838-1958.


Goldfarb, Stephen J. "A Note on Limits to the Growth of the Cotton-Textile Industry in the Old South." Journal of Southern History 48, no. 4 (Nov. 1982): 545-58.

Mentions Mississippi's first textile mill, built near Natchez (Adams Co.) in 1842.


Goldman, Albert. Elvis. N.Y.: McGraw-Hill, 1981. x, 598 pp.

Undocumented biography of rock 'n' roll star Elvis Aaron Presley (1935-77) of Tupelo (Lee Co.).


Gonzales, John E. "Henry Stuart Foote in Exile-1865." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 2 (Apr. 1953): 90-98.

Former U.S. senator and governor Foote was expelled from the Confederacy and exiled by the U.S. government for most of 1865.


Gonzales, John Edmond. "Henry Stuart Foote: A Forgotten Unionist of the Fifties." Southern Quarterly 1, no. 2 (Jan. 1963): 129-39.

Examines the role of Foote (1804-80) in the Compromise of 1850, his support of Unionism despite growing states' rights and secessionist sentiment, and his decision to support secession in 1861.


Gonzales, John E. "Henry Stuart Foote: Confederate Congressman and Exile." Civil War History 11 (1965): 384-95.

Discusses ardent Unionism and changing political loyalties of Foote (1804-80), U.S. senator, governor of Mississippi, and strident opponent of Jefferson Davis.


Gonzales, John Edmond. "John Anthony Quitman in the United States House of Representatives, 1855-1858." Southern Quarterly 4, no. 3 (Apr. 1966): 276-88.

Covers the ill health of Quitman (1799-1858) while in the House, his support of the Lecompton Constitution, and his disappointment at not securing the Democratic vice presidential nomination.


Gonzales, John Edmond, ed. A Mississippi Reader: Selected Articles from The Journal of Mississippi History. Jackson: Mississippi Historical Society, 1980. xv, 328 pp.

Collection of previously published articles.


Gonzales, John Edmond. "The Public Career of Henry Stuart Foote (1804-1880)." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina, 1957. 296 l.

Biographical study of the controversial U.S. senator and governor of Mississippi.


Gonzales, John Edmond. "Some Further Observations on the Recent Writing of Mississippi History." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 1 (Feb. 1979): 83-98.

Discusses works published in the 1970s, including the McLemore history (1973) and the Loewen and Sallis textbook (1974).


Gordon, Armistead C. Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1918. viii, 329 pp.

Portrays the president of the Confederate States of America as a tragic figure.


Gordon, James F., Jr. A History of Belhaven College, 1894 to 1981. Jackson, Miss.: Belhaven College, 1982. ix, 160 pp.

History of the Presbyterian school in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Goree, Cathryn T. "Steps toward Redefinition: Coeducation at Mississippi State College, 1930-1945." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1993. 213 l.

Halting progress toward full acceptance of women at the formerly all-male institution.


Goss, Charles Wayne. "The French and the Choctaw Indians, 1700-1763." Ph.D. dissertation, Texas Tech University, 1977. iv, 225 l.

Earliest relations of the French with Indian tribes of the Southeast, particularly the Choctaw in what is now East Central Mississippi.


Gower, Herschel. "The Dahlgrens and Jefferson Davis." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 3 (Aug. 1993): 179-201.

Dalhgren family's animosity toward Davis: one family member plotted to assassinate him, and several family members contested the will of kinswoman Sarah Ann Ellis Dorsey (d. 1879), who bequeathed Beauvoir (Biloxi, Harrison Co.) to Davis.


Grabowski, Conrad Erich. "The New Deal Agricultural Relief Programs in Leflore County." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1971. 96 l.

Depression-era federal programs administered by county agent J.S. McBee saved many cotton farmers from bankruptcy.


Grafton, C.W. "A Sketch of the Old Scotch Settlement at Union Church." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 263-71.

Section of southern Jefferson and western Lincoln counties where Highland Scots families from North Carolina and Tennessee settled in the early nineteenth century.


Graham, Hardy P. "Bilbo and the University of Mississippi, 1928-1932." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1965. 131 l.

Argues that Governor Theodore G. Bilbo's unsuccessful attempt to move the University of Mississippi from Oxford (Lafayette Co.) to Jackson (Hinds Co.) was inspired not by politics but by a desire to improve the institution.


Graham, John H. Mississippi Circuit Riders, 1865-1965. Nashville, Tenn.: Parthenon, 1967. 229 pp.

Institutional history of the (African American) Upper Mississippi Conference of the Methodist Church in North Mississippi.


Grant, Ethan A. "The Natchez Revolt of 1781: A Reconsideration." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 4 (Nov. 1994): 309-24.

Uses previously unexamined sources to reevaluate the revolt of Natchez (Adams Co.) settlers against Spanish rule; appendix gives information about persons involved in the revolt.


Grant, Ethan Allen, Jr. "They Stayed On: The British Settler Community at Natchez, 1765-1800." Ph.D. dissertation, Auburn University, 1993. 299 l.

Ways in which British settlers in Natchez (Adams Co.) became "Anglo-Spaniards" during the period of Spanish rule.


Grant, Harold Lafayette, Jr. "The Southern Paper Company, 1911-1928." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1958. 70 l.

Business history of the company whose primary mill was located near Moss Point (Jackson Co.).


Grant, Philip A., Jr. "Editorial Reaction to the Harrison-Barkley Senate Leadership Contest, 1937." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 2 (May 1974): 127-41.

Finds that most newspaper editors believed that the close defeat of Byron "Pat" Harrison for U.S. Senate floor leader revealed a serious Democratic Party split that harmed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's influence in Congress.


Grant, Philip A., Jr. "The Mississippi Congressional Delegation and the Formation of the Conservative Coalition, 1937-1940." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 1 (Feb. 1988): 21-28.

Six of the nine members of the state's congressional delegation were conservative Democrats who challenged President Franklin D. Roosevelt's domestic reform programs.


Grant, Philip A, Jr. "Ten Mississippians Who Served in Congress, 1931-1937." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 3 (Aug. 1977): 205-12.

Mississippi's congressional delegation during the Great Depression: representatives Robert S. Hall, E. Quin, James W. Collier, T. Jeff Busby, A. Collins, Wall Doxey, William M. Whittington, and John E. Rankin.


Grantham, Dewey W. Southern Progressivism: The Reconciliation of Progress and Tradition. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1983. Twentieth Century America series. xxii, 468 pp.

Portion of chapter two reviews the "new age in southern politics" in Mississippi, including discussion of James K. Vardaman and Theodore G. Bilbo.


Graves, Fred R. North Mississippi Presbytery: A Chronological List of the Churches, Ministers, Candidates, Moderators, Stated Clerks, and Commissioners to the General Assembly, from the Organization of the Presbytery in 1856 through the Church Year 1941-42. N.p., n.d. 48 pp.

Includes history of the presbytery.


Graves, Fred R. The Presbyterian Work in Mississippi. Sumner, Miss.: Sentinel, 1927. 142 pp.

Includes history of the denomination in the state, 1800-1927, and of the institutions it sponsored.


Gray, Frederick W., and Chester D. Bradley. "The Medical History of Jefferson Davis." Virginia Medical Monthly 94 (Jan. 1967): 19-23.

Based on John J. Craven's contemporary account, Prison Life of Jefferson Davis (1866).


Gray, Lewis Cecil. Assisted by Esther Katherine Thompson. History of Agriculture in the Southern United States to 1860. Washington: Carnegie Institution, 1933. 2 vols.

See especially chapters four, "Agriculture in the Lower Mississippi Valley and Gulf Coast Plain in the Eighteenth Century;" thirty-seven, "Expansion of the Plantation System on the Basis of Cotton;" and thirty-nine, "The Attempted Readjustment of Southern Economic Life."


Gray, Ricky Harold. "Corona Female College (1857-1864)." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 2 (May 1980): 129-34.


Gray, William F. Imperial Bolivar. [Cleveland, Miss.]: n.p., 1923. 94 pp.

Covers agriculture, Civil War, flood control, public health, and county leaders, and includes essays on towns of Cleveland, Rosedale, Merigold, Shelby, Duncan, Alligator, Boyle, Pace, and Gunnison.


Greaves, Linda Thompson, et al, eds. Jackson Landmarks. Jackson: Junior League of Jackson, Miss., 1982. vii, 207 pp.

Illustrates historic houses and other structures.


Green, A. Wigfall. The Man Bilbo. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1963. xiii, 150 pp.

First biography of Theodore G. Bilbo (1877-1947), controversial governor and U.S. senator.


Green, Albert Henley. "A Financial and Historical Study of the First National Bank of West Point, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1958. 82 l.

Examines reasons for the success of the oldest national bank in the state, founded in 1872.


Green, Fletcher M. "Democracy in the Old South." Journal of Southern History 13, no. 1 (Feb. 1946): 3-23.

History of southern state constitutions and governments, 1776-1860; argues that Mississippi fell into the hands of the landed aristocracy in the period.


Green, Gabriel Collins. "Jasper County: A Prospect, 1833-1968." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1968. vi, 113 l.

Includes chapters on geography, early settlement, government, agriculture, labor and industry, transportation, culture, recreation, and economy.


Green, John A. "Governor Perier's Expedition Against the Natchez Indians." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 19, no. 3 (July 1936): 547-77.

Aftermath of the 1729 massacre of the Natchez by the French army under the Louisiana governor; illustrations include a map of the army's route.


Green, Margaret. President of the Confederacy: Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Julian Messner, 1963. 191 pp.

Sympathetic popular biography.


Greenberg, Kenneth S. "The Civil War and the Redistribution of Land: Adams County, Mississippi, 1860-1870." Agricultural History 52, no. 2 (Apr. 1978): 292-307.

Quantitative study based on manuscript census data assesses the extent to which Natchez area planters' lands were redistributed in the Civil War decade.


Greene, Francis Vinton. The Mississippi. N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1882. ix, 276 pp.

Civil War military operations within Mississippi and along the Mississippi River in Louisiana, with emphasis on Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Greene, Kate. "Torts over Tempo: The Life and Career of Judge Burnita Shelton Matthews." Journal of Mississippi History 56, no. 3 (Aug. 1994): 181-210.

Struggles and accomplishments of Matthews (1894-1988) of Copiah County, the first woman appointed to a federal district court, 1950.


Greenway, John. "Jimmie Rodgers-A Folksong Catalyst." Journal of American Folklore 70 no. 277 (July/Sept. 1957): 231-34.

Life and music of country musician James Charles "Jimmie" Rodgers (1897-1933) of Meridian (Lauderdale Co.), the "singing brakeman;" includes discussion of railroad culture and African American folk music influences.


Greenwell, Dale. "Pre-Historic Cultural Diffusion and Migration in Southeast Mississippi." Mississippi Geographer 2, no. 1 (Spring 1974): 19-26.

Includes information on migration, settlement patterns, Poverty Point culture, and Temple Mound peoples.


Greenwell, "A Research into the Origin, Development, and Decline of the Indian Tribes of the Mississippi Gulf Coast between ca. 1200 and 1831 A.D." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1974. 85 l.

Describes historic coastal peoples (Biloxis, Pascagoulas, Bayougoulas, and Acolapissas) and attributes their extinction to acculturation and outmigration in the post-contact period.


Greenwell, Dale. Twelve Flags-Triumphs and Tragedies. Ocean Springs, Miss.: the author, 1968. [viii], 75 pp.

Brief history of the Mississippi Gulf Coast to 1799.


Greer, James M. "James Lockhart Autry." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1 (Centenary Series, 1916): 457-62.

Sketch of Autry (1830-62) of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), who died at the Battle of Stone River, Tennessee, in 1862.


Gregg, William B. "The Agrarian Movement in Grenada County." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1953. vii, 107 l.

Covers genesis of the movement in the 1870s, the Farmers' Alliance and the Populist Party, and the decline of the movement as the Democratic Party embraced many of the movement's ideals by the turn of the century.


Gregory, Andrew Grant. "The Chickasaw Indian Colbert Family, an American Dynasty Era, 1729-1907." Journal of Monroe County History 6 (1980): 38-42.

Accomplishments of family members.



Gregory, Andrew Grant. "Monroe County's Bygone Steamboat Era and Captain Billy Johnson." Journal of Monroe County History 7 (1981): 20-25.

Tombigbee River steamboating, 1818-80s.


Gregory, Chellis O'Neal, Jr. "Pat Harrison and the New Deal." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1960. 172 l.

Role of conservative Democratic senator Byron "Pat" Harrison in the enactment of President Roosevelt's emergency economic legislation during the Great Depression of the 1930s.


Griffin, Richard W. "Manufacturing Interests of Mississippi Planters, 1810-1832." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 2 (Apr. 1960): 110-22.

Focuses on an early but unsuccessful cotton mill campaign in Natchez (Adams Co.).


Griffith, Helen. Dauntless in Mississippi: The Life of Sarah A. Dickey, 1838-1904. Hadley, Mass.: Dinosaur, 1965. xii, 173 pp.

Biography of the founder of Mount Hermon Seminary, a school for African American girls in Clinton (Hinds Co.).


Griffiths, John D.M. "A State of Servitude Worse than Slavery: The Politics of Penal Administration in Mississippi, 1865-1900." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 1 (Feb. 1993): 1-18.

Argues that while convict leasing was outlawed in the 1890 constitution, it continued in an even more profitable form until 1906.


Griffith, Lucille Blanche. "An Economic History of Amite County, Mississippi, 1820-1860." M.A. thesis, Tulane University, 1942. 74 l.

Includes chapters on early settlers, transportation and communication, slavery, agriculture, land ownership, and industry.


Griffith, Lucille. "Peter Chester and the End of the British Empire in West Florida." Alabama Review 30, no. 1 (Jan. 1977): 14-33.

Policies and practices of Chester (c. 1717-1799), last royal governor of British West Florida, 1770-81.


Griffith, Reuben William. "The Historical Origins of Tippah County." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1939. 116 l.

Includes county organization in 1836, government, geography, early settlers, economy, religion, and schools.


Grillis, Pamela Lea. Vicksburg and Warren County: A History of People and Place. Vicksburg, Miss.: Dancing Rabbit Books, 1992. 157 pp.

Local history.


Grim, Valerie. "Black Farm Families in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta: A Study of the Brooks Farm Community, 1920-1970." Ph.D. dissertation, Iowa State University, 1990. 422 l.

Social, economic, and cultural study of the Sunflower County plantation that was the only African American worker-owned farm community in the Delta in the 1940s.


Grimes, Betty M. "The Selection of Delegates: Mississippi's 1890 Constitutional Convention." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1976. v, 131 l.

Examines the selection of convention delegates in Hinds, Warren, Choctaw, Lee, Lafayette, Harrison, and Hancock counties.


Grimsley, Mark. "'We Will Vindicate the Right': An Account of the Life of Jefferson Davis." Civil War Times Illustrated 30, no. 3 (July/Aug. 1991): 30-76.

Brief biography.


Grindstaff, Carl Forest. "Migration and Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Massachusetts, 1970. 361 l.

Analyzes black and white in- and outmigration trends throughout the state's history.


Grisham, Vaughn. "Tupelo, Mississippi, from Settlement to Industrial Community, 1860-1970." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina, 1975. 463 l.

Historical and sociological study of the transition of Tupelo (Lee Co.) from "rural trade center" to "small industrial city."


Grossman, James R. Land of Hope: Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great Migration. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989. xiii, 384 pp.

Migration of African Americans, many of whom were from Mississippi, to Chicago; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "A Dream Deferred: Black Migration to Chicago, 1916-1921," University of California, Berkeley, 1982.


Grubbs, Kenneth R. "Selected Aspects in the Pattern of Economic Growth and Economic Development of the Mississippi Economy, 1817-1967." Southern Quarterly 6, no. 1 (Oct. 1967): 95-116.

Notes agricultural changes, including greater land use, more livestock, and the advent of soybean cultivation, but also a marked decrease in farm employment and a greater dependence on government disbursements.


Guelker, Alice Donnell. "The Senatorial Career of James Kimble Vardaman, 1913-1919." M.A. thesis, Vanderbilt University, 1956. 185 l.

Finds that Vardaman's ascendancy marked the beginning of the polarization of white Mississippi voters along regional and class lines; much of the thesis concerns Vardaman's views on World War I and his personal antipathy for President Woodrow Wilson.


Guess, Richard Malcolm. "Henry Hughes, Sociologist, 1829-1862." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1930. 73 l.

Biographical study of the Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.) native, an early sociologist and apologist for slavery.


Guice, John D.W. "A Trace of Violence?" Southern Quarterly 29, no. 4 (Summer 1991): 123-43.

Early nineteenth-century outlaws on the Natchez Trace: Joseph Thompson Hare, John Murrell Beard, "Little" Harpe, and Samuel Mason.


Gullette, Charles A. "The Career of Belle Kearney: A Study in Reform." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1967. iii, 58 l.

Biographical study of Kearney (1863-1939), temperance reformer and suffragist.


Gulley, Harold E. "Southern Nationalism on the Landscape: County Names in Former Confederate States." Names 38, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 231-42.

Observes that over thirty percent of Mississippi counties formed after 1861 have southern nationalist names, such as Jefferson Davis and Lamar.


Gunn, Jack W. "The Battle of Iuka." Journal of Mississippi History 24, no. 3 (July 1962): 142-57.

Details of the 1862 Tishomingo County battle.


Gunn, Jack Winton. A Christian Heritage: The History of the First Baptist Church, Grenada, Mississippi. Grenada, Miss.: Baptist, 1959. xi, 291 pp.

Institutional history of the Grenada County church, 1839-1959.


Gunn, Jack W. "Mississippi in 1860 as Reflected in the Activities of the Governor's Office." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 3 (July 1960): 179-91.

Nomination, election, and inauguration of Governor John J. Pettus, 1860.


Gunn, Jack Winton, and Gladys C. Castle. A Pictorial History of Delta State University. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1980. viii, 215 pp.

Genesis and history of the Cleveland (Bolivar Co.) institution, 1922-80, including many photographs; lists emeritus faculty, student officeholders, and honor graduates.


Gunn, Mark E. "The Magnolia Cross: The Role of Mississippi Chaplains During the Civil War." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1991. v, 144 l.

Covers Mississippians in the Confederate chaplaincy and religious revivals late in the war.


Guralnick, Peter. Last Train to Memphis: The Rise of Elvis Presley. Boston: Little, Brown, 1994. xiv, 560 pp.

First volume of a projected two-volume biography of rock'n' roll star Elvis Aaron Presley (1935-77) of Tupelo (Lee Co.); covers the early years of his career up to 1958.


Guthrie, Paul Daniel. "The Dixiecrat Movement of 1948." M.A. thesis, Bowling Green State University, 1955. 264 l.

Democratic Party split over the race issue; Mississippi governor Fielding Wright was the vice presidential candidate on the States' Rights ("Dixiecrat") ticket.


Gutierrez, C. Paige. The Cultural Legacy of Biloxi's Seafood Industry. [Biloxi, Miss.]: n. p., 1984. 52 pp.

Anthropological field report with newspaper article reprints.


Gutman, Bill. Football Superstars of the '70s. N.Y.: Julian Messner, 1975. 191 pp.

Includes chapter on Archie Manning (b. 1949) of Drew (Sunflower Co.), who played for the University of Mississippi and the New Orleans Saints.


Guyton, Annie D. Love, at al. One Hundred Years of the First Baptist Church, Kosciusko, Mississippi: Centennial Celebration, 1848-1948. Kosciusko, Miss.: Star-Herald, [1948?]. 32 pp.

History of the Attala County church.


Guyton, David E. Mother Berry of Blue Mountain. Nashville, Tenn.: Broadman, 1942. 115 pp.

Life of Blue Mountain College (Tippah Co.) administrator Modena Lowrey Berry (1850-1942), daughter of Mark Perrin Lowrey, founder of the college.


Guyton, Pearl Vivian. Campaign and Siege of Vicksburg. Natchez, Miss.: the author, 1945. 32 pp.

Brief popular account of the struggle for control of the Warren County port on the Mississippi River, 1862-63.


Guyton, Pearl Vivian. Our Mississippi. Austin, Tex.: Steck, 1953. xi, 467 pp.

Secondary school textbook.


Guyton, Pearl Vivian. The Story of Rosalie. Jackson, Miss.: the author, 1941. 50 pp.

History of the 1800-23 Natchez (Adams Co.) mansion and its furnishings; built near the site of Fort Rosalie, the mansion serves as the state shrine of the Daughters of the American Revolution.


Guyton, Pearl Vivian. The Story of Connelly's Tavern on Ellicott Hill, a National Shrine. Jackson, Miss.: the author, 1942. 48 pp.

History, including floorplans, of the 1798 tavern built on the site of Andrew Ellicott's 1796 survey camp in Natchez (Adams Co.).


Gwin, Stanford P. "Argument for the League of Nations: John Sharp Williams in the Senate, 1918-1920. Southern Speech Journal 31, no. 3 (Spring 1966): 226-44.

Criticizes Williams's Senate speeches in support of the League on the grounds that they hewed too closely to President Woodrow Wilson's inflexible posture; based on the author's master's thesis, "An Analysis of the Speaking of John Sharp Williams during the League of Nations Controversy in the Senate, 1918-1920," University of Southern Mississippi, 1963.


Haarman, Albert W. "The Spanish Conquest of British West Florida, 1779-1781." Florida Historical Quarterly 39, no. 2 (Oct. 1960): 107-34.

Account of the campaign under Don Bernardo de Galvez.


Hadskey, John William. "A History of Franklin County, Mississippi, to 1865." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1954. 268 l.

Covers eighteenth-century land grants, county organization in 1809, plantation economy, social life, and anti-Union sentiment.


Haight, William R., and Zed H. Burns, comps. "Confederate Generals." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 3 (Aug. 1977): 227-38; 39, no. 4 (Nov. 1977): 363-75; 40, no. 1 (Feb. 1978): 61-72 .

Three-part article reveals names, birth and death information, peacetime occupations, and burial locations of 425 Confederate generals.


Halbert, H.S. "Bernard Romans' Map of 1771." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 415-39.

Examination of an early map of the Tombigbee River region; focuses on the naming and location of many Choctaw settlements.


Halbert, H.S. "Choctaw Indians Names in Alabama and Mississippi." Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society 3 (1898-99): 64-77.

Selected gazetteer.


Halbert, H.S. "The Choctaw Creation Legend." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 267-70).

Creation legend of Nanih Waiya as related by Isaac Pistonatubbee (c. 1820- c. 1900).


Halbert, H.S. "The French Trading Post and the Chocchuma Village in East Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 325-29.

Speculates that a structure in Plymouth (Lowndes Co.) that was demolished in 1860 may have been a trading post established by Pierre le Moyne, Sieur d'Iberville (1661-1706) in the early eighteenth century.


Halbert, H.S. "Funeral Customs of the Mississippi Choctaws." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 353-66.

Changing customs in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.


Halbert, H.S. "The Last Indian Council on Noxubee River." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 271-80.

Meeting at Council Bluff (Oktibbeha Co.), 1831, at which Choctaw agent William Ward violated the terms of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek by disallowing registration of Choctaws who wished to remain in Mississippi.


Halbert, H.S. "Nanih Waiya, the Sacred Mound of the Choctaws." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 223-34.

Location, description, and history of the Winston County mound that is considered by the Choctaws to be the site of the creation of their people.


Halbert, H.S. "Origin of Mashulaville." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 389-97.

Noxubee County village that grew up around the home of Choctaw chief Moshulitubbee in the early nineteenth century.


Halbert, H.S., and A.J. Brown. "Published Accounts of Prehistoric Remains." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 5 (1902): 297-301.

Writings published prior to 1902 dealing with Indian mounds, earthworks, walls, and ornaments.


Halbert, H.S. "Shatala: Notes on a Chickasaw Town Name." Mississippi Valley Historical Association Proceedings 8 (1914-15): 93-94.

Brief note on the meaning of the name Shatala: "post-oak grove."


Halbert, H.S. "The Small Indian Tribes of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 5 (1902): 302-308.

Brief mentions of the Biloxi, Pascagoula, Chozetta, Moctoby, Chato, Chocchuma, Tunica, Yazoo, Ofogoula, Coroa, Tapoucha, and Ibetoupa tribes.


Halbert, H.S. "Some Inaccuracies in Claiborne's History in Regard to Tecumseh." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1, no. 1 (June 1898): 101-103.

Argues that J.F.H. Claiborne's Mississippi (1880) includes fictitious details about the visit of the Shawnee chief Tecumseh to the Choctaws.


Halbert, H.S. "The Story of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 373-402.

Negotiations preceding the signing of the 1830 treaty by which the Choctaws agreed to cede their lands in Mississippi to the federal government.


Hall, James. A Brief History of the Mississippi Territory, to Which is Prefixed a Summary View of the Country Between the Settlements on Cumberland River and the Territory. Salisbury, N.C.: F. Coupee, 1801. 70 pp.

Early history covers founding, geography, 1728 massacre, population, customs, commerce, and hurricanes.


Hall, L. Marshall. "William Sharkey and Reconstruction, 1866-1873." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 1 (Feb. 1965): 1-17.

Provisional governor in 1865, Sharkey was an opponent of the Fourteenth Amendment and military Reconstruction.


Hall, Martha Lacy, comp. An Historical Sketch of Magnolia, Mississippi: Centennial Celebration, Magnolia, Mississippi, 1856-1956. Magnolia, Miss.: W.M. Lacy, 1956. 120 pp.

Emphasizes family histories.


Hall, Robert Green. "The Natchez Trace." M.A. thesis, University of Wisconsin, 1914. 59+l.

Covers early trade, the trace's role as a federal road and in the transportation system of the larger region, and late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century life along the trace.


Halliburton, R., Jr. "Mississippi's Contribution to the Anti-Evolution Movement." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 2 (May 1973): 175-82.

Passage of the state's 1926 anti-evolution statute, which remained unchallenged until the Mississippi Supreme Court struck it down in Smith v. Mississippi (1970).


Halsell, Willie D. "The Appointment of L.Q.C. Lamar to the Supreme Court." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 28, no. 3 (Dec. 1941): 399-412.

Controversy in the press, in private correspondence, and in Congress over the nomination of Lamar, the first ex-Confederate to be appointed to the Court, 1887-88.


Halsell, Willie D. "The Bourbon Period in Mississippi Politics, 1875-1890." Journal of Southern History 11, no. 4 (Nov. 1945): 519-37.

Examines motivations of leading Mississippi Bourbons-L.Q.C. Lamar, Edward C. Walthall, James Z. George-for uniting the state's Democrats.


Halsell, Willie D. "A Country Merchant's Stock of Goods in 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 1 (Jan. 1950): 46-48.

Inventory of Abraham Barnett's store in Garvin's Landing (Sunflower Co.).


Halsell, Willie D. "Democratic Dissensions in Mississippi, 1870-1882." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 3 (July 1940): 123-35.

Conflicts between the L.Q.C. Lamar and Ethelbert Barksdale factions in senatorial and gubernatorial contests.


Halsell, Willie D. "The Friendship of L.Q.C. Lamar and Jefferson Davis." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 3 (July 1944): 131-44.

Three decades (1850s-80s) of the relationship.


Halsell, Willie D. "James R. Chalmers and 'Mahoneism' in Mississippi." Journal of Southern History 10, no. 1 (Feb. 1944): 37-58.

Attempt to defeat the Democrats in Mississippi by adopting the political strategy associated with Virginia senator William Mahone, who forged the Readjuster Party alliance across race and class lines in his state, 1879-82.


Halsell, Willie D. "L.Q.C. Lamar, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 2 (Apr. 1943): 59-78.

Focuses on several of Lamar's opinions, 1888-93.


Halsell, Willie D. "L.Q.C. Lamar's Taylor Farm: An Experiment in Diversified Farming." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 4 (Oct. 1943): 185-96.

Lamar tried crop rotation on his Lafayette County farm, 1885-88.


Halsell, Willie D. "Migration into, and Settlement of, Leflore County, 1833-1876." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 4 (Oct. 1947): 219-37.

First of two-part article; utilizes no census data.


Halsell, Willie D. "Migration into, and Settlement of, Leflore County in the Later Periods, 1876-1920." Journal of Mississippi History 10, no. 3 (July 1948): 240-60.' Continues article of October 1947.


Halsell, Willie D. "A Mississippi Habeas Corpus Case and Justice L.Q.C. Lamar." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 1 (Jan. 1942): 31-33.

Lamar's 1891 dismissal of a petition for habeas corpus in Walker v. Lea.


Halsell, Willie D. "Note on a Phase of L.Q.C. Lamar's Career." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 1 (Jan. 1947): 21-29.

Identifies Lamar's 1874 eulogy of Charles Sumner as the source of his reputation as a conciliator.


Halsell, Willie D. "Prelude to a Career: L.Q.C. Lamar Tries Politics." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 2 (Apr. 1945): 75-90.

Focuses on Lamar's early years in Oxford (Lafayette Co.), 1849-52, and his return to Georgia and his election to the Georgia legislature in 1853.


Halsell, Willie D. "Protection of Game in Sunflower County One Hundred Years Ago." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 2 (Apr. 1951): 105-107.

The county's first game law, enacted in 1856, protected deer and turkeys.


Halsell, Willie D. "Sunflower's First Two County Seats." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 4 (Oct. 1950): 225-30.

The towns of Clayton and McNutt served as county seats from 1844 until the 1871 creation of Leflore County from portions of Sunflower and Carroll counties.


Halsell, Willie D. "A Vicksburg Speculator and Planter in the Yazoo Delta." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 4 (Oct. 1949): 231-42.

James C. Chewning, owner of nearly seven thousand acres in Warren County at the height of his prosperity in 1839, settled in Sunflower County following financial losses later that year.


Haman, T.L. "Beginnings of Presbyterianism in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 203-21.

Chronology includes activities of early nineteenth-century ministers and missionaries and establishment of churches in Jefferson, Claiborne, Adams, and Amite counties, 1804-17.


Hamblin, Robert W. "The 1965 Southern Literary Festival: A Microcosm of the Civil Rights Movement." Journal of Mississippi History 53, no. 2 (May 1991): 83-114.

Plans for the Oxford (Lafayette Co.) meeting, the first in the history of the festival to include African American delegates.


Hamil, Linda Virginia. "A Study of Theatrical Activity in Natchez, Mississippi, from 1800-1840." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1976. iii, 88 l.

Plays presented in Natchez (Adams Co.) by traveling theater companies.


Hamilton, Alfred P. Galloway Memorial Methodist Church, 1836-1956: A History Compiled from Very Scanty Records of Private Individuals, Archives from the Methodist Room, Millsaps College, General Minutes of the Woman's Society of Christian Service, and of the Official Board of Our Church. [Jackson, Miss.]: Galloway Memorial Methodist Church, 1956. 240 pp.

Detailed institutional history.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "Confederate Companies from Monroe County." Journal of Monroe County History 7 (1981): 12-14.

Brief listing.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "Fighting with Forrest." Journal of Monroe County History 7 (1981): 45-49.

Brief narrative of General Nathan Bedford Forrest's Civil War exploits in Mississippi and Tennessee.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "Historic Monroe: An Introduction." Journal of Monroe County History 1 (1974-1975): 3-11.

Brief historical overview of the first northern Mississippi county.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. Mississippi, Mirror of the 1920s. Aberdeen, Miss.: Gregg-Hamilton, 1979. 74 pp.

State politics and personalities in the 1920s.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "Monroe County Churches to 1876." Journal of Monroe County History 3 (1977): 40-48.

Includes list of churches and their founding dates and locations.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "Monroe County Legislators." Journal of Monroe County History 7 (1981): 55-57.

Lists state senators and representatives, 1822-1980.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "New Monroe County Churches, 1877 On." Journal of Monroe County History 8 (1982): 36-44.

Includes locations and founding dates of white and black churches.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. Progressive Mississippi. Aberdeen, Miss.: the author, 1978. 185 pp.

Rise and fall of a variety of progressivism that reflected Mississippi's agrarianism and racial tensions; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Mississippi Politics in the Progressive Era, 1904-1920," Vanderbilt University, 1958.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "The Turning Point: The Legislative Session of 1908." Journal of Mississippi History 25, no. 2 (Apr. 1963): 93-111.

Characterizes the 1908 legislative session as one of the most progressive in the state's history.


Hamilton, Charles Granville. "The Wren Schools." Journal of Monroe County History 5 (1979): 51-60.

White and black schools in the Wren District, 1820-1957.


Hamilton, Granville. "Literary Monroe." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 1 (Jan. 1940): 38-41.

Minor nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers from Monroe County.


Hamilton, Holman. The Three Kentucky Presidents: Lincoln, Taylor, Davis. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1978. xvi, 70 pp.

Undocumented biographical sketches, including one of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States of America, who was born in Kentucky.


Hamilton, J.G. de Roulhac. "Lamar of Mississippi." Virginia Quarterly Review 8, no. 1 (Jan. 1932): 77-89.

L.Q.C. Lamar's eulogy of Charles Sumner on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, 1874, and Lamar's tenure as secretary of the interior and U.S. Supreme Court justice.


Hamilton, Kenneth Marvin. Black Towns and Profit: Promotion and Development in the Trans-Appalachian West, 1877-1915. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1991. xii, 185 pp.

Includes chapter on Mound Bayou (Bolivar Co.), the all-black town founded in 1887.


Hamilton, Peter J., Thomas M. Owen, Franklin L. Riley, and James M. White. "An Account of Manuscripts, Papers, and Documents Pertaining to Mississippi in Public Repositories beyond the State." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 5 (1902): 51-117.

Papers in state, federal, and overseas archives, libraries, and other institutions.


Hamilton, Peter J. "British West Florida." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 399-426.

Brief diplomatic history, 1763-79.


Hamilton, Peter Joseph. The Chavalier d'Iberville: Some Considerations of the Life of a Great Pioneer. Mobile, Ala.: Historic Mobile Preservation Society, 1948. xi, 32 pp.

Life of Pierre Le Moyne, Sieur d'Iberville (1661-1706); reprinted from the Mobile Register (1902), the text was Hamilton's presidential address to the Iberville Historical Society.


Hamilton, Peter J. "Running Mississippi's South Line." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 157-68.

Andrew Ellicott's survey of the boundary between Spanish and American territory at the thirty-first parallel, 1797-99.


Hamilton, Peter J. "The Yowanne, or Hiowanni, Indians." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 403-10.

Describes the Choctaw group that lived in what is now Wayne and Clarke counties near Shubuta.


Hamilton, W.B. "Early Cotton Regulation in the Lower Mississippi Valley." Agricultural History 15, no. 1 (Jan. 1941): 20-25.

Short-lived effort to enforce cotton inspection legislation, 1803-1804, in the Natchez District and in the East Central Mississippi black belt.


Hamilton, W.B. "Mississippi 1817: A Sociological and Economic Analysis." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 270-92.

Examines demographics, the profitability of slavery, and the search for a staple crop.


Hamilton, William B., Jr. "American Beginnings in the Old Southwest: The Mississippi Phase." Ph.D. dissertation, Duke University, 1937. 622 l.

Covers geography of the Mississippi Territory, settlement, economy, the transition from Spanish to American authority, and Democratic factionalism under governors Winthrop Sargent and W.C.C. Claiborne from 1790 to 1815; printed in 1994 by the Mobile Genealogical Society.


Hamilton, William Baskerville. Anglo-American Law in the Frontier: Thomas Rodney and His Territorial Cases." Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1953. x, 498 pp.

Combines biography of Judge Rodney (1744-1811) with description of the law that Rodney helped to establish in the region; biographical section was also published separately as Thomas Rodney: Revolutionary and Builder of the West (Duke University Press, 1953).


Hamilton, William B., and Ruth K. Nuermberger. "An Appraisal of J.F.H. Claiborne, with His Annotated 'Memoranda' [1829-1840]." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 3 (July 1945): 131-55.

Sketch of Claiborne concludes that he was more important as a collector than as a historian; footnotes to his "Memoranda" identify over one hundred persons mentioned in the text.


Hamilton, William Baskerville. "Holly Springs, Mississippi, to the Year 1878." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1931. ii, 268, ix l.

Covers founding of the Marshall County town, antebellum prosperity, homes, the railroad, education, newspapers, residents who served in the Civil War, and the yellow fever epidemic of 1878; also includes biographical sketches.


Hamilton, William B. "Jefferson College and Education in Mississippi, 1798-1817." Journal of Mississippi History 3, no. 4 (Oct. 1941): 259-76.

History of the school, located near Natchez (Adams Co.).


Hamilton, William B. "The Planters Society in Claiborne County: The First Incorporated Cooperative and the First Farmers' Purchasing Cooperative." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 1 (Jan. 1949): 67-70.

Early cooperative (1809).


Hamilton, William B. "Politics in the Mississippi Territory." Huntington Library Quarterly 11, no. 3 (May 1948): 277-91.

Formation of political factions after 1798.


Hamilton, William B. "The Sources of History of the Mississippi Territory." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1939): 29-36.

Overview of published and unpublished sources, including official papers, private manuscripts, and newspapers.


Hamilton, William B. "The Southwestern Frontier, 1795-1817: An Essay in Social History." Journal of Southern History 10, no. 4 (Nov. 1944): 389-403.

Analyzes the social and economic structure of the Natchez District.


Hamilton, William B. "The Theater in the Old Southwest: The First Decade at Natchez." American Literature 12, no. 4 (Jan. 1941): 471-85.

Plays produced by the Natchez Theatrical Association, 1808-17.


Hamilton, William B., and William D. McCain, eds. "Wealth in the Natchez Region: Inventories of the Estate of Charles Percy, 1794 and 1804." Journal of Mississippi History 10, no. 4 (Oct. 1948): 290-316.

Mostly genealogy of the Percy family; inventories include lists and values of slaves.


Hamlet, Janice D. "Fannie Lou Hamer: The Unquenchable Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement." Journal of Black Studies 26, no. 5 (May 1996): 560-76.

Role of Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer (1917-77) of Ruleville (Sunflower Co.).


Hammond, E.L., Kenneth Redman, and J.G. Wickstrom, Jr. "Drug and Medical Advertising in Woodville, Mississippi, 1823-1843." Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association 9, no. 3 (Mar. 1948): 160-65.

Describes illnesses, remedies, and the status of pharmacology.


Hammons, Annie Ray. "A History of Dairying in Oktibbeha County." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1948. 75 l.

The work of W.B. Montgomery (1829-1904) and J.S. Moore in promoting diary farming.


Hammons, Ann. Wild Bill Sullivan: King of the Hollow. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1980. viii, 144 pp.

A descendant of William Cicero Sullivan (1851-1932) examines the legend of the violent Sullivan family of Smith County.


Hammons, Bill. "The 'Big House' on the Old Slade Homestead." Mississippi Folklore Register 21, nos. 1&2 (Spring/Fall 1987): 56-59.

Design, setting, materials, and use of the 1863 Absalom Slade cabin in Okahola (Lamar Co.).


Hamrick, William Lee. The Mississippi Conference of the Methodist Protestant Church: An Account of the Methodist Protestant Church at Work in the Territory of the Mississippi Conference During All the Years 1829 to 1939. Jackson, Miss.: Hawkins Foundation, 1957. 336 pp.

Includes some biographical information on conference members.


Hanchett, William. "Reconstruction and the Rehabilitation of Jefferson Davis: Charles G. Halpine's Prison Life." Journal of American History 56, no. 2 (Sept. 1969): 280-89.

Demonstrates that Davis repudiated the account of his imprisonment at Fort Monroe, Virginia, as largely fictitious.


Handford, Charlene Jeanette. "Bishop Charles Galloway's Rhetoric, 1903-1908." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 3 (Aug. 1982): 217-25.

Speeches in support of African American rights by Methodist bishop Galloway, who was a major ideological opponent of white supremacist governor James K. Vardaman.


Hankinson, Alan. Vicksburg 1863: Grant Clears the Mississippi. London: Osprey, 1993. Osprey Military Campaign series, no. 26. 96 pp.

Heavily illustrated brief account of the conflict.


Hanna, A.J. Flight into Oblivion. N.p.: Johnson, 1938. xiii, 306 pp.

Flight of Confederate president Jefferson Davis and his cabinet after the fall of Richmond in 1865.


Hansen, Vagn K. "Jefferson Davis and the Repudiation of Mississippi Bonds: The Development of a Political Myth." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 2 (May 1971): 105-32.

Argues that an article written by Davis in 1849 defending the state's 1842 repudiation of Union and Planters Bank bonds was misinterpreted by English bondholders and may have been the source of the enduring myth of Davis's personal involvement in the repudiation.


Hardeman, Martin J. "Frontier and Community: Pike County, Mississippi, 1815-1861." Journal of Mississippi History 59, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 339-54.

Establishment, settlers, politics, slaves, railroad development, secession, and founding of the towns of Holmesville and Osyka.


Harder, Kelsie B. "Dancing Rabbit and Gandsi: Some Place-Naming Actions in Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 13, 2 (Fall 1979): 66-78.

Origins of more than twenty-five geographical names.


Hardin, Paul D. "The Early Life of Edward Cary Walthall." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 1 (Jan. 1944): 30-38.

Sketch of U.S. senator Walthall (1831-98) of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.); based on the author's master's thesis, "Edward Cary Walthall: A Mississippi Conservative," Duke University, 1940.


Harding, Lee Emling. "'A Strategy for Living': Selected Autobiographical Writing by Nineteenth-Century Mississippi Women, with Representative Transcriptions and Checklist of Sources." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1983. 261 l.

Ten samples from the holdings of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History; includes transcriptions from three journals and a checklist of manuscript writings by nineteenth-century Mississippi women.


Hardy, Gayle J. American Women Civil Rights Activists: Biobibliographies of 68 Leaders, 1825-1992. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 1993. xx, 479 pp.

Includes brief sketch of Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer (1917-77) of Ruleville (Sunflower Co.) and a bibliography of books, articles, films, recordings, and sketches about her.


Harmon, George Dewey. Sixty Years of Indian Affairs: Political, Economic, and Diplomatic, 1789-1850. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1941. vii, 428 pp.

Chapter seventeen, "Federal Financial and Economic Policy toward the Choctaws," covers the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, removal, dispensation of acquired Choctaw lands, and investigations by the Mississippi legislature and the U.S. Congress into Choctaw claims through the year 1846.


Harmon, Marion Franklin. A History of the Christian Churches (Disciples of Christ) in Mississippi. Aberdeen, Miss.: n.p., 1929. 213 pp.

History of the denomination in Mississippi from 1832 to 1929; includes information on individual congregations.


Harper, Andrew C. "The Civilian Conservation Corps and Mississippi: A New Deal Success Story." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1992. iv, 91 l.

Deals with administration and accomplishments of the CCC and the alleged racial discrimination practiced by the agency.


Harper, Ben I. "The Mississippi Conservatives, 1854-1875: The Search for a Party." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1980. viii, 73 l.

Evaluates the theory of "persistant Whiggery" in Mississippi and examines the identity of the Mississippi Scalawags.


Harper, Jean Cox, comp. Mississippi-Her People, Places and Legends. Jackson, Miss.: the author, 1977. 73 pp.

Historical origins of the names chosen for Mississippi chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution.


Harrell, G.L. "History of Millsaps College." Millsaps College Bulletin 26, no. 6 (Sept. 1943): 3-22.

History of the Jackson (Hinds Co.) college, 1888-1942; lists faculty, staff, trustees, and early degrees conferred.


Harrell, Laura D.S. "Colonial Medical Practice in British West Florida, 1763-1781." Bulletin of the History of Medicine 41, no. 6 (Nov./Dec. 1967): 539-58.

Diseases and the medicines and practices used to treat them.


Harrell, Laura D.S. "The Development of the Lyceum Movement in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 3 (Aug. 1969): 187-201.

Interest in learning by early settlers, establishment of library and literary societies, the lyceum movement (and list of lyceums, 1830-60), and the founding of academies, 1781-1843.


Harrell, Laura D.S. "His Own Vine and Fig Tree: A Nineteenth Century Botanist, John Carmichael Jenkins, M.D." Reminder [Miss.] 24, no. 1 (Aug. 1966).

Horticultural work of Jenkins (1809-55) of Elgin Plantation, near Natchez (Adams Co.).


Harrell, Laura D.S. "Horse Racing in the Old Natchez District, 1783-1830." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 3 (July 1951): 123-37.

Breeding, jockey clubs, racetracks, and races.


Harrell, Laura D.S., ed. "Imprints toward Statehood." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 429-42.

Congressional committee reports on the issue of statehood for the Mississippi Territory, 1810-17.


Harrell, Laura D.S. "Index to Minutes of the Orphans' (Probate) Court of Jefferson County, Mississippi, January 23, 1830-November 24, 1834 [part 1]." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 3 (Aug. 1971): 231-40.

Indexes names of those who appeared in court.


Harrell, Laura D.S. "Jockey Clubs and Race Tracks in Antebellum Mississippi, 1795-1861." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 4 (Nov. 1966): 304-18.

Survey of horse racing in antebellum Mississippi; appendix lists newspaper notices, secondary sources, and rules of the Mississippi Jockey Club.


Harrell, Laura D.S. "Preventative Medicine in the Mississippi Territory, 1799-1802." Bulletin of the History of Medicine 40, no. 4 (July/Aug. 1966): 364-75.

Smallpox epidemic averted in the Natchez District in 1802 through large-scale vaccination and patient isolation.


Harrell, Virginia Calohan. Vicksburg and the River. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1982. 112 pp.

Pictorial history of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) includes information about architecture, the river, the Civil War siege, and the Vicksburg National Military Park.


Harris, J. William. "Etiquette, Lynching, and Racial Boundaries in Southern History: A Mississippi Example." American Historical Review 100, no. 2 (Apr. 1995): 387-410.

Examines two instances of ritual vigilante punishment of African Americans in Vicksburg (Warren Co.)-the tarring and feathering of Dr. John Miller and the 1919 lynching of Lloyd Clay.


Harris, Johnny L. "A Historical Analysis of Educational, Economic, and Political Changes in Fayette, Mississippi, from 1954 to 1971." Ph.D. dissertation, Florida State University, 1972. 179 l.

Changes in Fayette (Jefferson Co.), the second town in the South since Reconstruction to elect an African American mayor.


Harris, William C. "The Creed of the Carpetbaggers: The Case of Mississippi." Journal of Southern History 40, no. 2 (May 1974): 199-224.

Characterizes northern Reconstruction politicians as mainly honest, capable, and committed to the republican ideals they believed that the Civil War was fought to uphold.


Harris, William C. The Day of the Carpetbagger: Republican Reconstruction in Mississippi. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1979. xvi, 760 pp.

Comprehensive revisionist account of "Radical Reconstruction" from 1867 to 1876.


Harris, William C. "Formulation of the First Mississippi Plan: The Black Code of 1865." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 3 (Aug. 1967): 181-201.

Political background of the first legislation to define the role of freedmen; argues that the severity of Mississippi's black code contributed directly to the imposition by Congress of "Radical Reconstruction."


Harris, William C. "Hiram Cassedy: A Former Southern Nationalist in Defense of the Negro in Mississippi Reconstruction." Louisiana Studies 7, no. 3 (Fall 1968): 252-58.

Anomalous case of Cassedy (b. 1822), a Franklin County secessionist Democrat who by 1866 had joined the Republican Party and supported political and legal rights for freedmen.


Harris, William C. "James Lynch: Black Leader in Southern Reconstruction." Historian 34, no. 1 (Nov. 1971): 40-61.

Characterizes Mississippi secretary of state Lynch (1838-72) as the ablest African American Reconstruction politician and the most impressive orator of his day.


Harris, William C. "A Mississippi Whig and the Ascension of Rutherford B. Hayes to the Presidency." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 3 (Aug. 1968): 202-205.

Whig lawyer Oscar J.E. Stuart wrote to Hayes in 1877 about the new president's inaugural address and the presence of carpetbaggers and scalawags in the South.


Harris, William C. Presidential Reconstruction in Mississippi. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1967. xiii, 279 pp.

Describes efforts of President Andrew Johnson to bring southern states back into the Union without retribution and identifies state leadership in the period 1865-67 as Whig rather than Democratic; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Presidential Reconstruction in Mississippi: Political and Economic Aspects," University of Alabama, 1965.


Harris, William C. "A Reconsideration of the Mississippi Scalawag." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 1 (Feb. 1970): 3-42.

Examines the motives of white Mississippians who became Republicans during Reconstruction.


Harrison, Alferdteen, ed. Black Exodus: The Great Migration from the American South. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1991. xviii, 187 pp.

Includes Neil McMillen's essay, "The Migration and Black Protest in Jim Crow Mississippi," which deals with African Americans who resisted post-World War I outmigration.


Harrison, Alferdteen. A History of the Most Worshipful Stringer Grand Lodge: Our Heritage Is Our Challenge. Jackson, Miss.: Most Worshipful Stringer Grand Lodge, Free _ and Accepted Masons of the State of Mississippi, Prince Hall Affiliate, 1977. xii, 228 pp.

Deals with African American Masonry in Mississippi, especially the Vicksburg (Warren Co.) lodge named for founder Thomas W. Stringer (1815-93).


Harrison, Alferdteen B. Piney Woods School: An Oral History. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1982. viii, 169 pp.

History of the Rankin County school for African American children founded in 1909 by Laurence C. Jones (1882-1975), who modeled the school after Booker T. Washington's industrial education institutes.


Harrison, R.W. Alluvial Empire: A Study of State and Local Efforts Toward Land Development in the Alluvial Valley of the Lower Mississippi River, Including Flood Control, Land Drainage, Land Clearing, Land Forming. N.p.: Delta Fund in cooperation with Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1961. xviii, 344 pp.

Land development in the alluvial valley of the lower Mississippi River since 1945; considers economic and social history of the region.


Harrison, Robert W. "Early Flood-Control Legislation in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley." Journal of Mississippi History 23, no. 2 (Apr. 1961): 104-26.

Reviews Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas laws establishing and funding levees, 1721-1850s.


Harrison, Robert W. "The Formative Years of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee District." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 4 (Oct. 1951): 236-48.

History of the flood control district that has served the upper Delta since 1884.


Harrison, Robert W. "Levee Building in Mississippi before the Civil War." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 3 (Apr. 1950): 63-97.

History of flood control efforts, 1819-61.


Harrison, Robert W. Levee Districts and Levee Building in Mississippi: A Study of State and Local Efforts to Control Mississippi River Floods. Stoneville, Miss.: Delta Council, 1951. ix, 254 pp.

Flood control programs and improvements in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta beginning in the early nineteenth century.


Hart, C.W.M. "A Reconsideration of Natchez Social Structure." American Anthropologist 45 (new series), no. 3, part 1 (July/Sept. 1943): 374-86.

Asserts the "biological impossibility" of John R. Swanton's explication of the Natchez Indian class structure.


Hartje, Robert. "The Gray Dragoon Wins His Final Victory." Tennessee Historical Quarterly 23, no. 1 (Mar. 1964): 38-58.

Expanding on the author's 1959 article in the same journal, gives a fuller portrait of Union commanders Rosecrans, Garfield, Gilbert, and Coburn.


Hartje, Robert. "Van Dorn Conducts a Raid on Holly Springs and Enters Tennessee." Tennessee Historical Quarterly 18, no. 2 (June 1959): 120-33.

Examines the 1862 cavalry raid that successfully destroyed the Union military supply base at Holly Springs (Marshall Co.); skirmishes at Davis's Mill also mentioned.


Hartje, Robert G. Van Dorn: The Life and Times of a Confederate General. Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt University Press, 1967. xiii, 359 pp.

Highlights the disappointing military career and murder of Van Dorn (1820-63); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Major General Earl Van Dorn," Vanderbilt University, 1955.


Hartley, William G. "Reconstruction Data from the 1870 Census: Hinds County, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 1 (Feb. 1973): 55-64.

Information--including wealth, age, birthplace, and occupation-on fifty-two officeholders.


Harwood, Thomas. "The Abolitionist Image of Louisiana and Mississippi." Louisiana History 7, no. 4 (Fall 1966): 281-308.

Image of slavery portrayed in abolitionist literature, such as Uncle Tom's Cabin, American Slavery As It Is, the Emancipator, the Liberator, and numerous other periodicals; suggests secondary literature that offers a "corrective."


Haskins, C.H. "Yazoo Land Companies." American Historical Association Papers 5, part 4 (1891): 395-437.

Conflicting claims to land in what is now Mississippi and Alabama by speculators in Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, and New England; discusses Fletcher v. Peck (1810), the U.S. Supreme Court decision that settled the Yazoo controversy.


Hassler, William W. "The Davis-Stephens Feud." Civil War Times Illustrated 3 (Apr. 1964): 43-49.

Reveals the depth of disagreement and personal animosity between the president and vice president of the Confederate States of America.


Hataway, Marsha Perry. "The Development of the Mississippi State Highway System, 1916-1932." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 4 (Nov. 1966): 286-303.

Beginning of the state highway system before the Great Depression forced a hiatus in the building program.


Hatcher, William H. "Some Mississippi Views on American Federalism, 1817-1900." Southern Quarterly 6, no. 1 (Oct. 1967): 117-41.

Argues that nineteenth-century Mississippi political ideology moved from an emphasis on nationalism early in the century to states' rights at mid-century to a middle position by late in the century; includes biographical sketches of political figures.


Hatfield, Joseph T. "Governor William Charles Cole Claiborne, Indians, and Outlaws in Frontier Mississippi, 1801-1803." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 4 (Nov. 1965): 323-50.

Claiborne's dual role as governor of the Mississippi Territory and superintendent of Indian affairs.


Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. Lafayette: University of Southwest Louisiana, 1976. U.S.L. History series, xiv, 393 pp.

Biography of William C.C. Claiborne (1775-1817), governor of the Mississippi Territory, governor of the Orleans Territory, and first governor of Louisiana; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Public Career of William C.C. Claiborne," Emory University, 1962.


Hathcock, Fairybelle Tubb. "New Hope Primitive Baptist Church." Journal of Monroe County History 2 (1976): 38-46.

Institutional history.


Hathorn, Billy Burton. "Challenging the Status Quo: Rubel Lex Phillips and the Mississippi Republican Party, 1963-1967." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 4 (Nov. 1985): 240-64.

Argues that Phillips's 1963 and 1967 gubernatorial campaigns were important in the post-World War II growth of the party.


Hathorn, Guy B. "Suffrage, Apportionment, and Elections in the Mississippi Constitutional Convention of 1890." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1942. 73 l.

Follows the effort of the convention to circumvent the Fifteenth Amendment and to guarantee white supremacy in state politics.


Hathorn, Hiram Percy. "Organization and Early History of Yalobusha County." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1933. 106 l.

Antebellum history of the county, including government, transportation, businesses, settlers, and towns.


Hathorn, J.C. A History of Grenada County. N.p., [1968?]. 229 pp [xvii].

Includes information on geography, early settlement, business and industry, banks, churches, utilities, accommodations, and the 1889 Cheatham-Tilgman trial.


Hathorn, John Cooper. "A Period Study of Lafayette County from 1836 to 1860 with Emphasis on Population Groups." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1938. 226 l.

White settlement, county organization, communities, slaveholding, land ownership, industries, schools, and churches.


Hathorn, Nathaniel Christopher. "A Financial History of the University of Mississippi from Its Endowment in 1819 to 1900." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1938. 160 l.

Argues that the state has mismanaged townships granted under the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.


Hattaway, Herman. "Confederate Myth Making: Top Command and the Chickasaw Bayou Campaign." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 4 (Nov. 1970): 311-26.

Leadership of Confederate General Stephen Dill Lee in his decisive defeat of Union General William T. Sherman's forces near Vicksburg, December 1862-January 1863.


Hattaway, Herman. General Stephen D. Lee. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1976. xi, 283 pp.

Biography of Confederate General Lee (1833-1908), first president of Mississippi A&M College (Mississippi State University), 1880-89; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Stephen Dill Lee: A Biography," Louisiana State University, 1969, and his master's thesis, "Stephen D. Lee in the Civil War," Louisiana State University, 1962.


Hattaway, Herman. "Stephen Dill Lee-A Profile." Civil War Times Illustrated 8, no. 5 (Aug. 1969): 17-25.

Military exploits of second-echelon Confederate general Lee (1833-1908) of Columbus (Lowndes Co.), who served in the battles of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) and Nashville and was cavalry commander for the state of Mississippi.


Haug, C. James. The Mechanical Feature: One Hundred Years of Engineering at Mississippi State University. Jackson: University of Mississippi for the Mississippi State College of Engineering, 1992. xii, 160 pp.

Institutional history.


Havard, William C., ed. The Changing Politics of the South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1972. xxv, 755 pp.

Includes "Mississippi: Unreconstructed and Unredeemed," by Charles N. Fortenberry and F. Glenn Abney, which assigns to race and rurality defining roles in the state's history.


Hawes, Ruth B. "Slavery in Mississippi." Sewanee Review 21, no. 2 (Apr. 1913): 223-34.

Uses a selection of published sources to argue that while slavery was indefensible as a system, it was often benevolent in practice.


Hawkins, Henry Gabriel. "History of Port Gibson, Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 279-99.

Covers early settlers, government, origin of the town's name, newspapers, buildings, the Battle of Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), prominent citizens, and nearby colleges and academies.


Hawkins, Henry G. Methodism in Natchez Including "A Centennial Retrospect of Methodism in Natchez, Miss., from 1799 to 1884," by W.C. Black. Jackson, Miss.: Hawkins Foundation, Mississippi Annual Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1937. 222 pp.

Detailed narrative history includes list of pastors assigned to the Adams County town.


Hawks, Joanne V. "Julia A. Nutt of Longwood." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 4 (Nov. 1994): 291-308.

Troubled life of the original owner of Longwood, the unfinished octagonal mansion in Natchez (Adams Co.); based largely on correspondence between widow Julia Augusta Williams Nutt (1822-97) and her son Sargeant Prentiss Nutt (b. 1855).


Hawks, Joanne Varner. "Like Mother, Like Daughter: Nellie Nugent Somerville and Lucy Somerville Howorth." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 2 (May 1983): 116-23.

Political activities, late nineteenth century to mid-twentieth century, of suffragist, legislator, and temperance advocate Somerville and lawyer and legislator Howorth of Greenville (Washington Co.).


Hawks, Joanne V. "Nancy McDougall Robinson (1808-1873): A Personal Story, a Shared Experience." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 1 (Feb. 1993): 19-30.

Reviews content of the diaries (1832-73) of Robinson of Holmes County.


Hawks, Joanne Varner. "Social Reform in the Cotton Kingdom, 1830-1860." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1970. 272 l.

Temperence, penal reform, and the public school movement in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and South Carolina.


Hawks, Joanne V., M. Carolyn Ellis, and J. Byron Morris. "Women in the Mississippi Legislature (1924-1981)." Journal of Mississippi History 43, no. 4 (Nov. 1981): 266-93.

Collective biography of forty-four women legislators includes information about their political affiliation, education, religion, and the legislation they supported.


Hawley, Steve C. "Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade at Fredericksburg." Civil War History 40, no. 1 (Mar. 1994): 5-24.

Experience of former congressman Barksdale (1821-63) of Columbus (Lowndes Co.) as commander of "Barksdale's Brigade," Army of Northern Virginia; based on the author's master's thesis, "Brigidier General William Barksdale, C.S.A.: A Study in the Generalship of a Volunteer Officer," Texas A&M University, 1992.


Hay, Fred J. "The Sacred/Profane Dialectic in Delta Blues: The Life and Lyrics of Sonny Boy Williamson." Phylon 48, no. 4 (Winter 1987): 317-26.

Includes brief account of the history of Delta blues music and of the early life of Willie (or Aleck) "Rice" Miller (1899-1965), who used the stage name "Sonny Boy Williamson (II)."


Hayden, Julius John, Jr. "The History of Pass Christian, Mississippi, 1699-1900." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1950. 150 l.

Founding and settlement of the coastal resort community.


Haydon, F. Stansbury. "Grant's Wooden Mortars and Some Incidents of the Siege of Vicksburg." Journal of the American Military Institute 4 (Spring 1940): 30-38.

Near the end of the 1863 siege of Vicksburg (Warren Co.), ingenious Union engineers fashioned mortars out of large logs.


Haynes, Robert V. "The Disposal of Lands in the Mississippi Territory." Journal of Mississippi History 24, no. 4 (Oct. 1962): 226-52.

Conflicting land claims in the territorial period, 1798-1817.


Haynes, Robert V. "Historians and the Mississippi Territory." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 409-28.

Historiographical essay on the territorial period, 1798-1817.


Haynes, Robert V. "James Willing and the Planters of Natchez: The American Revolution Comes to the Southwest." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 1 (Feb. 1975): 1-40.

Relates the story of Willing's Expedition of 1778, an unsuccessful attempt sanctioned by the Continental Congress to open the Mississippi River to American trade and to capture British West Florida.


Haynes, Robert V. "Law Enforcement in Frontier Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 1 (Jan. 1960): 27-42.

Mentions several violent episodes and the legislative and judicial efforts to create a law-abiding society, 1795-1817.


Haynes, Robert V. "Life on the Mississippi Frontier: Case of Matthew Phelps." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 1 (Feb. 1977): 1-15.

Tragic life of an early Natchez settler, 1770s.


Haynes, Robert V. The Natchez District and the American Revolution. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1976. viii, 191 pp.

Events in the southern part of Mississippi when it was part of British West Florida, 1763-83, and in the Natchez District during the Revolutionary War; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "A Political History of the Mississippi Territory," Rice Institute, 1958, which also continues the story through 1817.


Haynes, Robert V. "The Revolution of 1800 in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 4 (Oct. 1957): 234-51.

In the election for the first territorial House of Representatives, the success of the Democratic Green-West faction signaled a victory of the yeomanry over the merchant-professional class in Natchez.


Hazel, Joseph Allen. "The Geography of Negro Agricultural Slavery in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi, circa 1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1963. vii, 289 l.

Slavery as it related to the environment, agriculture, and transportation.


Headley, Katy McCaleb, comp. Claiborne County, Mississippi: The Promised Land. Port Gibson, Miss.: Port Gibson-Claiborne County Historical Society, 1976. ix, 542 pp.

Includes information on settlers, accommodations, entertainment, travel, outlaws, religion, yellow fever, schools, organizations, medicine, slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, courts, cemeteries, and writers.


Hear, Victor. "Colonel William C. Falkner in the Civil War." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 1 (Feb. 1965): 42-62.

William Faulkner's great-grandfather, the prototype for Faulkner's character Colonel John Sartoris.


Heard, Jerrard C. "WLBT-TV Channel 3, Jackson, Mississippi: Meeting Community Needs and Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements: A Case Study." M.A. thesis, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, 1991. vi, 62 l.

Concludes that the station, the nation's first to have its license revoked on the basis of racial discrimination, was, by 1991, "in full compliance" with EEOC regulations.


Hearn, Carey. "Fire Control in Antebellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 4 (Nov. 1978): 319-27.

Fire protection in Natchez (Adams Co.), Columbus (Lowndes Co.), Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), Raymond (Hinds Co.), Woodville (Wilkinson Co.), and other communities.


Hearn, Walter Carey. "Towns in Antebellum Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1969. 221 l.

Includes information on social life, status of free Negroes, fire protection, education, religion, industry, entertainment, and social reform in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Columbus (Lowndes Co.), Jackson and Clinton (Hinds Co.), Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), Rodney (Jefferson Co.), Port Gibson and Grand Gulf (Claiborne Co.), Natchez (Adams Co.), Woodville (Wilkinson Co.), Grenada (Grenada Co.), and other communities.


Hearon, Cleo. "Mississippi and the Compromise of 1850." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 14 (1914): 7-229.

Full text of the author's Ph.D. dissertation (University of Chicago, 1913) traces the antipathy to measures-such as the Wilmot Proviso and the California admission bill--respecting the extension of slavery into newly acquired lands and gauges the growing sentiment for secession following the Compromise of 1850.


Hearon, Cleo. "Nullification in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (Jan. 1912): 37-71.

Shows how tariff opposition led to the formation in 1834 of the States' Rights Party.


Hearts the Lord Opened: The History of the Mississippi Woman's Missionary Union. Jackson: Woman's Missionary Union of Mississippi, 1954. 127 pp.

History of the Baptist women's organization, 1822-1954.


Heath, Robert M. "Replication Experiments for the Manufacture of Sixteenth-Century Spanish Bells." Mississippi Archaeology 26, no. 1 (June 1991): 39-55.

Suggests method of manufacture of the "Clarksdale bells" found in Coahoma County and believed to be of early Spanish origin.


Heflin, James Lionel. "A Rhetorical Analysis of the 1963 Mississippi Gubernatorial Campaign." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1965. 202 l.

Bulky appendices reprint speeches of Rubel Phillips and Paul B. Johnson.


Heflin, Robert Frank. "The Siege of Corinth." M.A. thesis, Vanderbilt University, 1956. 335 l.

Describes military strategy and strategic importance of the 1862 battle.


Heggie, Henry Watterson. Indians and Pioneers of Old Eliot, a Grenada County, Mississippi, Community. Grenada, Miss.: Tuscahoma, 1989. xi, 307 pp.

History of the western part of the county emphasizes the activities of the Eliot Mission, which closed after Choctaw removal in the 1830s; includes family histories of early settlers.


Heidelberg, Nell Angela. "The Frontier in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1940. [ix], 185 l.

Geography and cultural characteristics of five frontier areas: the Natchez District, the Piney Woods, the Upper Tombigbee, the Second Choctaw Cession, and the Choctaw Cession of 1832.


Heier, Jan Richard. "A Quantitative Study of Accounting Methods and Usage in Mid-Nineteenth Century Alabama and Mississippi." D.B.A. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1986. 193 l.

Finds that cotton planters commonly used Thomas Affleck's Cotton Plantation Record and Account Book to keep their financial records, while merchants often used accounting methods similar to their northern counterparts.


Heinze, Dykstra J. Bedford Forrest and the Airland Battle. Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University, 1986. v, 59 pp.

Includes analysis of Confederate general Forrest's strategies at the battles of Okolona (Chickasaw Co.) and Brice's Cross Roads (Prentiss/Lee counties) in 1864.


Heiss, Estelle Tucker Buchanan. "The Life of William Feimster Tucker." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1972. iii, 44 l.

Tucker (1827-81) of Chickasaw County was a probate judge, Confederate army office, and legislator.


Helms, James Marvin, Jr. "Land Tenure in Territorial Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Virginia, 1955. 196 l.

Describes a troublesome land system characterized by conflicting claims; assesses the roles of Albert Gallatin and President Thomas Jefferson in attempting to impose order.


Helms, John Douglas. "Just Lookin' for a Home: The Cotton Boll Weevil and the South." Ph.D. dissertation, Florida State University, 1977. 417 l.

Includes discussion of African American migration to the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta to avoid acreage reduction imposed in other areas in the 1910s and of the northern exodus of Mississippi African Americans during World War I and the early 1920s following devastating boll weevil infestation.


Hemleben, Sylvester John, and Richard T. Bennett. "Beginnings of the Legal Profession in Mississippi." Mississippi Law Journal 36, no. 2 (Mar. 1965): 155-69.

Training, qualifications, and political participation of lawyers before 1830; bulk of the article comprised of brief mentions of thirty lawyers, including Harry Toulmin, Lyman Harding, George Poindexter, Edward Turner, Powhatan Ellis, Richard Stockton, and Robert J. Walker.


Hemleben, Sylvester John, and Richard T. Bennett. "A Historical Sketch of the Early Law School of the University of Mississippi: A Newly Found Memoir." Mississippi Law Journal 37, no. 1 (Dec. 1965): 28-54.

Charles Bowen Howry's (1844-1928) undated essay, "Rise and Progress of the University of Mississippi School of Governmental Science and Law," a brief nineteenth-century history of the university and especially of the early years of the law school.


Hemmingway, Theodore. "Booker T. Washington in Mississippi: October, 1908." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 1 (Feb. 1984): 29-42.

Washington's whistle-stop tour along the Illinois Central Railroad to promote his goals of education and economic self-sufficiency for African Americans.


Hemphill, Marie M. Fevers, Floods, and Faith: A History of Sunflower County, Mississippi, 1844-1976. Indianola, Miss.: the author, 1980. x, 849 pp.

County history includes chapters on towns, transportation, Parchman Penitentiary, public buildings, education, health, floods, business, and the civil rights movement of the 1960s.


Henderson, Donald H. "The Negro Migration of 1916-1918." Journal of Negro History 6, no. 4 (Oct. 1921): 383-498.

Compares the impact of African American outmigration on Mississippi, the "foremost contributor" to the exodus, to that of other southern states; also cites population statistics for 1920.


Henderson, Richey. Pontotoc County Men of Note. Pontotoc, Miss.: Pontotoc Progress Print, 1940. 74 pp.

Biographical sketches of twenty-five nineteenth-century citizens, including three Chickasaw chiefs.


Henderson, Russell J. "The 1963 Mississippi State Basketball Controversy and the Repeal of the Unwritten Law: 'Something more than the game will be lost.'" Journal of Southern History 63, no. 4 (Nov. 1997): 827-54.

Significance of the controversial decision to allow MSU's all-white team to play the integrated Loyola of Chicago team in the NCAA playoffs.


Hendrick, Burton, Jr. Statesman of the Lost Cause: Jefferson Davis and His Cabinet. N.Y.: Literary Guild of America, 1939. xvii, 452 pp.

Devotes considerable attention to Confederate diplomacy and finance.


Henry, Robert Selph. "First with the Most" Forrest. Indianapolis and N.Y.: Bobbs-Merrill, 1944. 558 pp.

Biography of Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-77) concentrates on his Civil War exploits but also includes a chapter on Forrest as grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, 1867-69.


Herbert, Hilary A., et al. Why the Solid South? or Reconstruction and Its Results. Baltimore, Md.: R.H. Woodward, 1890. xvii, 452 pp.

Includes "Reconstruction in Mississippi," by Ethelbert Barksdale.


Heritage Committee of the Yalobusha Historical Society. Yalobusha County History. Dallas, Tex.: National ShareGraphics, 1982. iv, [622] pp.

Covers early settlers, wars, churches, and schools; bulk of the volume comprised of family histories.


Hermann, Janet Sharp. Joseph E. Davis: Pioneer Patriarch. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1990. xii, 196 pp.

Biography of Davis (1784-1870), Warren County planter and elder brother of Jefferson Davis.


Hermann, Janet Sharp. The Pursuit of a Dream. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1981. xi, 290 pp.

Three related utopian experiments: Joseph Davis's attempt to create an ideal slave community at Hurricane Plantation, 1827-61; his former slave Benjamin T. Montgomery's establishment of the Davis Bend (Warren Co.) colony of freedmen; and Montgomery's son Isaiah's 1888 founding of the all-black town of Mound Bayou (Bolivar Co.); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Black Community at Davis Bend: The Pursuit of a Dream," University of California, Berkeley, 1979.


Hermann, Ruth. Gold and Silver Colossus: William Morris Stewart and His Southern Bride. Sparks, Nev.: Dave's, 1975. xxv, 430 pp.

Chapter nineteen deals with the marriage of U.S. senator Stewart of Nevada to Annie Elizabeth Foote (1834-1902), daughter of U.S. senator and governor of Mississippi Henry Stuart Foote; appendix provides information on the Foote family plantation in Hinds County.


Herndon, G. Melvin. "George Matthews, Frontier Patriot." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 77, no. 3 (July 1969): 307-28.

Includes brief account of Matthews (1739-1812) as an agent for the Georgia Mississippi Company during the period of the Yazoo land fraud.


Heroman, John Basil, Jr. "A Study of the Economic Development of the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley Railroad." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1934. viii, 145 l.

Business history of the railroad emphasizes the early twentieth century but also includes a chapter on the building of the system in the nineteenth century.


Herring, Todd A. "Kidnapped and Sold in Natchez: The Ordeal of Aaron Cooper, a Free Black Man." Journal of Mississippi History 60, no. 4 (Winter 1998): 341-53.

Cooper (b. 1770s) of Delaware was kidnapped and sold into slavery in 1811 and released in Natchez by the territorial Superior Court three years later.


Herring, Todd Ashley. "Saloons and Drinking in Mississippi from the Colonial Era to Prohibition." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1991. 180 l.

Cultural significance of saloons up to 1908.


Hesseltine, William B., and Larry Gara. "Mississippi's Confederate Leaders after the War." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 2 (Apr. 1951): 88-100.

Postwar careers of Jefferson Davis, L.Q.C. Lamar, Albert Gallatin Brown, Henry Stuart Foote, Benjamin Grubb Humphreys, Robert Lowry, Winfield Scott Featherston, Ethelbert Barksdale, Will T. Martin, Josiah A. Patterson Campbell, Jehu A. Orr, Mark Perrin Lowry, Stephen Dill Lee, A.P. Stewart, Reuben Davis, and Samuel Gibbs French.


Hesseltine, William B. "The Mississippi Career of Lyman C. Draper." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 3 (July 1953): 165-80.

Draper, later director of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, lived in Pontotoc (Pontotoc Co.) and published the Spirit of the Times from 1840 to 1843.


Hester, Louise Aldridge. "Benoit Union Church." Journal of the Bolivar County Historical Society 4 (1980): 18-24.

History of the Baptist/Methodist/Presbyterian church in Bolivar County.


Hester, Pauline L. Laurel and Jones County's Yesteryears: Stepping Stones to Tomorrow. N.p.: Published in cooperation with the Mississippi American Revolution Bicentennial Committee and the Laurel Bicentennial Committee, 1976. 72 pp.

Emphasizes the city's nineteenth- and twentieth-century history.


Hickerson, Thomas Felix. The Falkner Feuds: The Fatal Feuds of W.C. Falkner. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Colonial, 1964. xii, 32 pp.

Account of the 1889 killing of Tippah County businessman Richard J. Thurmond by his sometime business partner W.C. Falkner, great-grandfather of writer William Faulkner.


Hickman, Nollie W. "Logging and Rafting Timber in South Mississippi, 1840-1910." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 3 (July 1957): 154-72.

History of the lumber industry in the Piney Woods from its inception to its heyday in 1890-1910.


Hickman, Nollie W. "The Lumber Industry in South Mississippi, 1890-1915." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 4 (Oct. 1958): 211-23.

Beginning of large-scale lumber production in the state.


Hickman, Nollie. Mississippi Harvest: Lumbering in the Longleaf Pine Belt, 1840-1915. University, Miss.: University of Mississippi, 1962. 306 pp.

History of the longleaf (yellow) pine and related industries in southern Mississippi and their effects on land policy, workers, and railroad development in the region; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "History of Forest Industries in the Longleaf Pine Belt of East Louisiana and Mississippi, 1840-1915," University of Texas, 1958.


Hicks, Billy Ray. "Richard Aubrey McLemore and Mississippi College: A Study in Educational Leadership." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1983. 172 l.

Tenure of McLemore (1903-76) as president of Mississippi College, 1957-68; examines his leadership style and the civil rights controversy that marked the last years of his presidency.


Hicks, Myrtle Graham. History of the Woman's Work in the Synod of Mississippi, Presbyterian Church, U.S., 1822-1932. N.p, n.d. 139 pp.

Women's work in presbyteries throughout the state.


Hicks, Wanda Gatlin. "Travel on the Natchez Trace, 1790-1830." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1963. iv, 142 l.

Travel for trade, government business (including the mail and the military), and missionary activity; also examines dangers encountered by travelers and the decline of the trace.


Hiemstra, William L. "Early Presbyterian Missions Among the Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 10, no. 1 (Jan. 1948): 8-16.

Missions sponsored by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 1818-34.


Heimstra, William L. "Presbyterian Missionaries and Mission Churches among the Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, 1832-1865." Chronicles of Oklahoma 26, no. 4 (Winter 1948-49): 459-67.

Includes brief description of missionary activity in Mississippi, 1818-34; based on the author's master's thesis, "Presbyterian Missions among the Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, 1845-1862," University of Mississippi, 1947.


Higginbotham, Jay. "The Chaumont Concession: A French Plantation on the Pascagoula." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 4 (Nov. 1974): 353-62.

History, 1721-32, of the plantation in present-day Jackson County.


Higginbotham, Jay. Fort Maurepas: The Birth of Louisiana. Mobile, Ala.: Colonial, 1968. 93 pp. [x].

The garrison on the Bay of Biloxi, 1699-1702.


Higginbotham, Jay. "Henri de Tonti's Mission to the Chickasaw, 1702." Louisiana History 19, no. 3 (Summer 1978): 285-96.

Tonti led a mission to convince the warring Choctaw and Chickasaw to unite against continued English trading expansion from the East.


Higginbotham, Jay. The Pascagoula Indians. Mobile, Ala.: Colonial, 1967. 60 pp.

History and culture of the extinct Pascagoulas, a small tribe that lived near the Gulf Coast when the area was first settled by the French in 1699.


Higginbotham, Jay. Pascagoula: Singing River City. Mobile, Ala.: Gill, 1967. [iii], 160 pp. [42 pp. of plates].

Undocumented narrative history, 1699-1967.


Higginbotham, Sanford W. "The Writing of Mississippi History: A Brief Survey." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 3 (July 1958): 156-68.

State historiography.


Higgs, David Wilburn. "Eastman, Gardiner and Company and the Cohay Camps: A Mississippi Lumber Empire, 1892-1937." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1991. vi, 95 l.

Examines the economic importance of yellow pine lumbering to Laurel and Jones County, life in the logging camps, and the reasons for the industry's demise.


Hilbun, Ben Franklin, Jr. "The Dixiecrat Movement in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1955. 75 l.

Places the 1948 anti-civil rights Dixiecrats in the tradition of southern states' righters beginning with the nullification controversy of 1832.


Hilbun, Ben. William Flowers Hand: The Life and Philosophy of a Mississippi Scientist and Educator, 1873-1948. State College: Mississippi State College, 1952. 200 pp.

Biography of the Mississippi State College chemistry professor and administrator.


Hildreath, Howard P. "David Holmes." Virginia Cavalcade 16 (Spring 1967): 38-40.

Biographical sketch of Holmes (1770-1832), last territorial governor and first governor of the state of Mississippi and U.S. senator.


Hill, Homer Douglass. "Power and Change in a Mississippi Delta County: Coahoma Opportunities, Incorporated, 1965-1972." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1995. iv, 188 l.

History of the first federal anti-poverty program in the Delta; includes general history of Coahoma County from 1836.


Hill, Samuel S., ed. Religion in the Southern States: A Historical Study. Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 1983. 423 pp.

Includes essay on Mississippi by Edward Nelson Akin that briefly reviews the history of Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish congregations in the state.


Hill, Tomma Nan. "Thomas Hal Phillips: A Bio-Bibliography. M.A. thesis, Florida State University, 1957. ii, 66 l.

Introductory chapter sketches life of novelist Phillips (b. 1922) of Alcorn County.


Hilliard, Elbert Riley. "A Biography of Fielding Wright: Mississippi's Mr. State Rights." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1959. 117 l.

Life of Wright (1895-1956), governor of Mississippi and Dixiecrat vice presidential candidate in 1948.


Hilliard, Elbert R., and John E. Gonzales. "The First Forty Years: Editors of the Journal, 1939-1979." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 1 (Feb. 1979): 1-3.

History of the organization and leadership of the Journal of Mississippi History; also lists some editorial staff members.


Hilliard, Elbert R. "The Legislative Career of Fielding Wright." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 1 (Feb. 1979): 5-23.

Future governor Wright's role in Depression-era legislation, especially that affecting homestead exemption, highway construction, and sales tax.


Hills, Parker. A Study in Warfighting: Nathan Bedford Forrest and the Battle of Brice's Crossroads. Saline, Mich.: McNaughton and Gunn for the Blue and Gray Education Society, 1996. 64 pp.

Description and analysis of the 1864 battle in present-day Prentiss and Lee counties.


Hinds, Katherine Powell. "The Life and Works of Eudora Welty." M.A. thesis, Duke University, 1954. ii, 79 l.

Chapter one follows the writer's life from her birth in 1909 to 1954.


Hines, Mary Elizabeth. "Death at the Hands of Persons Unknown: The Geography of Lynching in the Deep South 1882 to 1910." Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, 1992. 312 l.

County-level geographic analysis of lynching in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi in the decades of greatest lynching activity.


Hines, Tom Spight, Jr. "Mississippi and the Prohibition Controversy (1932-1934)." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1960. 153 l.

Examines the last two years of national prohibition, when Mississippians, in statewide referenda, voted to retain prohibition at the local and state levels.


Hines, Tom S., Jr. "Mississippi and the Repeal of Prohibition: A Study of the Controversy over the Twenty-First Amendment." Journal of Mississippi History 24, no. 1 (Jan. 1962): 1-39.

Persons and organizations involved in the controversy, 1932-33.


Hinman-Smith, Daniel Peter. "'Does the Word Freedom Have a Meaning?' The Mississippi Freedom Schools, the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, and the Search for Freedom through Education." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina, 1993. 600 l.

Examines the educational and political significance of two "educational experiments": the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools and the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, which also began in 1964.


Hise, Dan. Faulkner's Rowan Oak. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1993. 72 pp.

Heavily illustrated history of the antebellum Oxford (Lafayette Co.) house that writer William Faulkner owned from 1930 to 1962.


Historical Catalogue of the University of Mississippi, 1849-1909. University: University of Mississippi, 1910. vi, 406 pp.

Includes narrative history of the university and of is various academic departments and biographical sketches of presidents and chancellors; updates a similar, but inaccessible, publication of 1900.


Historical Committee of the Wilkinson County Civil War Centennial Commemoration, comp. Wilkinson County Historical Facts and Legends: Pertaining to the County and Its Communities, Institutions and Early Settlers. N.p., 1962. 36 pp.

Brief essays on settlers, Rosemont Plantation, West Feliciana Railroad, towns, and churches.


A History of Petal. Petal, Miss.: Kopy Shop, 1976. 60 pp.

Bicentennial history of two Forrest County logging towns, Petal and Harvey.


A History of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Proto-Cathedral of Mississippi, Commemorating Its One Hundredth Anniversary. Oxford, Miss.: n.p., 1951. [19] pp.

Brief narrative history of the Oxford (Lafayette Co.) congregation.


Hitt, Gwen Keys. Covington Crossroads: A History of Covington County, Mississippi. N.p., 1985. [iv], 101 pp.

Includes information on Choctaws, early settlements, Civil War and Reconstruction, World War I, African American schools, agriculture, newspapers, hospitals, and Governor Martin S. Conner; bulk of the volume comprised of histories of sixty-seven communities.


Hobbs, Richard Stanley. "The Cayton Legacy: Two Generations of a Black Family, 1859-1976." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, 1989. 563 l.

History of a prominent African American family in Seattle with roots in Mississippi; Susie Revels Cayton was the daughter of U.S. senator Hiram Revels.


Hobson, Fred. But Now I See: The White Southern Racial Conversion Narrative. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Unversity Press, 1999. xiv, 159 pp.

See chapters two, "God's Determination: James McBride Dabbs, Sarah Patton Boyle, Will Campbell," and three, "Freedom: Willie Morris, Larry L. King, Pat Watters."


Hochmuth, Marie Kathryn, ed. A History and Criticism of American Public Addresses. Volume 3. N.Y.: Longmans Green, 1955. 3 vols.

Includes "Lucius Q.C. Lamar," by Dallas C. Dickey and Donald C. Streeter, which analyzes Lamar's 1874 eulogy of Charles Sumner.


Hodge, Jo Dent. "The Lumber Industry in Laurel, Mississippi, at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 4 (Nov. 1973): 361-79.

Transformation of Laurel from hamlet to lumber town, 1880-1900; based on the author's master's thesis, "Lumbering in Laurel at the Turn of the Century," University of Mississippi, 1965.


Hodge, Sara Wiley. "Attitude of the Woodville Republican toward National Questions, 1823-1848." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1929. 52 l.

Opinions on the tariff, states' rights, nullification, banks, presidential candidates, slavery, Indians, annexation of Texas, education, inventions, the Monroe Doctrine, and trade; based on letters to the editor and editorials in the small Wilkinson County newspaper.


Hoerl, Henry Gordon. "Development of the Illinois Central Railroad System in Mississippi, 1865-1892." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1975. iv, 159 l.

Illinois Central's domination of north-south rail traffic through the state, whereby it controlled agricultural and import-export trade between Chicago and New Orleans.


Hoffheimer, Michael H. "L.Q.C. Lamar 1825-1893." Mississippi Law Journal 63, no. 1 (Fall 1993): 5-106.

Lengthy article focuses on analysis of Lamar's legal career; includes bibliography.


Hoffheimer, Michael H. "Mississippi Courts: 1790-1868." Mississippi Law Journal 65, no. 1 (Fall 1995): 99-170.

Examines the jurisdiction of territorial and state courts prior to the state constitution of 1868.


Holcomb, Bob Charles. "Senator Joe Bailey: Two Decades of Controversy." Ph.D. dissertation, Texas Technological College, 1968. 544 l.

First chapter reviews Bailey's years in Mississippi, 1863-85.


Holcomb, Gene. "The Mississippi Governor's Mansion." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 1 (Jan. 1940): 3-21.

History of the Jackson (Hinds Co.) mansion since its dedication in 1842.


Holcomb, Mrs. Gene [Elizabeth], comp. The Hundredth Anniversary of the First Baptist Church, Tupelo, Mississippi: The Highlights of One Hundred Years of Progress, August 19, 1950. Tupelo, Miss.: n.p., [1950]. 40 pp.

Institutional history.


Holder, Ray. "The Brown-Winans Canvass for Congress, 1849." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 4 (Nov. 1978): 353-73.

Unsuccessful campaign by Whig clergyman William Winans to unseat Democratic incumbent Albert Gallatin Brown was characterized by issues of Winan's fitness for office and congressional authority over slavery in the territories.


Holder, Ray. "Centenary: Roots of a Pioneer College (1838-1844)." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 2 (May 1980): 77-98.

Centenary College, since relocated to Shreveport, Louisiana, was established in Brandon Springs (Rankin Co.) by Methodists in 1838 and moved to Jackson (Hinds Co.) in 1844.


Holder, Ray. "Elijah Steele 'Undeclared Saint.'" Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 2 (May 1986): 135-53.

Life of evangelist Steele (1814-41), including his role in the development of the Methodist Church in Mississippi and Louisiana.


Holder, Ray. The Mississippi Methodists, 1799-1983: A Moral People 'Born of Conviction.' N.p.: Maverick Prints, 1984. xi, 216 pp.

History of the denomination in the state from its introduction in 1799.


Holder, Ray. "Parson Winans' Pilgrimage to 'The Natchez,' Winter of 1810." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 1 (Feb. 1982): 47-67.

Based on Winans's autobiography, describes his journey from Ohio and the problems he encountered in beginning his Methodist ministry in the Natchez region.


Holder, Ray. William Winans: Methodist Leader in Antebellum Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1977. viii, 232 pp.

Biography of "Bishop" Winans (1788-1857), pioneer Methodist leader, 1810-57; see also the author's master's thesis, "The Autobiography of William Winans," University of Mississippi, 1963.


Holley, Donald. The Second Great Emancipation: The Mechanical Cotton Picker, Black Migration, and How They Shaped the Modern South. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2000. xvi, 284 pp.



Holley, Donald. Uncle Sam's Farmers: The New Deal Communities in the Lower Mississippi Valley. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1975. xv, 312 pp.

Examines resettlement efforts and model communities in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; one chapter devoted to homestead projects in Mississippi, especially in McComb (Pike Co.); winner of the Agricultural History Society Book Award; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The New Deal and Farm Tenancy: Rural Resettlement in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi," Louisiana State University, 1969.


Holley, Jewel Elaine Puckett. "From Tubb's Crossroads to Hatley." Journal of Monroe County History 5 (1979): 32-38.

Early settlers in the Hatley area.


Holley, Mrs. J.W. [Mattie Flora]. "Early Settlements in Southern Noxubee." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 30 (June 1984): 6-7.

Villages, settlers, steamboats, and the railroad, 1837-59.


Holley, Mrs. J.W. [Mattie Flora]. "Shequalak Female College." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 1 (May 1977): 4-6.

Brief history of the Baptist school, 1880-97.


Hollister, Katharine Stevens. "The Theatre in Jackson, 1890-1910." Journal of Mississippi History 17, no. 2 (Apr. 1955): 127-34.

Much of the article devoted to the cultural milieu of the Hinds County city in the years before motion pictures; only one actual play production is mentioned.


Holman, Phil Nathan. "At the Starting Line: Jim Silver, a Southern White Liberal, and the Civil Rights Movement in America." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1992. v, 202 l.

Examines the life and thought of University of Mississippi history professor James Wesley Silver (1907-88), author of Mississippi: The Closed Society (1964), a first-person account of the integration of the university in 1962.


Holmes, Anne Darden. New Albany, Mississippi: 1840-1990. N.p., 1990. 136 pp.

Illustrated sesquicentennial commemorative booklet includes brief general history and numerous vignettes of the Union County town.


Holmes, George Blake. "The Life and Contributions of George Frederick Holmes, Scholar, Teacher, and Writer (1820-1897)." M.A. thesis, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1957. 177 l.

Life of the first president of the University of Mississippi.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Anne White Hutchins-Anthony's Better Half?" Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 2 (May 1975): 203-208.

Brief sketch of the wife and nine children of Natchez settler Anthony Hutchins, who exiled himself to England after the Natchez Rebellion of 1781 and left his family behind.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Barton Hannon in the Old Southwest." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 1 (Feb. 1982): 69-79.

Recounts the Natchez Revolt of 1797, which was sparked by the beating and imprisonment of Baptist clergyman Hannon by Spanish authorities.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Cotton Gins in the Spanish Natchez District, 1795-1800." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 3 (Aug. 1969): 159-71.

Argues that cotton was already an important crop in Spanish Natchez and that the Spanish government encouraged the building of cotton gins.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "The End of 'The Star of the West.'" Civil War Times 3 (Oct. 1961): 24.

Sinking of the captured Union transport in the Tallahatchie River near Greenwood (Leflore Co.) in 1863.


Holmes, Jack D.L. Gayoso: The Life of a Spanish Governor in the Mississippi Valley, 1789-1799. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1965. x, 305 pp.

Biography of Manuel Luis Gayoso de Lemos y Amorin (1749-99), governor Spanish-held West Florida, of which the Natchez District was a part; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Gallant Emissary: The Political Career of Manuel Gayoso de Lemos in the Mississippi Valley," University of Texas, 1959.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Irish Priests in Spanish Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 3 (Aug. 1967): 169-80.l

Activities of priests sent to the Natchez District to spread the Roman Catholic faith, 1779-98.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Juan de la Villebeuvre: Spain's Commandant of Natchez during the American Revolution." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 1 (Feb. 1975): 97-129.

Career of the Spanish officer who surrendered Fort Panmure to the Tory chief of the Natchez Rebellion on May 4, 1781.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Law and Order in Spanish Natchez, 1781-1798." Journal of Mississippi History 25, no. 3 (July 1963): 186-201.

Crime and punishment during the Spanish period.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Livestock in Spanish Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 23, no. 1 (Jan. 1961): 15-37.

The Natchez District was the center of the livestock industry for Spanish posts on the Mississippi River, 1789-98; article includes livestock regulations, 1793-94.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Medical Pratice in the Lower Mississippi Valley during the Spanish Period, 1769-1803." Alabama Journal of Medical Sciences 1, no. 3 (July 1964): 332-38.

Diseases and medical practices in the Spanish Natchez District.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "The Mississippi County That 'Seceded' from the Confederate States of America." Civil War Times Illustrated 3, no. 10 (Feb. 1965): 45-50.

Activities of a pro-Union band of about 125 guerillas led by Newton Knight and Jasper Collins in Jones and Jasper counties in 1863 and 1864.


Holmes, Jack D.L. "Stephen Minor: Natchez Pioneer." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 1 (Feb. 1980): 17-26.

Life of Minor (1760-1815), Natchez planter and owner of Deer and Ship islands off the Mississippi Gulf Coast.


Holmes, William F. "James K. Vardaman and Prison Reform in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 3 (Aug. 1965): 229-48.

Abolition of convict leasing and improved penitentiary management enacted by the 1906 legislative session.


Holmes, William F. "James K. Vardaman: From Bourbon to Agrarian Reformer." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 2 (May 1969): 97-115.

Changes in political tactics that won Vardaman the governorship in 1903 after two losses: he appealed to rural voters by championing primary elections and sharply diminished education for African Americans, and he railed against Republicans and Eastern "money power."


Holmes, William F. "The Leflore County Massacre and the Demise of the Colored Farmers' Alliance." Phylon 34, no. 3 (Sept. 1973): 267-74.

Evaluates conflicting evidence of the 1889 racial disorder near Minter City, concluding that a massacre of Colored Alliance members and others by a sheriff's posse did occur and that the incident illustrates the purpose and effect of post-Reconstruction violence.


Holmes, William F. The White Chief: James Kimble Vardaman. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1970. xiii, 418 pp.

Biography of the governor and U.S. senator (1861-1930) traces his rise in state politics, the origin of his racist appeal to voters, his progressive accomplishments, his opposition to American entry into World War I, and his defeat by Byron P. "Pat" Harrison; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The White Chief: James K. Vardaman in Mississippi Politics, 1890-1908," Rice University, 1964.


Holmes, William F. "Whitecapping: Agaraian Violence in Mississippi, 1902-1906." Journal of Southern History 35, no. 2 (May 1969): 165-85.

White farmer clubs in Amite, Franklin, and Lincoln counties attempted to control African Americans by forcing them off lands they owned or rented from merchants; much of the article concerns state efforts to apprehend and punish perpetrators.


Holmes, William F. "Whitecapping in Mississippi: Agrarian Violence in the Populist Era." Mid-America 55, no. 2 (Apr. 1973): 134-48.

Describes terrorist activities of the "dirt farmer movement" of the 1890s, particularly in Brookhaven (Lincoln Co.).


Holmes, William F. "Whitecapping: Anti-Semitism in the Populist Era." American Jewish Historical Quarterly 63 (1974): 244-61.

Activities in Amite, Franklin, and Lincoln counties of the agrarian whitecaps, who terrorized African American farmers and Jewish merchants during 1892 and 1893.


Holmes, William F. "William Alexander Percy and the Bourbon Era in Mississippi Politics." Mississippi Quarterly 26, no. 1 (Winter 1972-73): 71-87.

Disputes Percy's version (in Lanterns on the Levee) of post-Reconstruction politics, particularly General S.W. Ferguson's levee board graft.


Holt, David, ed. and comp. Facts and Fiction About the Queen City of the Mississippi Gulf Coast: Biloxi, Harrison County. Biloxi, Miss.: Daily Herald Printery, 1904. 45 pp., [iii].

Tourist booklet includes some early anecdotal history.


Holt, Len. The Summer That Didn't End: The Story of the Mississippi Civil Rights Project of 1964 and Its Challenge to the Future of America. N.Y.: William Morrow, 1965. 351 pp.

Includes chapters on the Neshoba County murders, freedom schools, and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party at the Democratic National Convention.


Holtzclaw, Robert Fulton. Black Magnolias: A Brief History of the Afro-Mississippian, 1865-1980. Shaker Heights, Ohio: Keeble, 1984. x, 235 pp.

Includes biographical sketches.


Holzer, Scott. "Boomtown: The Social Transformation of Pascagoula, Mississippi, 1940-1943." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1991. vi, 145 l.

Shortages of housing and food, inadequate schools, and other problems related to the city's rapid expansion during World War II as Ingalls Shipbuilding employed thousands of workers to fulfill defense contracts.


Honeycutt, Judy G. "Mississippi in the Mexican War." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1970. v, 80 l.

Based largely on newspaper sources, examines involvement in and attitudes toward the war, 1846-48.


Hooker, Robert Wright. "Race and the News Media in Mississippi, 1962-1964." M.A. thesis, Vanderbilt University, 1971. v, 296 l.

Compared coverage by newspapers (the Jackson (Hinds Co.) Clarion-Ledger, Daily News, and Advocate; the McComb (Pike Co.) Enterprise-Journal; the Meridian (Lauderdale Co.) Star; and the Greenville (Washington Co.) Delta Democrat-Times) of 1962-65 civil rights movement stories, including the integration of the University of Mississippi, the murder of Medgar Evers, Freedom Summer, the Neshoba County slayings, violence in McComb, and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.


Hopkins, Bessie Cooper. "Life and Lore of the Old Natchez Region." Ph.D. dissertation, George Peabody College for Teachers, 1957. iv, 418 l.

Folklore and folklife in antebellum Amite, Wilkinson, Adams, Franklin, Jefferson, Claiborne, and Warren counties.


Hopkins, Jerry. Elvis: A Biography. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 1971. 448 pp.

Undocumented biography of Elvis Aaron Presley (1935-77), who was born in Tupelo (Lee Co.).


Hopkins, Jerry. Elvis: The Final Years. N.Y.: St. Martin's, 1980. 258 pp.

Second undocumented Elvis Presley biography by the same author covers the period from 1970 to 1977.


Horn, Stanley F. Invisible Empire: Story of the Ku Klux Klan, 1866-1871. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1939. x, 434 pp.

Chapter six, "Mississippi," delineates two distinct periods of Klan activity during Reconstruction and contains accounts of the Meridian Riot of 1871 (Lauderdale Co.) and U.S. v. Walton, et al. (1871), in which Monroe County KKK members were tried for murder in federal court in Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Horton, William Boyd. "The Life of David Holmes." M.A. thesis, University of Colorado, 1935. 88 l.

Holmes (1770-1832) was territorial governor of Mississippi, president of the 1817 constitutional convention, first governor of the state of Mississippi, and U.S. senator.


Hosmer, John H., and Joseph Fineman. "Black Congressmen in Reconstruction Historiography." Phylon 39, no. 2 (June 1978): 97-107.

Calls for reappraisal of African Americans in Congress, including Mississippians Blanche K. Bruce, Hiram Revels, and John R. Lynch.


Hospodor, Gregory Scott. "The Mississippi Ku Klux Klan during Reconstruction." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1991. vii, 164 l.

Identifies two distinct styles of Klan activity: one characterized by low violence toward African Americans in cotton-producing counties, and the other characterized by violence unrestrained by economic considerations in the non-cotton-producing majority-white counties.


House, Boyce. "Confederate Navy Hero Put the Flag Back in Place!" Tennessee Historical Quarterly 19, no. 2 (June 1960): 172-75.

Captain Dabney M. Scales (1842-1920) tied the Confederate flag back up after it was shot down in an 1862 engagement with ironclads by the Arkansas on the Yazoo River.


Houston, G. David. "A Negro Senator." Journal of Negro History 7 (1922): 243-56.

Career of Blanche K. Bruce, one of two African American U.S. senators from Mississippi during Reconstruction.


Howard, C.N. "Colonial Natchez: The Early British Period." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 3 (July 1945): 156-70.

Cover the period from 1763 to 1768.


Howard, C.N. "The Interval of Military Government in West Florida." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 22, no. 1 (Jan. 1939): 3-15.

Mentions Choctaw hostility to British government.


Howard, C.N. "Some Economic Aspects of British West Florida, 1763-1768." Journal of Southern History 6, no. 2 (May 1940): 201-21.

Settlements established, including Natchez, along the Mississippi River.


Howard, Clinton N. The British Development of West Florida, 1763-1769. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1947. viii, 166 pp.

Brief narrative with analysis of land grants.


Howard, E.F. History of the Mississippi State Medical Association, with Biographies of Its Presidents, Complete Roster of Its Officers, Programmes of Its Meetings, and Past and Present Laws Relating to the Practice of Medicine in Mississippi. N.p.: Mississippi State Medical Association, 1910. 171 pp.

History of the association from 1856, including laws relating to physicians beginning in 1819.


Howard, H.R., comp. The History of Virgil A. Stewart and His Adventure in Capturing and Exposing the Great "Western Land Pirate" and His Gang, in Connexion with the Evidence; and Also of the Trials, Confessions, and Execution of a Number of Murrell's Associates in the State of Mississippi During the Summer of 1835, and the Execution of Five Professional Gamblers by the Citizens of Vicksburg, on the 6th July, 1835. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1839. 273 pp.

Sensational events of the summer of 1835 surrounding the outlaw John A. Murrell (1806-45).


Howard, John. Men Like That: A Southern Queer History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999. 360 pp.

Extent of and attitude toward male homosexuality in Mississippi since 1945; includes material on civil rights activists Bill Higgs and Aaron Henry, Congressman John Hinson, Governor Bill Allain, and many others.


Howell, Elmo. "Governor Alexander G. McNutt of Mississippi: Humorist of the Old Southwest." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 2 (May 1973): 153-65.

Backwoods sketches written by McNutt for the Spirit of the Times, 1844-47.


Howell, Elmo. Mississippi Home-Places: Notes on Literature and History. Memphis, Tenn.: the author, 1988. xvi, 266 pp.

Gazetteer of sites (mostly houses), many associated with Mississippi writers.


Howell, Elmo. Mississippi Scenes: Notes on Literature and History. Memphis, Tenn.: the author, 1992. xvii, 330 pp.

Organized by town, illustrates and describes houses and other structures and historical or literary significance.


Howell, Elmo. "A Southwestern Humorist in Itawamba County." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 3, no. 1 (Dec. 1969): 33-37.

Alexander McNutt, governor of Mississippi from 1838 to 1842, wrote eight humorous sketches under the pseudonym "The Turkey Runner" which were published in the Spirit of the Times in the 1840s; the article's title refers to one of the sketches which was set in Itawamba County.


Howell, Eugene A. Historical and Personal Sketches. Canton, Miss.: the author, 1943. 124 pp.

Includes information on Madison County families (Howell, May, Weathersby), communities, citizens, and churches.


Howell, George W. "The Buttahatchie Settlers." Journal of Mississippi History 34, nos. 1-4 (1972).

Biographical and genealogical information about families who settled the area now known as Lowndes and Monroe counties, 1815-20.


Howell, George W. "Monroe County and Her People to February 9, 1821." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 4, no. 1 (Mar. 1971): 1-52.

History of the area which was part of Marion County, Alabama, from 1817 to 1821; lists names of the first permanent white residents.


Howell, H. Grady, Jr. Going to Meet the Yankees: A History of the "Bloody Sixth" Mississippi Infantry, C.S.A. Jackson, Miss.: Chickasaw Bayou, 1981. xiv, 388 pp.

Regimental history recounts battles, including Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Howell, Walter Gerald. "An Appraisal of the 1868 Mississippi Constitutional Convention and Its Negro Delegates." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1964. iv, 102 l.

Discusses delegates' work in framing the Reconstruction constitution and evaluates qualifications of the sixteen African American delegates.


Hoyt, Anne Kelley. Bibliography of the Chickasaw. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow, 1987. Native American Bibliography series, no. 11. 212 pp.

Annotated bibliography of books and articles on the Chickasaws, who lived in northern Mississippi before their removal to Indian Territory in the 1830s.


Hubbard, W.J. "Hashuqua Manufacturing Company (known locally as 'The Old Factory')." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 3 (Sept. 1977): 4-6.

Textile factory on Hashuqua Creek, 1867-1926.


Huber, Leonard V. "The Mississippi Leviathans." Louisiana History 22, no. 3 (Summer 1981): 239-51.

Very large (100-2500 tons) steamboats on the Mississippi and Ohio rivers after the Civil War.


Huddleston, Wiley R. "The Senatorial Campaign and Career of James Kimble Vardaman, Mississippi's 'White Chief.'" M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1935. iv, 149 l.

Campaign of 1911 and Vardaman's views on race, progressive reform, World War I, and President Woodrow Wilson.


Hudson, Arthur Palmer. "Bethel Lodge and Palmer's Hall in Mississippi, 1849-1869." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 1 (Jan. 1951): 3-20.

History of the Masonic order, Bethel Lodge, and its meeting place, Palmer's Hall (Attala Co.).


Hudson, Charles, and Carmen Chaves Tesser, eds. The Forgotten Centuries: Indians and Europeans in the American South, 1521-1704. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994. viii, 472 pp.

Includes "The Hernando de Soto Expedition, 1539-1543," by Charles Hudson; "The Structure of Southeastern Chiefdoms," by Randolph J. Widmer; "The Southeastern Indians and the English Trade in Skims and Slaves," by Joel W. Martin; and "Confederacy as a Solution to Chiefdom Dissolution," by Patricia Galloway.


Hudson, Charles. The Southeastern Indians. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1976. xviii, 573 pp.

Includes information on the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Natchez tribes in Mississippi.


Hudson, Tim William. "The Politics of Industrial Development in Mississippi: A Spatial Analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, Clark University, 1980. 253 l.

Chapter two includes discussion of the Balance Agriculture with Industry (BAWI) program initiated during the Great Depression.


Hudson-Weems, Clenora. Emmett Till: The Sacrificial Lamb of the Civil Rights Movement. Troy, Mich.: Bedford, 1994. xviii, 371 pp.

Argues that the 1955 murder of Till in Tallahatchie County launched the civil rights movement; majority of the text devoted to interviews (including one of Till's mother, Mamie Bradley) and documents; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Emmett Till: Impetus for the Modern Civil Rights Movement," University of Iowa, 1988. See also her article, "Resurrecting Emmett Till: The Catalyst of the Modern Civil Rights Movement," Journal of Black Studies 29, no. 2 (1998).


Huey, Gary. Rebel with a Cause: P.D. East, Southern Liberalism, and the Civil Rights Movement, 1953-71. Wilmington, Del.: Scholarly Resources, 1985. xii, 232 pp.

Anomalous life and career of Percy Dale East (1921-71), publisher of the Petal Paper (Forrest Co.), in which East expressed, often through humor, his increasingly progressive positions on racial issues; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "P.D. East: Southern Liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement, 1953-1971," Washington State University, 1981.


Huff, Frances R. "The Relationship of Oxford and the University of Mississippi, 1848-1947." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1947. v, 136 l, [iii].

Discusses the history of the university and the lives of selected faculty and administrators.


Huffman, Alan; photographs by Florence West Huffman. Ten Point: Deer Camp in the Mississippi Delta. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1997. 144 pp.

Photographs and narrative history of Ten Point Deer Camp on Steele Bayou (Issaquena Co.), 1930s-60s, document the hunting life in one of the last heavily wooded areas of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta to be cleared for flood control projects.


Hughes, Dudley J. Oil in the Deep South: A History of the Oil Business in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, 1859-1945. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi for the Mississippi Geological Society, 1993. xv, 267 pp.

Information on Mississippi in scattered chapters; concentrates on the period from 1926 to 1945.


Hughes, Langston. Famous American Music Makers. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1955. 179 pp.

Brief biographies including African American composer William Grant Still (b. 1895) of Woodville (Wilkinson Co.).


Huie, William Bradford. Three Lives for Mississippi. N.Y.: WCC Books, 1965. 252 pp, ii.

Reporter's account of the 1964 murders of civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, James Cheney, and Andrew Goodman in Neshoba County.


Hume, Alfred. "On L.Q.C. Lamar." Mississippi Law Journal 2, no. 4 (May 1930): 367-68.

Brief biographical sketch.


Hume, Richard L. "The 'Black and Tan' Constitutional Conventions of 1867-1869 in Ten Former Confederate States: A Study of Their Membership." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, 1969. 765 l.

Includes one chapter on the Mississippi convention of 1868; "black and tan" refers to the fact that the conventions were racially integrated.


Humes, Edward. Mississippi Mud: A True Story from a Corner of the Deep South. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 1994. 364 pp.

Account of the 1987 murders of Margaret and Vincent Sherry in Biloxi (Harrison Co.) and of the determination of their daughter Lynne S. Sposito to find the culprits.


Humphrey, George D. "The Failure of the Mississippi Freedmen's Bureau in Black Labor Relations, 1865-1867." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 1 (Feb. 1983): 23-37.

Discusses the failure of the bureau to provide land to freedmen, protect them from violence, and prevent exploitation by former slaveowners.


Humphrey, George Duke. "Public Education for Whites in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 3, no. 1 (Jan. 1941): 26-36.

History of white public schools since the 1840s; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Public Education for Whites in Mississippi: A Historical and Interpretive Study," Ohio State University, 1939. See also his master's thesis, "A History of the Public School Funds of Mississippi," University of Chicago, 1931.


Humphreys, Margaret. Yellow Fever and the South. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992. x, 226 pp.

Describes the role of yellow fever eradication efforts in the growth of the U.S. Public Health Service, 1879-1910, and demonstrates how and why southern public health institutions and officials differed significantly from northern ones; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation (published under the name Margaret Ellen Warner), "Public Health in the New South: Government, Medicine and Society in the Control of Yellow Fever," Harvard University, 1983.


Hurns, Walter McClusky. "Post-Reconstruction Municipal Politics in Jackson, Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, Kansas State University, 1989. 197 l.

Examines Republican-controlled Jackson (Hinds Co.) city government, 1875-87, and contends that many African Americans were allowed to vote in local elections.


Hurns, Walter M. "The Response of the Black Community in Mississippi to the Dixiecrat Movement in 1948." M.A. thesis, Morehead State University, 1972. ii, 127 l.

Characterizes 1948 as the "year of the political awakening for the black community in Mississippi;" includes some material on Percy Greene, editor of the Jackson Advocate, and other African American leaders.


Hurst, Jack. Nathan Bedford Forrest: A Biography. N.Y.: Knopf, 1993. 434 pp.

Extensive biography includes material on the founding of the Ku Klux Klan.


Hurt, Marshall. Half a Century with Jackson, 1889-1939. Jackson, Miss.: Jackson-State National Bank, 1939. 32 pp.

Brief undocumented history of Jackson (Hinds Co.) emphasizes business, especially the Jackson-State National Bank.


Husley, Fabian V. "History of the Third Mississippi Infantry Regiment, C.S.A." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1964. 115 l.

Civil War engagement of the Gulf Coast regiment, which sustained very heavy losses.


Hyman, Michael R. The Anti-Redeemers: Hill-Country Political Dissenters in the Lower South from Redemption to Populism. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1990.

Characterizes post-Reconstruction dissent in the hill country of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia as a nationally typical phenomenon, not, as sometimes claimed, merely a prelude to the populism of the 1890s.

In and About Vicksburg: An Illustrated Guide Book to the City of Vicksburg, Mississippi, Its History, Its Appearance, Its Business Houses, to Which is Added a Description of the Resources and Progress of the State of Mississippi, as an Inviting Field for Immigration and Capital. Vicksburg, Miss.: Gibraltar, 1890. 271 pp.

Combines history and partial city directory, including many advertisements.


Ingle, Edward. "A Note on Mississippi Population, 1850-1860." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 247-51.

Examines the last antebellum decade, when Mississippi's population growth first began to decline relative to that of the country at large.


Inglis, Gordon Douglas. "Anthony Hutchins: Early Natchez Planter." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1973. iv, 102 l.

Life of the influential early settler from North Carolina (c. 1720-1804).


Ingram, Anthony Bruce. "Stones: The Interaction of Baptist Life and the Community in Tippah County, Mississippi, 1840-1930." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1994.

137 l.

Examines changing denominational discipline and goals.


Ireys, Henry T. "County Seats and Early Railroads of Washington County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 14 (1914): 267-300.

Founding of the county in 1827; history of the four county seats: New Mexico, Princeton, Old Greenville, and Greenville; changes in county boundaries; and postbellum railroad schemes.


Israel, Kenneth Davidson. "A Geographical Analysis of the Cattle Industry in Southwestern Mississippi from Its Beginnings to 1860." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1970. 134 l.

History of the short-lived longhorn cattle industry in Mississippi, which had its heyday in the 1840s.


Izard, E. Ray. History of the Bethel Baptist Church, 1867-1967. Hazelhurst, Miss.: n.p., [1967?]. 101 pp.

Institutional history of the Hazelhurst (Copiah Co.) church.


Izard, Edgar Ray, and Rowe C. Holcomb. History of the First Baptist Church, 1870-1970. Hazelhurst, Miss.: n..p., n.d. 171 pp.

Institutional history of the Hazelhurst (Copiah Co.) church.


Jacklin, Thomas M. "Mission to the Sharecroppers: Neo-Orthodox Radicalism and the Delta Farm Venture, 1936-40." South Atlantic Quarterly 78, no. 3 (Summer 1979): 302-16.

Attempts by Christian realists to aid Yazoo-Mississippi Delta sharecroppers by establishing interracial collective farms-the Delta Farm in Bolivar County and the Providence Cooperative Farm in Holmes County.


Jackson, Annie Kate Hollingsworth. "The Political Rise of Martin Sennett Conner." M.S. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1950. 101 l.

Biographical study of Conner of Covington County, who served as governor of Mississippi from 1932 to 1936.


Jackson, David Hamilton, Jr. "Charles Banks: A Black Leader in Mississippi, 1873-1915." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Memphis, 1997. 306 l.

Biography of Banks, Booker T. Washington's Mississippi "lieutenant," and, according to the author, the most powerful African American in the state, 1900-15.


Jackson, Maurice Elizabeth. "Mound Bayou-A Study in Social Development." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1937. iv, 102 l.

Sociological study of the all-black Bolivar County town includes one chapter on its history from its establishment by Isaiah Montgomery in 1887.


Jackson, W. Harvell. By the Rivers of Water: History of George County, Mississippi. N.p., 1978. 2 vols.

Extensive history covers families, geography, churches, citizens, businesses, railroads, and more; the organization makes the volumes difficult to use.


"Jacob Faser." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 39 (Sept. 1986): 3,6.

Sketch of early Macon settler (1823-92).


Jacoway, Elizabeth, and David R. Colburn, eds. Southern Businessmen and Desegregation. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1982. x, 324 pp.

Includes essay by Charles Sallis and John Quincy Adams, "Desegregation in Jackson, Mississippi," which deals with the city's initially defiant response to the Brown decision and the subsequent moderation by some businessman after early 1960s confrontations were perceived to create a bad business climate.


James, Anthony W. "A Demand for Racial Equality: The 1970 Black Student Protest at the University of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 2 (Summer 1995): 97-120.

Causes and consequences of protests in which African American students were arrested and spent one night in Parchman Penitentiary.


James, Anthony. "Paternalism's Demise: Blind Jim Ivy and Ole Miss, 1896-1955." Mississippi Folklife 28, no. 1 (Winter/Spring 1995): 17-24.

Life of James Ivy (1872-1955), who served as an unofficial symbol both of the University of Mississippi and of the paternalism that characterized Mississippi race relations.


James, D. Clayton. Antebellum Natchez. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1968. xiv, 344 pp.

History of Natchez (Adams Co.) examines the lives of the town's middle- and working-class residents as well as those of the planters; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, University of Texas, 1964, and his master's thesis, "Territorial Natchez," University of Texas, 1959.


James, D. Clayton. "Mississippi Agriculture, 1861-1865." Journal of Mississippi History 24, no. 3 (July 1962): 129-41.

Reasons for the failure of Mississippi agriculture to supply the Confederacy.


James, D. Clayton. "Municipal Government in Territorial Natchez." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 2 (May 1965): 148-67.

Depicts Natchez government of 1803-17 as dominated by middle-class businessmen.


James, D. Clayton. "The Role of the Natchez Trace in the Development of the Nation." Southern Quarterly 29, no. 4 (Summer 1991): 21-34.

Uses of the trace: by the French to settle Indian lands, by Congress as a federal post road, by the U.S. Army to launch its Civil War offensive against Vicksburg (Warren Co.), and by modern visitors to the Natchez Trace Parkway.


James, Edward W. "The Forgotten Mayor, L.F. Chiles of Jackson-1893-94." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1967. v, 146 l.

Review the administration of Lewis Ford Chiles (1843-1911).


James, Newton Haskin. "Josiah Hinds: Versatile Pioneer of the Old Southwest." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 1 (Jan. 1940): 22-33.

Life of a frontier jack-of-all-trades (1801-64) who lived in Itawamba, Chickasaw, and DeSoto counties; based on the author's master's thesis, "The Journal of Josiah Hinds, April 23, 1839," University of Mississippi, 1939.


James, Thomas Garner. "A History of the Mississippi Gulf Coast from November 11, 1918, to November 11, 1928." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1930. vi, 355 l.

Events in Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson counties as revealed in the Gulfport Daily Herald.


"James B. Shelton, Tex Assessor." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 39 (Sept. 1986): 8.

Brief sketch of Shelton (d. 1885).


"James Kincannon-Prominent Noxubeean and Tupelo Editor." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 16 (Mar. 1980): 7-8.

Sketch of the editor (b. 1905) of the Tupelo Journal.


Jamison, Lena Mitchell. "The Natchez Trace: A Federal Highway of the Old Southwest." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 2 (Apr. 1939): 82-99.

From Indian trail to highway and mail route, 1798-1830; based on the author's master's thesis, "The Natchez Trace," University of Wisconsin, 1938, which also examines the effects of competing river commerce and inns, stations, and historic sites on the trace.


Jareo, David James. "Some Aspects of Negro Education in the Gulf Southwest during the Reconstruction Period, 1865-1870." M.A. thesis, University of Cincinnati, 1961. 166 l.

Efforts to provide education for former slaves by the Freedmen's Bureau and by Reconstruction governments in the cotton states of Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.


Jefferson Davis and "Stonewall" Jackson (Thomas Jonathan Jackson): The Lives and Public Services of Each, with the Military Career and Death of the Latter. Philadelphia: John E. Potter, 1866. 300 pp.

Includes brief biography of the president of the Confederate States of America, written when he was imprisoned and still awaiting trial after the Civil War.


Jenkins, Dan. Confederate and Union Buttons of the Gulf Coast, 1861-1865. Mobile, Ala.: Museum of the City of Mobile, 1983. 58 pp.

Illustrates and describes Civil War uniform buttons, including a small number from Mississippi regiments, excavated on the Gulf Coast.


Jenkins, Marie Goodman. Philadelphia…Church of Six Generations: A History of the Red Banks Presbyterian Church. Holly Springs, Miss.: South Reporter Printing, 1955. 34 pp.

Brief history of the Marshall County church since its organization in 1844; includes humorous vignettes.


Jenkins, Ned. J., and Richard A. Krause. The Tombigbee Watershed in Southeastern Prehistory. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1986. xii, 156 pp.

Archaeological findings pertaining to Native Americans before 1500 near the Tombigbee River in Alabama and Mississippi.


Jenkins, Robert L. "African-Americans on the Natchez Trace." Southern Quarterly 29, no. 4 (Summer 1991): 43-62.

Discussion of the use of the trace for the slave trade, by African American soldiers in the Battle of Brice's Cross Roads (Prentiss/Lee counties), and by William Johnson, the free black barber of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Jenkins, Robert L. "Black Voices in Reconstruction: The Senate Careers of Hiram R. Revels and Blanche K. Bruce." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1975. 161 l.

Careers of the only two African American U.S. senators prior to 1967.


Jenkins, Robert L. "The Development of Black Higher Education in Mississippi (1865-1920)." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 4 (Nov. 1983): 272-86.

Deals with founding, problems, and legacy of Rust College and Mississippi Industrial College in Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), Tougaloo College and Jackson State University (Hinds Co.), and Alcorn State University in Lorman (Jefferson/Claiborne counties).


Jenkins, William Dunbar. "The Cholera in 1849." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1904): 271-79.

Describes the most deadly of the nineteenth-century cholera outbreaks in the state; article hampered by absence of modern scientific knowledge of the causes and effective treatment of the disease.


Jenks, William L. "Territorial Legislation by Governor and Judges." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 5, no. 1 (June 1918): 38-50.

Includes discussion of laws creating and establishing government in the Mississippi Territory, 1789-1801.


Jennings, Jesse D. "Chickasaw and Earlier Indian Cultures of Northeast Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 3, no. 3 (July 1941): 155-226.

Synthesizes archaeological work on Native American cultures along the Natchez Trace both before and after 1500.


Jeter, Marvin D. "The Palmer-Lewis 'Mound Survey' Forays into Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana, 1881-1883." Mississippi Archaeology 25, no. 2 (Dec. 1990): 1-37.

Includes biographical information on English botanical and archaeological field collector Edward Palmer (c. 1830-1911) and African American artist Henry Jackson Lewis (c. 1837-91) of Water Valley (Yalobusha Co.), who surveyed prehistoric mounds in Coahoma, Adams, Washington, and Lincoln counties.


Jobe, Martha McKnight. "Social History of Ante-Bellum Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1930. 81 l.

Deals with slavery, education, religion, health, travel, crime, housing, entertainment, and clothing.


Joel, William, and Jeanette Welford Smith. "Tranquil Methodist Church." Journal of Monroe County History 2 (1976): 32-37.

History of the Wren church.


Johnson, Cary. "Life within the Confederate Lines as Depicted in the War-Time Journal of a Mississippi Girl." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1929. ii, 84 l.

Heavily annotated diary, 1864-65, of Cora White Watson (b. 1843), a young war widow of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.); includes biographical information.


Johnson, Cecil. "The Agrarian Crusade with Special Reference to Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Virginia, 1924. 35 l.

Covers origin of the Populist Party; party leaders and political races, 1894-95; and reasons for the demise of the party by the turn of the century.


Johnson, Cecil. British West Florida, 1763-1783. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1943. ix, 258 pp.

Political and diplomatic history of the territory, which included present-day South Mississippi: based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, Yale University, 1932.


Johnson, Cecil. "The Distribution of Land in British West Florida." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 16, no. 4 (Oct. 1933): 539-53.

Finds that West Florida followed the typical royal colonial pattern of land grants.


Johnson, Cecil. "West Florida Revisited." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 2 (May 1966): 121-32.

Reevaluation of the author's previous assessment (in British West Florida, 1763-1783) of the impermanence of British influence in the region.


Johnson, Charles Ripley. "Railroad Legislation and Building in Mississippi, 1830-1840." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 4 (Oct. 1942): 195-206.

Covers a crucial decade for railroad building; based on the author's master's thesis, "A History of Railroads in Mississippi to 1860," George Peabody College for Teachers, 1932.



Johnson, Christopher S. "Poor Relief in Antebellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 1 (Feb. 1987): 1-21.

Describes the unofficial, localized system of public welfare for whites in Attala and Madison counties that persisted through the Civil War; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Poverty and Dependence in Antebellum Mississippi," University of California, Riverside, 1988.


Johnson, Edward Ratliff. "The Senatorial Career of Robert J. Walker." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1934. iv, 124 l.

Biographical study of Walker (1801-69) emphasizes his involvement with Texas annexation, public land distribution, and state and national treasury issues.


Johnson, Gwen Mills. "Churches and Evangelism in Jackson, Mississippi, 1920l-1929." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 4 (Nov. 1972): 307-29.

Overview of religious life in the decade examines Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, Catholic, and Jewish congregations.


Johnson, Jay K, Patricia K. Galloway, and Walter Belokon. "Historic Chickasaw Settlement Patterns in Lee County, Mississippi: A First Approximation." Mississippi Archaeology 24, no. 2 (Dec. 1989): 45-52.

Finds that Chickasaws in Lee County largely chose to settle in previously unoccupied upland areas.


Johnson, John W. "Biographical Sketches of Judge A.B. Longstreet and Dr. F.A.P. Barnard." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (1912): 122-47.

Sketches of Longstreet (1790-1870), second president of the University of Mississippi, and Barnard (1809-89), third president of the university.


Johnson, Kenneth R. "Legrand Winfield Pearce: A Mississippi Carpetbagger and the Fight for Federal Aid to Education." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 4 (Nov. 1972): 331-56.

Pearce, a New Yorker appointed to represent Mississippi in Congress, 1870-73, introduced an unsuccessful bill to provide federal aid to education through sale of public lands.


Johnson, Michael P. "Smothered Slave Infants: Were Slave Mothers at Fault?" Journal of Southern History 47, no. 4 (Nov. 1981): 493-520.

Analyzes census data from Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia; includes several references to Mississippi slaves and physicians.


Johnson, Michael P. "Work, Culture, and the Slave Community: Slave Occupations in the Cotton Belt in 1860." Labor History 27, no. 3 (Summer 1986): 325-55.

Uses census data to examine work patterns, occupations, and mortality of field hands versus house servants in Mississippi, Georgia, and South Carolina.


Johnson, Mrs. Jemmy Grant. "The University War Hospital." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (1912): 94-106.

Use of University of Mississippi buildings (Barnard Observatory, the Lyceum, the magnetic observatory, the chapel, and residences) in Oxford (Lafayette Co.) as hospitals during the Civil War.


Johnson, Norman K. "Charles D. Fontaine: Politician of the Old South." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1964. ii, 165 l.

Biography of Fontaine (b. 1810) of Pontotoc (Pontotoc Co.), Know-Nothing candidate for governor in 1855.


Johnson, Ruth Loden. "A History of Tupelo." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1951. 111 l.

History of Tupelo (Lee Co.) from its origin as Gum Pond in 1860; includes material on Civil War destruction, natural disasters, and twentieth-century industrial development.


Johnston, Frank. "The Public Services of Senator James Z. George." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 201-26.

Covers George's role in ending Reconstruction and in the Mississippi Constitution of 1890 that disfranchised African American citizens.


Johnston, Frank. "Suffrage and Reconstruction in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 141-244.

Exhaustive chronology of Mississippi actions and reactions in regard to the issue of Negro suffrage, 1865-90.


Johnston, Frank. "The Vicksburg Campaign." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 63-90.

Union effort to control the Mississippi River at Vicksburg (Warren Co.), 1862-63.


Jones, Archer. "Confederate Strategy from Shiloh to Vicksburg." Journal of Mississippi History 24, no. 3 (July 1962): 158-67.

Growth of the departmental system of command, 1862-63; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, University of Virginia, 1958.


Jones, Archer. "Tennessee and Mississippi, Joe Johnston's Strategic Problem." Tennessee Historical Quarterly 18, no. 2 (June 1959): 134-47.

Obstacle and contingencies faced by General Joseph Johnston in defending Mississippi and the trans-Mississippi territory; includes discussion of his use of cavalry, the problem of Vicksburg's (Warren Co.) defense, and federal troop movements.


Jones, Archer. "The Vicksburg Campaign." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 1 (Feb. 1967): 12-27.

Effect of the loss of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) on the Confederate command structure.


Jones, Elaine Elizabeth. "WLBT-TV, 1964-1979: A Case History of Progress?" M.A. thesis, Iowa State University, 1984. ii, 77 l.

Examines programming and personnel changes made in response to complaints and eventual license revocation of the Jackson (Hinds Co.) station by the U.S. Court of Appeals in 1969.


Jones, Evern. "A History and the Growth of the Consolidation of Schools in the State of Mississippi from 1908 to 1928." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1930. 252 l.

Reviews poor conditions in rural schools and the legislation that led to the establishment of county schools in the state.


Jones, Horace Perry. "Southern Opinion on the Crimean War." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 2 (May 1967): 95-117.

Surveys southern attitudes toward the belligerents (especially England and Russia) as reflected in articles and editorials in southern (particularly Mississippi) newspapers, 1853-55.


Jones, J.H. "Evolution in Wilkinson County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 75-85.

Anecdotal essay on the county in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.


Jones, J.H. "Penitentiary Reform in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 111-28.

Details the convict leasing system in the state, 1862-94, the outcry against it that led to its abolition by state constitutional amendment, and the purchase of a large tract of land in Sunflower County to establish Parchman Penitentiary farm.


Jones, James William, II. "An Analytical History of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1982. v, 153 l.

Political wrangling about the project and its funding, 1930s-81.


Jones, John Griffing. A Complete History of Methodism as Connected with the Mississippi Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Nashville, Tenn.: Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1887-1908. 2 vols.

Detailed denominational history, 1799-1845.


Jones, John Junior. "A Historiographical Study of Jefferson Davis." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Missouri-Columbia, 1970. 388 l.

Examination of selected books and articles finds little objectivity and unanimous condemnation of Davis, although recent studies have generally exonerated him from direct blame for Confederate defeat.


Jones, Maurice Milton, Jr. "Mississippi Senators in Foreign Affairs, 1898-1919." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1935. iii, 182 l.

Analyzes votes and speeches of senators Will Sullivan, Hernando Money, Anselm McLaurin, LeRoy Percy, James K. Vardaman, and John Sharp Williams on issues concerning foreign relations, particularly the Spanish-American War, problems in Latin America, trade, immigration, and World War I.


Jones, R.W. "Confederate Cemeteries and Monuments in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 87-119.

Surveys thirty-two counties; appendices list those buried in Confederate cemeteries in Okolona (Chickasaw Co.), Hernando (DeSoto Co.), and Woodville (Wilkinson Co.), as well as those who died at the temporary hospital at the University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Jones, Rev. John G. A Concise History of the Introduction of Protestantism into Mississippi and the Southwest. St. Louis: P.M. Pinckard, 1866. x, 257 pp.

Establishment of Congregationalist, Baptist, Methodist, Episcopal, and Presbyterian churches, primarily in the Natchez District, 1773-1817.


Jones, Ruth Irene. "Ante-bellum Watering Places of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Arkansas." M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1954. 249 l.

Chapter two, "Mississippi," describes coastal resorts in Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson counties and mineral springs resorts in Franklin, Marion, Hinds, Lauderdale, Madison, Adams, Claiborne, Copiah, Tishomingo, Monroe, Marshall, Tippah, and Holmes counties, 1820-60.


Jones, Ruth Irene. "Ante-Bellum Watering Places of the Mississippi Gulf Coast." Journal of Mississippi History 18, no. 4 (Oct. 1956): 268-301.

Covers attractions and accommodations of seven Gulf Coast resorts in Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson counties, where tourists could escape both the heat and the threat of yellow fever.


Jones, W.B. Methodism in the Mississippi Conference. Jackson, Miss.: Hawkins Foundation, Mississippi Conference Historical Society, 1951. xix, 508 pp.

Continues, for the years 1870-95, the history of the conference begun in volumes by John Griffing Jones and J.B. Cain.


Jordan, Daniel P. "Mississippi's Antebellum Congressmen: A Collective Biography." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 2 (May 1976): 157-82.

Personal, professional, political, and socio-economic statistics on fifty-two congressmen and senators; based on the author's master's thesis, "A Statistical Analysis of Mississippi's Ante-Bellum Congressmen," University of Mississippi, 1962.


Jordan, H. Donaldson. "A Politician of Expansion: Robert J. Walker." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 19, no. 3 (Dec. 1932): 362-81.

Controversial life and career of Walker (1801-69), secretary of the treasury, U.S. senator, and governor of Kansas.


Jordan, Lewellyn Lee. "A Biographical Sketch of David L. Cohn." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1963. 127 l.

Life of Cohn (1897-1960) of Greenville (Washington Co.), author of books that depicted life in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta: God Shakes Creation (1935) and Where I Was Born and Raised (1948).


Jordan, Marjorie Waggoner. "Mississippi Methodists and the Division of the Church over Slavery." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1972. 287 l.

Reaction to the division of the Methodist Episcopal Church into northern and southern branches in 1844; suggests that clergymen may not have been controlled by the slaveocracy.


Jordan, Winthrop D., and Sheila L. Skemp, eds. Race and Family in the Colonial South. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1987. xvii, 173 pp.

Includes "Talking with Indians: Interpreters and Diplomacy in French Louisiana," by Patricia Galloway, which reveals the important role of French boys who learned the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Natchez languages.


Jordan, Winthrop D. Tumult and Silence at Second Creek: An Inquiry into a Civil War Slave Conspiracy. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1993. xvii, 391 pp.

Account of a purported slave revolt conspiracy in Adams County in 1861; reprints and analyzes the limited documentation of what may have been one of the last such conspiracies; winner of the Bancroft Prize, the Jules and Frances Landry Award, and the McLemore Prize.


Jorgenson, Ina Lee. "History of the General Retail Sales Tax of the State of Mississippi." M.A. thesis, East Tennessee State University, 1963. 87 l.

Controversy surrounding the introduction of the sales tax under Governor Martin Conner in 1932.

Josselin de Jong, J.P.B. "The Natchez Social System." Proceedings, Twenty-Third International Congress of Americanists (1928): 553-62.

Hypothesizes that the eighteenth-century French observers whose writings underlie modern knowledge of the Natchez Indians misunderstood the meaning of the two major social classes; paper followed by response by John R. Swanton and a rejoinder by de Jong.


Joubert, Paul Edward. "The Effects of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 on Negro Voter Registration in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1969. 45 l.

Demonstrates that federal enforcement of the law has increased registration.


Joyner, Christopher B. "'Music Is My Business': The Professionalization of the Blues Music Industry." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1994. iii, 93 l.

Traces changes in the industry throughout the twentieth century, as more amateur musicians-most of whom came from the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta-chose to earn their livings through their music.


Kamper, Anna Alice. "A Social and Economic History of Antebellum Bolivar County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1942. vi, 124 l.

Early settlement, Native Americans, populations, agriculture, industry, transportation, homes, education, religion, entertainment, and customs.


Kane, Harnett T. Natchez on the Mississippi. N.Y.: Bonanza, 1947. vii, 373 pp.

Undocumented popular history.


Kaufman, Harold F., Lucy W. Cole, David D. Franks, and Mary B. Whitmarsh. "Mississippi Churches: A Half-Century of Change." Mississippi Quarterly 12, no. 3 (Summer 1959): 105-35.

Demographic and geographical study of white churches, 1906-57.


Kay, Donald. "British Influence on Mississippi Municipal Place Names." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 3 (Aug. 1974): 269-72.

Origins of seventy-eight place names.


Keating, Bern. A History of Washington County, Mississippi. Greenville, Miss.: Greenville Junior Auxiliary, 1976. 95 pp.

Heavily illustrated history includes chapters on the Civil War, yellow fever, the Mississippi River, and Greenville's literary reputation.


Keeton, Guy Herbert. "The Theatre in Mississippi from 1840-1870." Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, 1979. 342 l.

Plays and other forms of entertainment (concerts, exhibitions, showboats, and circuses) in Natchez (Adams Co.), Vicksburg (Warren Co.), and Jackson (Hinds Co.); includes information on managers, actors, plays, and programs.


Kell, Patricia A. "The Aristocracy in Late Antebellum Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Lamar University, 1977. 125 l.

Lives of wealthy Mississippians, 1850-60; lengthy appendix lists over one thousand persons worth more than $100,000 and the number of slaves they owned.


Keller, Mark A. "'The Guv'ner Wuz A Writer'-Alexander G. McNutt of Mississippi." Southern Studies 20, no. 4 (Winter 1981): 394-411.

Life of McNutt (c. 1802), contributor of humorous sketches to the New York sporting paper Spirit of the Times.


Keller, Mark A. "Horse Racing Madness in the Old South-The Sporting Epistles of William J. Minor of Natchez (1837-1860)." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 3 (Aug. 1985): 165-85.

Minor wrote seventy-three pieces on horse racing for the New York sporting publication Spirit of the Times.


Kelley, Arthell. "Levee Building and the Settlement of the Yazoo Basin." Southern Quarterly 1, no. 4 (July 1963): 285-308.

Settlement patterns and history of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, 1817-1927.


Kelley, Arthell, and Robert Spillman. "Sequence Occupancy of the Piney Woods of Southeastern Mississippi, 1805-1976." Mississippi Geographer 4, no. 1 (Spring 1976): 25-42.

Differentiates four distinct settlement periods: 1699-1865, 1865-90, 1890-1930, and 1930-76.


Kelley, Arthell. "Sequence Occupancy of the Yazoo Basin, Mississippi: 1830-1976." Mississippi Geographer 6, no. 1 (Spring 1978): 3-18.

Differentiates four settlement periods: private levee building and slave plantations, 1830-60; title transfers and levee board, 1860-1900; federal assistance, railroads, and land speculation, 1900-1930; and population shifts and land use changes, 1930-76; includes maps and charts.


Kelley, Arthell. "Small Farm Land Tenure in the Yazoo Basin." Mississippi Geographer 3, no. 1 (Spring 1975): 37-42.

Discusses the Sunflower Plantation Project of 1953-73, which attempted to preserve small farms in the face of increasing consolidation into large plantations.


Kelley, Arthell. "Some Aspects of the Geography of the Yazoo Basin, Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Nebraska, 1954. 273 l.

Influences on land usage patterns and population composition.


Kelley, Arthell. "Sullivan-Kilrain Fight, Richburg, Mississippi, July 8, 1889." Southern Quarterly 8, no. 2 (Jan. 1970): 135-44.

Last known bare-knuckle championship fight (Marion Co.), in which John L. Sullivan of Massachusetts was declared world champion after seventy-five rounds.


Kelley, Donald Brooks. "Deep South Dilemma: The Mississippi Press in the Presidential Election of 1928." Journal of Mississippi History 25, no. 2 (Apr. 1963): 63-92.

Surveys reactions of state newspapers to Democrat Al Smith and Republican Herbert Hoover; focuses on the issue of religion.


Kelley, Donald Brooks. "Harper's Ferry: Prelude to Crisis in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 4 (Nov. 1965): 351-72.

Newspaper reaction in Mississippi to John Brown's raid on the U.S. arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, October 16-18, 1859.


Kelley, Donald B. "Intellectual Isolation: Gateway to Secession in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 1 (Feb. 1974): 17-37.

Argues that growing intellectual isolation characterized by exile of dissenters and northern schoolteachers, suppression of free-soil publications, and recall of southern students from northern schools contributed to sectional estrangement, 1859-61.


Kelley, Donald Brooks. "Mississippi and 'The Splendid Little War' of 1898." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 2 (May 1964): 123-34.

Reaction to the destruction of the Maine, enthusiasm for war, recruitment of soldiers, and the Spanish-American War's effect on the state.


Kelley, Donald Brooks. "Mississippi Public Opinion in the Presidential Elections of 1928 and 1960: A Study in the Continuity of Ideas." Ph.D. dissertation, Tulane University, 1965. vi, 231 l.

Traces the beginning of the South's disaffection with the Democratic Party to the 1928 election, in which Mississippians failed to give full support to Alfred E. Smith, and demonstrates a similar reaction a generation later in 1960 to the candidacy of John F. Kennedy.


Kelley, Donald Brooks. "Of God, Liquor and Politics: The Mississippi Press in the Presidential Election of 1928." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1962. 136 l.

Democrats were ambivalent over Alfred E. Smith's candidacy, but proponents of white supremacy through Democratic Party dominance won out over opponents of Smith's Catholicism and acceptance of legal liquor.


Kelly, James R., Jr. "The Confederate Ironclad Program and the Defense of the West." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1993. iv, 147 l.

Includes information about the C.S.S. Arkansas, sunk near Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1862.


Kelton, Paul Timothy. "Not All Disappeared: Disease and Southeastern Indian Survival, 1500-1800." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oklahoma, 1998. 398 l.

Examines how and why the Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, and Chickasaws survived epidemics better than some other Native American tribes.


Kempe, Helen Kerr. The Pelican Guide to Old Homes in Mississippi. Gretna, La.: Pelican, 1977. 2 vols.

Brief histories and some photographs of historic structures in Woodville (Wilkinson Co.), Natchez (Adams Co.), Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.), Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Canton (Madison Co.), Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.), Jackson (Hinds Co.), Hattiesburg (Forrest Co.), Meridian (Lauderdale Co.), the Gulf Coast (Jackson, Harrison, and Hancock counties), Macon (Noxubee Co.), Columbus (Lowndes Co.), Starkville (Oktibbeha Co.), Aberdeen (Monroe Co.), Corinth (Alcorn Co.), Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), Oxford (Lafayette Co.), Sardis and Como (Panola Co.), Grenada (Grenada Co.), Carrollton (Carroll Co.), Greenville (Washington Co.), and Coahoma County.


Kendel, Julia. "Reconstruction in Lafayette County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 13 (1913): 223-71.

Covers politics, government, economy, schools, and religion, and includes anecdotal material about Ku Klux Klan activity; appendices list county officials and statistics on slavery, population, agriculture, manufacturing, taxation, illiteracy, and churches.


Kennedy, John F. Profiles in Courage. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1955. xix, 266 pp.

Chapter seven, "'Today I must be true or false…'" Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar," praises Lamar's conciliatory 1874 eulogy in Congress for his former enemy Charles Sumner, his role in the Compromise of 1877, and his opposition to the free coinage of silver.


Kennedy, Larry Wells. "The Fighting Preacher of the Army of Tennessee: General Mark Perrin Lowry." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1976. 206 l.

Biography of Lowry (1828-83), Confederate general, president of the Mississippi Baptist Convention, and founder of Blue Mountain Female College (Tippah Co.).


Kennedy, Larry Wells. "The History of the Mount Pleasant Baptist Church, Webster County, Mississippi, 1850-1957." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1970. 107 l.

Institutional history of the church, which disbanded in 1957.


Kent, Ronald C., et al, eds. Culture, Gender, Race, and U.S. Labor History. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1993. xv, 215 pp.

Includes "The History and Legacy of Mississippi Plantation Labor," by Elizabeth Ann Sharpe, which examines the transition from slave to wage labor on Mississippi plantations after the Civil War.


Kerr, Norwood Allen. "The Mississippi Colonization Society (1831-1860)." Journal of Mississippi History 43, no. 1 (Feb. 1981): 1-30.

Activities of the Mississippi branch of the American Colonization Society, founded in 1831 to repatriate slaves to Africa and headed by Stephen Duncan of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Kethley, William Marion. "A Brief History of Delta State College." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 3 (July 1957): 173-84.

History of the Cleveland (Bolivar Co.) school, 1924-57.


Key, V.O., Jr. Southern Politics in State and Nation. N.Y.: Knopf, 1949. xxvi, 675 pp., xiv.

Includes chapter "Mississippi: The Delta and the Hills," which explores long-standing Democratic factionalism by examining voting in senatorial and gubernatorial contests of the 1930s and 1940s.


Kidder, Tristram R. "The Koroa Indians of the Lower Mississippi Valley." Mississippi Archaeology 23, no. 2 (Dec. 1988): 1-42.

Reviews what little is known of the Koroa, who lived in what is now West-Central Mississippi and in parts of Arkansas and Louisiana in the late prehistoric and early historic periods.


Kidwell, Clara, and Charles Roberts. The Choctaws: A Critical Bibliography. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980. Bibliographical Series, Newberry Library for the History of the American Indian. xiii, 110 pp.

Includes maps, bibliography, and bibliographical essay.


Kidwell, Clara Sue. Choctaws and Missionaries in Mississippi, 1818-1918. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1995. xvi, 271 pp.

Activities of Congregationalist and Presbyterian clergymen of the early 1800s who encouraged Choctaw acculturation to European customs, and of Baptist, Methodist, and Catholic missionaries of the late 1800s and early 1900s who encouraged the Choctaws to retain their traditional culture.


Kight, Lawrence Edward. "'The State Is on Trial': Governor Edmund F. Noel and the Defense of Mississippi's Legal Institutions Against Mob Violence." Journal of Mississippi History 60, no. 3 (Fall 1998): 191-222.

Noel used the state militia to prevent the lynching of Will Mack in 1908; based on the author's master's thesis, "Mississippi Justice: The Trial and Execution of Will Mack," University of Southern Mississippi, 1997.


Killebrew, James Raiford. "Development of the Railroads of Mississippi before 1861." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1927. 62 l.

Early histories of the West Feliciana, Mississippi and Tennessee, Mobile and Ohio, and Mississippi Central Railroads.


Kimsey, Donald R. "The Presbyterian Church in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1963. viii, 129 l.

Denominational history, 1800-61.


Kinchen, Oscar A. Women Who Spied for the Blue and the Gray. Philadelphia: Dorrance, 1972. ix, 165 pp.

Describes "Resourceful Kate" (Kate Jones Thompson) of Lafayette County, who smuggled a Confederate document across Union lines to her husband Jacob in Canada in 1864.


King, J. Crawford, Jr. "The Closing of the Southern Range: An Exploratory Study." Journal of Southern History 43, no. 1 (Feb. 1982): 53-70.

Connects the end of the open range in Alabama and Mississippi with profound social, economic, and political changes.


Kinnaird, Lawrence, and Lucia B. Kinnaird. "Nogales: Strategic Post on the Spanish Frontier." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no.1 (Feb. 1980): 1-16.

Fort Nogales, built in 1792 by the Spanish on the future site of the town of Vicksburg (Warren Co.), was valued by the Spanish for its strategic location.


Kinsella, Dorothy C. "Southern Apologists: A Liberal Image." Ph.D. dissertation, St. Louis University, 1971. 398 l.

Describes "image and vision" of three southern journalists, including Hodding Carter of the Greenville (Washington Co.) Delta Democrat-Times, and examines the complexities of their "middle of the road" positions on race.


Kirby, Jack Temple. "The Transformation of Southern Plantations c. 1920-1960." Agricultural History 57, no. 3 (July 1983): 257-76.

Socio-economic forces that led to the destruction of the old plantation economy and the emergence of modern neoplantations; mentions Delta and Pine Land Company of Scott (Bolivar Co.) and Tate County plantations.


Kirwan, Albert D. "Apportionment in the Mississippi Constitution of 1890." Journal of Southern History 14, no. 2 (May 1948): 234-46.

Analysis of impediments faced by legislators in their attempt to disfranchise African American voters in the constitutional convention of 1890.


Kirwan, Albert D. Revolt of the Rednecks: Mississippi Politics, 1876-1925. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1951. x, 328 pp.

Political history of the period emphasizes the role of sectional and class conflicts in the rise of racial demagogues James K. Vardaman and Theodore G. Bilbo; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "A History of Mississippi Politics, 1876-1925," Duke University, 1947.


Kitchens, Ben Earl. Gunboats and Cavalry: A History of Eastport, Mississippi: with Special Emphasis on Events of the War Between the States. Florence, Ala.: Thornwood, 1985. vii, 227 pp.

Eastport was a Tishomingo County town on the Tennessee River before the river was dammed to form Pickwick Lake; book includes information on Native Americans, white settlers, floods, boats, yellow fever, the Civil War, and the formation of the reservoir.


Kitchens, Ben Earl. Rosecrans Meets Price: The Battle of Iuka, Mississippi. Florence, Ala.: Thornwood, 1987. vi, 234 pp.

Detailed account of the 1862 Civil War battle in Tishomingo County.


Kitchens, Mary H., and Theresa Blackledge, eds. A Mini-Confederacy: The Free State of Jones, 1862-186-: A Source Book. Ellisville, Miss.: Progress-Item, 1971. 112 pp.

Collection of secondary literature, some previously unpublished, about the legend of Jones County's secession from the Confederate States of America.


Klaas, Edward Joseph, II. Gluckstadt, Madison County, Mississippi: A History of a German-American Catholic Farming Community in the Deep South. Baltimore, Md.: Gateway, 1995. xiv, 240 pp.

Study of a group of German-American families relocated to Madison County at the turn of the century; includes genealogical tables.


Klandermans, Bert, ed. Organizing for Change: Social Movement Organizations in Europe and the United States. Greenwich, Conn.: JAI, 1989. International Social Movement Research: A Research Annual, 2. xi, 442 pp.

Includes "Multiorganizational Fields and Recruitment to Social Movements," by Roberto M. Fernandez and Doug McAdam, an analysis of socio-economic characteristics of Freedom Summer volunteers.


Kling, Susan. Fannie Lou Hamer: A Biography. Chicago: Women for Racial and Economic Equality, 1979. 56 pp.

Brief biography of the civil rights activist (1917-77) from Sunflower County.


Klingberg, FrankWysor. "The Case of the Minors: A Unionist Family within the Confederacy." Journal of Southern History 13, no. 1 (Feb. 1947): 27-45.

Lives and activities of the family of Union sympathizer Catherine Minor, who inherited Palo Alto and Carthage plantations near Natchez (Adams Co.) in 1850.


Knapp, David, Jr. "The Rodney Church Incident." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 3 (Aug. 1970): 245-49.

Capture of Walter E.H. Fentress, commander of the Union gunboat Rattler, while he was attending church in Jefferson County on September 13, 1863.


Kneebone, John T. "Liberal on the Levee: Hodding Carter, 1944-1954." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 2 (May 1987): 153-62.

During the decade preceding the Brown decision, Carter, editor of the Greenville (Washington Co.) Delta Democrat-Times, wrote moderate editorials on race relations.


Kneebone, John T. Southern Liberal Journalists and the Issue of Race, 1920-1944. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985. xx, 312 pp.

Finds a similar commitment to gradualism in racial reform in the writings of five liberal journalists of the interwar period, including Hodding Carter (1907-72) of Greenville (Washington Co.), editor of the Delta Democrat-Times; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Race, Reform, and History: Southern Liberal Journalists, 1920-1940," University of Virginia, 1981.


Knight, Landon. The Real Jefferson Davis. Battle Creek, Mich.: Pilgrim Magazine, 1904. 203 pp.

Early undocumented biography.


Kobrin, Thomas Barstow. "Position or Annihilation: A Reexamination of Ulysses S. Grant's Military Strategy During the Vicksburg Campaign." M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina, 1988. iii, 47 l.

Argues that Grant's strategy at Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1863 was not innovative but instead reflected traditional military practices of the day.


Kondert, Nancy T. "The Romance and Reality of Defeat: Southern Women in 1865." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 2 (May 1973): 141-52.

Analyzes reactions to defeat as revealed in eleven published diaries and a letter.


Korn, Jerry, and the editors of Time-Life Books. War on the Mississippi: Grant's Vicksburg Campaign. Alexandria, Va.: Time-Life Books, 1985. The Civil War, no. 12. 175 pp.

Heavily illustrated popular history of the year-long campaign to control the Warren County city, 1862-63.


Kosciusko-Attala Historical Society. Kosciusko-Attala History. N.p., 1976. 314 pp.

Includes material on Native Americans, schools, clubs, churches, historic houses, and citizens.


Kott, Eileen, William Warren Rogers, and Robert David Ward. "Oscar Wilde in Vicksburg, at Beauvoir, and Other Southern Stops." Journal of Mississippi History 59, no. 3 (Fall 1997): 183-210.

Southern and Mississippi reaction to Irish writer Wilde's 1882 American lecture tour.


Kousser, J. Morgan, and James M. McPherson, eds. Region, Race and Reconstruction: Essays in Honor of C. Vann Woodward. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1982. xxxvii, 463 pp.

Includes "Modernizing Southern Slavery: The Proslavery Argument Reinterpreted," by Bertram Wyatt-Brown, which examines proslavery thought in the Old South through the writings of Henry Hughes of Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.) and others.


Kousser, J. Morgan. The Shaping of Southern Politics: Suffrage Restriction and the Establishment of the One-Party South, 1880-1910. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1974. xvii, 319 pp.

"Mississippi: 'Proper Patriotism,'" in chapter six describes and briefly analyzes the disfranchising constitutional convention of 1890.


Kraft, Katherine A. "European Refugees in Mississippi, 1942-1952." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1980. 141 l.

Experiences of three to four thousand political refugees, most of whom resided in the state only temporarily.


Krane, Dale, and Stephen D. Shaffer. Mississippi Government and Politics: Modernizers versus Traditionalists. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1992. Politics and Governments of American States series. xx, 367 pp.

Includes "The Origins and Evolution of a Traditionalistic Society," "Tradition versus Modernity in Mississippi Politics," and "Sources for Research on Mississippi Politics," by Stephen D. Shaffer and Dale Krane, and "The Enduring Traditions of the State Constitutions," by Tip H. Allen, Jr.


Krause, Bonnie. "The Mary Buie Museum, Oxford, Mississippi, as a WPA Community Art Center, 1939-1942." Journal of Mississippi History 60, no. 3 (Fall 1998): 241-54.

Brief existence of the Oxford Art Gallery, which mounted exhibits and offered art education classes to the community.


Kresge, Jeffery Richard. "Manpower Mobilization in Mississippi During the First World War." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1986. iv, 128 l.

Deals with preparedness, the draft, mobilization for war, and the conflict over neutrality between U.S. senators John Sharp Williams and James K. Vardaman


Kubassek, Melody. "Ask Us Not to Forget: The Lost Cause in Natchez, Mississippi." Southern Studies 3, no. 3 (new series, Fall 1992): 155-70.

Examines manifestations of the Lost Cause myth, especially in the 1890s.


Kutler, Stanley I. "Ex Parte McCardle: Judicial Impotency? The Supreme Court and Reconstruction Reconsidered." American Historical Review 54, no. 3 (Dec. 1967): 835-51.

Based on analysis of the McCardle (1868) and Yerger (1869) cases, which were habeas corpus cases originating in Mississippi; argues that the Reconstruction-era Court differed little in power and status from that of the later nineteenth century.


Kwachlea, Patricia B., ed. Perspectives on the Southeast: Linguistics, Archaeology, and Ethnohistory. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994. Southern Anthropological Society Proceedings, no. 27. x, 166 pp.

Includes "Where Did the Choctaw Come From? An Examination of Pottery in the Areas Adjacent to the Choctaw Homeland," by Kenneth H. Carleton.


Kyker, Rex Paxton. "William Winans: Minister and Politician of the Old South. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Florida, 1957. viii, 326 l.

Biography of Methodist clergyman Winans (1788-1857).


Kyle, John W. "Reconstruction in Panola County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 13 (1913): 9-98.

Covers early history, politics, federal troops, Freedmen's Bureau, Loyal League, Ku Klux Klan, judiciary, churches, economy, and schools; appendix includes statistics on slavery.


Kynerd, Byrle Acker. "The Work of and Reaction to the Committee of Fifteen in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1966. iv, 105 l.

Public reaction in Mississippi to the work of the congressional committee on Reconstruction.


Lacey, Nannie. "Reconstruction in Leake County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 271-89.

Undergraduate thesis, University of Mississippi, 1910; covers early history, government, politics, Ku Klux Klan, Loyal League, Freedmen's Bureau, schools, religion, and economy; includes statistics on slavery.


Lackey, Richard Stephen. "Credit Land Sales, 1811-1815: Mississippi Entries East of the Pearl." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1975. 222 l.

Data on federal land disposal.


Lackey, Richard S. "Petition to the Legislative Council by Inhabitants Living on the Chickasawhay River, 1808." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 3 (Aug. 1975): 279-82.

Eighty-eight petition signatories, who were early settlers of Wayne and Greene counties.


Ladner, Heber. "James Kimble Vardaman, Governor of Mississippi, 1904-1908." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 4 (Oct. 1940): 175-205.

Covers the race for governor, Vardaman's accomplishments in office, and the 1907 U.S. Senate race; based on the author's master's thesis, "James Kimble Vardaman in Mississippi Politics," Duke University, 1938.


Lagrone, C.M. An Index to J.F.H. Claiborne's "Mississippi, as a Province, Territory and State." Hattiesburg, Miss.: Book Farm, 1939. 39 pp.

Reprints the author's master's thesis, "An Index to Claiborne's History of Mississippi," University of Mississippi, 1928, which provides a proper name index to Claiborne's unfinished history (1880).


Laist, Theodore. "Two Early Mississippi Valley State Capitols." Western Architect 35 (May 1926): 53-58.

History of the "old" Mississippi State Capitol in Jackson (Hinds Co.) includes interior photographs taken decades prior to the 1959-61 restoration.


Lake, L. "Grenada and Neighboring Towns in the 30's." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 313-16.

Persons and events of the 1830s in Hendersonville, Coffeeville, and Grenada in Yalobusha and Grenada counties.


Lamar, Curt, ed. History of Rosedale, Mississippi, 1876-1976. Spartanburg, S.C.: Reprint Co., for the Rosedale Bicentennial Committee, 1976. xi, 131 pp.

American bicentennial history of the Bolivar County community.


Lamar Rifles: A History of Company G, Eleventh Mississippi Regiment, C.S.A. Roanoke, Va.: Stone Printing, [1902?]. 93 pp.

History of the Confederate company from Lafayette County; includes roster and biographical information.


Lamis, Alexander P., ed. Southern Politics in the 1990s. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1999. xv, 490 pp.

Includes essay on Mississippi by political columnist Bill Minor.


Lamis, Alexander P. The Two-Party South. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1984. x, 317 pp.

Chapter four, "Mississippi: It's All Black and White," deals with the reasons for the Republican upsurge in the state in the 1960s-70s; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Southern Two-Party Politics: Dynamics of Electoral Competition in the South Since the Early 1960's," Vanderbilt University, 1982.


Lampkin, Robert Hinkle. "The Contribution Made by the Security State Bank of Starkville to the Economy of Oktibbeha County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1960. 78 l.

Historical and financial study, 1898-1960.


Lancaster, Jane Fairchild. "A Resume: The First Three Chapters of 'Hamilton: Take Your Place in History as the First County Seat of Monroe.'" Journal of Monroe County History 2 (1976): 13-15.

Brief history of the town, 1821-61.


Land, Guy Paul. "Mississippi Republicanism and the 1960 Presidential Election." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 1 (Feb. 1978): 33-48.

Traces the beginning of the breakdown of the single-party system back to 1960, when Republicans took advantage of the factionalization of the Democratic Party and portrayed their own platform as more in line with Mississippi values.


Landon, Michael de L. The Honor and Dignity of the Profession: A History of the Mississippi State Bar, 1906-1976. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1979. xi, 195 pp.

History of the third, and current, state bar association since its establishment; includes list of presidents.


Landon, Michael de L. "The Mississippi State Bar Association, 1821-1825: The First in the Nation." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 3 (Aug. 1980): 222-42.

History of the first formally incorporated state bar association, which focused on uniformity of fees, establishment of bar admission policy, and improvement of the state judiciary.


Landry, David. "A Socio-Economic View of Politics in Mississippi." Southern Quarterly 8, no. 3 (Apr. 1975): 217-28.

Argues that attitudes toward race have determined voting patterns since World War II and that the state's conservatism is based on a diagonal linkage of socially liberal and economically conservative upper classes and socially conservative and economically liberal lower classes.


Lane, Mills. Architecture of the Old South: Mississippi and Alabama. N.Y.: Abbeville, 1989. 204 pp.

Includes photographs and descriptions of major and minor antebellum structures; organized by architectural style.


Lang, Herbert H. "J.F.H. Claiborne at 'Laurel Wood' Plantation, 1853-1870." Journal of Mississippi History 18, no. 1 (Jan. 1956): 1-17.

Historian Claiborne grew cotton on his Hancock County plantation and also worked as a timber agent.


Lang, Herbert Howard. "Nineteenth Century Historians of the Gulf States." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1954. v, 311 l.

Includes chapters on Mississippians John W. Monette and J.F.H. Claiborne.


Lang, John H. History of Harrison County, Mississippi. Gulfport, Miss.: Dixie, 1936. viii, 303 pp.

Narrative history and biographical sketches interspersed with military rosters, vital statistics, and lists of county officials; at least one-third of the volume devoted to the author's reminiscences and letters.


Lang, Marvel. "The Development of Small Towns as a Settlement Process in Mississippi: A Case Study." Mississippi Geographer 9, no. 1 (Spring 1981): 5-14.

Settlement of Jasper County in three periods: 1833-60, 1870-1900, and 1900 to the present.


Lang, Marvel. "Population Trends in Jasper County, Mississippi, 1833-1970: A Historical Geographical Perspective." Journal of Mississippi History 43, no. 4 (Nov. 1981): 294-308.

Analyzes population changes with emphasis on outmigration and racial distribution.


Lang, Meredith. Defender of the Faith: The High Court of Mississippi, 1817-1875. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1977. viii, 176 pp.

Reviews decisions of the Mississippi Supreme Court on issues of constitutional law, slavery, and Reconstruction; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation (under the name Irma Mae Lang), "Defender of the Faith: A Study of the Opinions of the High Court of Mississippi, 1817-1875," Harvard University, 1972.


Lanza, Michael L. Agrarianism and Reconstruction Politics: The Southern Homestead Act. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1990. x, 153 pp.

Failure of the Southern Homestead Act of 1866 to provide small farms to newly-freed slaves; appendix A, "Sampling Mississippi Homesteaders," examines a percentage of homestead applications.


Larson, Allan Louis. "Southern Demagogues: A Study in Charismatic Leadership." Ph.D. dissertation, Northwestern University, 1964. vi, 405 l.

Chapter four, "Eugene Talmadge and Theodore G. Bilbo: The Politics of Xenophobia and White Supremacy," argues that Bilbo appealed to the nativism and racism of many Mississippi voters even though he faced nearly universal editorial opposition in the state's newspapers.


Lash, Jeffrey N. "Joseph E. Johnston's Grenada Blunder: A Failure in Command." Civil War History 23, no. 2 (June 1977): 114-28.

Discusses failure of the Confederate general to repair Mississippi railroads in the summer of 1863, which resulted in costly losses of rolling stock and equipment located at Grenada (Grenada Co.).


Lash, Jeffrey N. "Major George Whitfield and Confederate Railway Policy (1863-1865)." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 3 (Aug. 1980): 172-93.

Argues that Whitfield recognized the importance of railroads to the war efforts and worked successfully with railroad companies.


Lassett, George Walton. "The History of Baptists in Hinds County." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1954. v, 141 l.

Denominational history since the antebellum era including information on individual congregations and the establishment of Mississippi College and other Baptist schools.


Lassiter, Ethel Minett. "A History of the Mississippi Baptist Seminary, 1942-1989." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1989. 269 l.

History of the first African American seminary in the state, which was located first in Prentiss (Jefferson Davis Co.), then in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Lasswell, Lynda Jane. "The First Regiment of Mississippi Infantry in the Mexican War and Letters of Jefferson Davis Concerning the War." M.A. thesis, Rice University, 1969. ii, 228 l.

Narrative (part one) covers formation of the Mississippi Rifles; letters (part two) were also published in volume two of the Papers of Jefferson Davis.


"The Last Public Execution in Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 4 (Dec. 1977): 7-8.

Si Connor, an African American, was executed in 1907 for the murder of his wife.


Latham, Robert Cicero. "The Dirt Farmer in Politics: A Study of Webster County, Mississippi, during the Rise of Democratic Factionalism, 1880-1910." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1951. 89 l.

Agrarian protest, especially the activities of the Greenback, Populist, and Independent parties, the Great Agricultural Relief, and the Farmers' Alliance.


Lavin, Michael Terrence. "The Dixiecrat Movement of 1948." M.A. thesis, College of William and Mary, 1972. vii, 126 l.

Tests the thesis that conflict within the Democratic Party over civil rights in the 1930s and 1940s led eventually to the States' Rights Party split.


Lawson, James Ross. The History of Smith County, Mississippi. N.p., 1935. 421 pp.

History since 1833, including antebellum life, folklore, Sullivan's Hollow, natural history, agriculture, and industry; revised edition (1978), which does not credit Lawson as author, also includes brief histories of fifteen communities.


Lawson, Stephen F. In Pursuit of Power: Southern Blacks and Electoral Politics, 1965-1982. N.Y.: Columbia University Press, 1985. Contemporary American History series. xix, 391 pp.

Enforcement of the 1965 Voting Rights Act in the South; much of the volume deals with Mississippi, especially chapter three, "The Land of the Tree and the Home of the Grave."


Lea, Emma Lane. "The Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians: A Geographic Study." M.A. thesis, George Peabody College for Teachers, 1934. x, 112 l.

Evaluates extent of cultural change resulting from contact with white settlers.


Leavell, Z.T. "The Ante-Bellum Historical Society of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 227-37.

Genesis of the first historical society in the state, 1858; includes constitution of the organization, first address by the founders, and the incorporating act of the legislature.


Leavell, Z.T., and T.J. Bailey. A Complete History of the Mississippi Baptists from the Earliest Times. Jackson, Miss.: Mississippi Baptist, 1904. 2 vols.

Detailed history organized by associations, schools and colleges, conventions, and benevolences.


Leavell, Z.T. "Early Beginnings of Baptists in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 245-53.

Based largely on minutes (1791-1815) of Coles Creek Church (Adams Co.), the first Baptist church in the state.


Lee, Charles Robert, Jr. "The Confederate Constitutions." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina, 1961. 292 l.

Includes the role of Mississippi delegates at the Montgomery constitutional conventions.


Lee, Chana Kai. "A Passionate Pursuit of Justice: The Life and Leadership of Fannie Lou Hamer." Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 1993. 499 l.

Emphasizes the personal toll exacted on Hamer by poverty, family tragedy, and her own civil rights activism.


Lee, Gerald Douglas. "The Role of the Pulp and Paper Industry in the Economy of Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1973. 219 l.

Includes history of the industry since its beginning in 1913 at Moss Point (Jackson Co.).


Lee, Jeon. "The Historical Geography of Rice Culture in the American South." Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, 1988. 237 l.

Rice cultivation in the South since the antebellum period, including economic, technological, agricultural, and political developments that affected rice culture and moved its center from the Atlantic coast to the lower Mississippi River valley.


Lee, Robbie Sue. "James P. Coleman and the Politics of Race." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1972. 83, [iii] l.

Covers Coleman's (b. 1914) career as attorney general, governor, and U.S. Circuit Court judge; maintains that as governor his moderate stance on race "served as a legal buffer between the federal government and white Mississippians."


Leftwich, George J. "Colonel George Strother Gaines and Other Pioneers in Mississippi Territory." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1 (Centenary Series, 1916): 442-56.

Vignettes of the life of Gaines (1783-1872), including his establishment of Gaines Trace and his involvement in the removal of Native Americans.


Leftwich, George J. "Cotton Gin Port and Gaines' Trace." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 263-70.

History of Cotton Gin Port (Monroe Co.), an abandoned town on the Tombigbee River, and of Gaines Trace, the trail that crossed the river near the town.


Leftwich, George J. "Henry Lowndes Muldrow." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 269-78.

Biographical sketch of Muldrow (1837-1905) of Lowndes County, president Grover Cleveland's first assistant secretary of the interior.


Leftwich, George J. "Reconstruction in Monroe County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 53-84.

Criticizes carpetbaggers and freedmen appointed to county offices, describes actions of the Ku Klux Klan, details the test case (Ex parte Walton) of the Anti-Ku Klux Klan Act, and describes the campaign and election of 1876.


Leftwich, George J. "Robert J. Walker." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 359-71.

Biographical sketch of Walker (1801-69), U.S. senator from Mississippi, governor of Kansas, and U.S. attorney general in the Polk administration.


Leftwich, George J. "Some Main Travelled Roads Including Cross Sections of the Natchez Trace." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1 (Centenary Series, 1916): 463-76.

Significance of the Natchez Trace, Gaines Trace, and Jackson's Military Road in the early settlement of Mississippi; includes maps.


Leftwich, William Groom, Jr. "The Battle of Brice's Cross Roads." West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 20 (1966): 5-19.

Troop movements and strategy of General Nathan Bedford Forrest in achieving victory for the Confederates in the Lee/Prentiss County battle of June, 1864.


Legan, Marshall Scott. "The Disappearance of Bronze John in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 1 (Feb. 1976): 33-46.

Last yellow fever epidemic in Mississippi (1905), medical research on the disease, and the economic, political, and social implications of its eradication.


Legan, Marshall Scott. "The Evolution of Public Health Services in Mississippi, 1865-1910." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1968. 204 l.

Development of the State Board of Health; emphasizes yellow fever but deals with other diseases as well.


Legan, Marshall Scott. "Mississippi and the Yellow Fever Epidemics of 1878-1879." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 3 (Aug. 1971): 199-217.

Epidemics in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Grenada (Grenada Co.), and Holly Springs (Marshall Co.).


Legan, Marshall Scott. "The War of the Waters: The Louisiana-Mississippi Quarantine War of 1905." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 2 (May 1988): 89-110.

Absence of federal quarantine controls during the South's last yellow fever epidemic contributed to conflicts between the states in their efforts to contain the infection.


Lemann, Nicholas. The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America. N.Y.: Knopf, 1991. 410 pp.

Follows the lives of several African Americans who migrated to Chicago; describes the genesis of the sharecropping system and the mechanization of cotton cultivation that led to the largest migration in American history, 1917-70; and comments on the state of race relations and economic progress for African Americans in present-day Clarksdale (Coahoma Co.) in the wake of federal anti-poverty programs.


Lemly, James Hutton. The Gulf, Mobile and Ohio: A Railroad That Had to Expand or Expire. Homewood, Ill.: Richard D. Irwin, 1953. Indiana School of Business, study no. 36. viii, 347 pp.

Business history, 1920-52, of the rail system, which runs north from Mobile through East Mississippi.


Lemmer, George F. "Early Agricultural Editors and Their Farm Philosophies." Agricultural History 31, no. 4 (Oct. 1957): 3-22.

Hinds County planter Martin W. Philips (d. 1889) practiced diversified farming and edited several farming publications, including the Southern Cultivator.


Lenoir, James J. "An Economic History of Mississippi During the Civil War." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1929. 76 l.

Concentrates on scarcity of food and salt and the effect of the war on transportation; also deals with banking, manufacturing, slaves as property, and prices paid for various commodities.


Lepre, Brother Jerome, S.C. "The Indian Connection Among Gulf Coast Families." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 4 (Nov. 1980): 362-76.

Finds that eighteenth-century ancestors of several Gulf Coast families of French descent (Moran, Ladner, Lafontaine) married coastal Indians.


Lesseig, Corey T. "'Out of the Mud': The Good Roads Crusade and Social Change in Twentieth-Century Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 60, no. 1 (Spring 1998): 51-72.

First two decades, 1919-39, of highway construction and maintenance; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Automobility and Social Change in the American South: Mississippi, 1909-39," University of Mississippi, 1997, which also includes chapters on the automobile sales and service industry and the automobile's relationship to educational reform, recreation, and race relations.


Lever, Webbie Jackson. "The Agrarian Movement in Noxubee County." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1952. 98 l.

Examines agrarian protest, 18702-90s, especially activities of the Greenback and Populist parties, the Grange, and the Farmers' Alliance.


Leverett, Rudy H. Legend of the Free State of Jones. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984. xii, 131 pp.

Explains the basis for the legend, which held that Jones County seceded from the Confederate States of America in 1864; in truth, an organization of Confederate deserters led by Newton Knight in southern Jones and northern Perry counties terrorized the area and claimed to be Union sympathizers.


Leverich, Lyle. Tom: The Unknown Tennessee Williams. N.Y.: Crown, 1995. xxvi, 644 pp.

Biography of playwright Thomas Lanier Williams (1911-83), who was born in Columbus (Lowndes Co.).


Levy, Claude. "Jefferson Davis as Secretary of War." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1946. vi, 237 l.

Evaluates Davis's administrative performance as secretary of war in the Franklin Pierce cabinet, 1853-57.


Lewis, Anna. Pushmataha, American Patriot: The Story of the Choctaws' Struggle for Survival. N.Y.: Exposition, 1959. [ix], 204 pp.

Undocumented life-and-times biography of the Choctaw chief (1764-1824) who signed the Treaty of Doak's Stand.


Lewis, Freda Darlene. "The Jackson Advocate: The Rise and Eclipse of a Leading Black Newspaper in Mississippi, 1939-1964." M.A. thesis, Iowa State University, 1984. 81 l.

Biographical study of conservative editor Percy Greene (1898-1977).


Lewis, Jan Hendrick. "Mississippi's Experiments in Biracial Politics, 1960-1973: A Challenge to White Supremacy." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1974. 161 l.

Strategies employed to integrate the Democratic and Republican primaries.


Lewis, Jon Richard. "Progressivism Revisited: A Reevaluation of Mississippi Politics, 1920-1930." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1977. 118 l.

Characterizes Mississippi in the 1920s as progressive, reforming, and populist.


Lewis, Monte Ross. "Chickasaw Removal: Betrayal of the Beloved Warriors, 1794-1844." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Texas, 1981. 298 l.

History of the removal of the Chickasaw Indians from their homelands in the South Central states, including Mississippi, and of the evolution of federal Indian policy.


Lewis, Robert Daryl. "Delta Council: Transformer of an Agrarian Mind." M.Ed. thesis, Delta State University, 1984. 115 l.

Examines the work of the Delta Council (originally called the Delta Chamber of Commerce), which encouraged industrialization as a solution to the eighteen-county area's problems of outmigration and a declining agricultural economy, 1935-80.


Lewis, T.H. "Route of De Soto's Expedition from Taliapacena to Huhasene." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 449-67.

Retraces the explorer's 1540-41 route across the Southeast, including what is now North Mississippi; speculative route differs from the accepted theory of the day because the author rejects the contemporary account of Garcilaso de la Vega.


Lewis, William T. The Centennial History of Winston County, Mississippi. Pasadena, Tex.: Globe, 1970. [xv], 210 pp.

Dominated by Civil War history but also includes material on early history and numerous vignettes.


Libby, Billy W. "Senator Hiram Revels of Mississippi Takes His Seat, January-February 1870." Journal of :Mississippi History 37, no. 4 (Nov. 1975): 381-94.

Controversy, as revealed in major northern newspapers, over the seating of the first African American U.S. senator.


Libby, David J. "Plantation and Frontier: Slavery in Mississippi, 1720-1835." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1997. 321 l.

Examines the changing nature of slavery in the colonial and early statehood periods; argues that the Madison County slave insurrection scare of 1835, which occurred just as slaves first represented a majority of the state's population, served to introduce "racial radicalism and mob hysteria" to the state.


Lichtman, Allan. "The Federal Assault against Voting Discrimination in the Deep South, 1957-1967." Journal of Negro History 54, no. 4 (Oct. 1969): 346-67.

Examines activities of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Mississippi and three other states; argues that the Eisenhower administration avoided antagonizing Senator James Eastland by refraining from litigating despite Mississippi's status as the state with the lowest percentage of registered African American voters.


Lindgren, C.E. Panola Remembers: Education in a Southern Community: A Historical and Sociological Study. Kearney, Neb.: Morris, 1994. x, 225 pp.

History of education in the county emphasizes the development of post-1970 white academies and the problem of serving a racially diverse population; based on the author's F.C.P. thesis, "Panola Education: A Historical Interpretation of the Educational Factors between 1836 and the Present Which Led to the Formation and Growth of the South Panola Consolidated School System," Essex University (U.K.), no date.


Lindley, Clyde A. "Admiral Dismukes." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 1 (Mar. 1977): 8.

Brief sketch of Rear Admiral Douglas Eugene Dismukes, who retired from the U.S. Navy in 1925.


Lindley, Clyde A. "Ridgley C. Powers-A Northern Governor of Defeated Mississippi." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 1 (Mar. 1977): 8.

Brief sketch of Powers (1836-1912), who served as Reconstruction governor of the state.



Lindsey, J. Allen. Methodism in the Mississippi Conference. Jackson, Miss.: Hawkins Foundation, 1964. xii, 389 pp.

Cover the period 1894-1919; continues the volume of the same title by W.B. Jones.


Ling, Edwin Rodger, Sr. The Space Crescent: The Untold Story. The Mississippi Connection: The National Space Technology Laboratories. Huntsville, Ala.: Strode, 1984. [xi], 508 pp.

Unofficial history of the Mississippi Test Facility in Hancock County, 1961-83.


Lipscomb, Dabney. "General Stephen D. Lee: His Life, Character, and Services." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 13-33.

Sketch of Lee (1833-1908), Confederate general and first president of Mississippi State University.


Lipscomb, Dabney. "James D. Lynch, of Mississippi, Poet Laureate of the World's Columbian Exposition." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 127-37.


Lipscomb, Dabney. "Mississippi's 'Backwoods Poet.'" Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1, no. 1 (June 1898): 1-15.

Life and poetry of S. Newton Berryhill (1832-87), editor of the Columbus Democrat (Lowndes Co.).


Lipscomb, Dabney. "William Ward, a Mississippi Poet Entitled to Distinction." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 23-42.

Includes biographical information on Ward (1823-87) of Macon (Lowndes Co.).


Lipscomb, Dr. W.L. A History of Columbus, Mississippi, during the Nineteenth Century. Birmingham, Ala.: S.D. Lee Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy, 1909. 167 pp.

History of the Lowndes County town from earliest settlement; includes material on businesses, schools, churches, and the Civil War.


Litoff, Judy Barrett, David C. Smith, and Martha Swain. "'Dear Boys': The Wartime Letters of Mrs. Keith Frazier Somerville, 1943-1945." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 2 (May 1990): 77-93.


Litwack, Leon, and August Meier, eds. Black Leaders of the Nineteenth Century. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988. Blacks in the New World series. xii, 344 pp.

Includes "Three Reconstruction Leaders: Blanche K. Bruce, Robert Brown Elliott, and Holland Thompson," by Howard N. Rabinowitz, and "Isaiah T. Montgomery's Balancing Act," (on the founder of the African American community of Mound Bayou in Bolivar County) by Janet Sharp Hermann.


Lloyd, James B., ed. Lives of Mississippi Authors, 1817-1967. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1981. xxiii, 489 pp.

Brief biographical sketches of approximately fifteen hundred authors who published between 1817 and 1967; includes bibliographies for each entry.


Lobdell, Jared. "A Civil War Tank at Vicksburg." Journal of Mississippi History 25, no. 4 (Oct. 1963): 279-83.

Describes a crude forerunner of the modern tank that was constructed in 1863 during the Vicksburg Campaign.


Locke, Mamie E. "The Role of African-American Women in the Civil Rights and Women's Movements in Hinds County and Sunflower County, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 53, no. 3 (Aug. 1991): 229-39.

Several activists of the 1960s and 1970s are mentioned, including Fannie Lou Hamer; bulk of the article deals with white support for and opposition to the civil rights movement.


Loewen, James W. "Cultural Geography and the Study of Mississippi History and Social Structure." Mississippi Geographer 2, no. 1 (Spring 1974): 27-32.

Studies historical patterns, including land usage, voting, and minority populations (African American and Chinese).


Leowen, James W. The Mississippi Chinese: Between Black and White. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1971. 237 pp.

Focuses on the changing racial identification of Chinese Americans in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta; second edition includes afterward, "Between Black and White Twenty Years Later;" based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Mississippi Chinese," Harvard University, 1968.


Loewen, James, and Charles Sallis, eds. Mississippi: Conflict and Change. N.Y.: Pantheon, 1974. vii, 368 pp.

Controversial secondary school textbook that pays particular attention to race relations and the civil rights movement; winner of the Lillian Smith Award.


Logan, Lida Elmerine. "Bridges and Ferries in Monroe County." Journal of Monroe County History 12 (1986): 15-23.

Tombigbee River crossings in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.


Logan, Lida E. "The Early Settlers of Old Monroe County." Journal of Monroe County History 15 (1989): 2-11.

Lists names of the Buttahatchie settlers of 1815.


Logan, Marie T. Mississippi Louisiana Border Country: A History of Rodney, Miss., St. Joseph, Louisiana, and Environs. Baton Rouge: Claitor's, 1970. xiii, 311 pp.

Includes material on Rodney (Jefferson Co.) and Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, and the ruins of Windsor mansion (Claiborne Co.).


Logue, Calvin M., and Howard Dorgan, eds. A New Diversity in Contemporary Southern Rhetoric. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1987. viii, 268 pp.

Includes "Response of the Main-Line Southern White Protestant Pulpit to Brown v. Board of Education, 1954-1965, by Howard Dorgan; "The Rhetoric of States' Rights and White Supremacy," by Harold Mixon; and "The Speaking of the Governors of the Deep South, 1970-1980," by Waldo Braden.


Logue, Calvin, and Howard Dorgan, eds. The Oratory of Southern Demagogues. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981. viii, 236 pp.

Includes two essays on racial demagogues who used anti-black rhetoric to appeal to working-class white voters: "James Kimble Vardaman: Manipulation through Myths in Mississippi," by William M. Strickland, and "Theodore G. Bilbo: Evangelist of Racial Purity," by Jerry A. Hendrix.


Logue, Larry M. "Who Joined the Confederate Army? Soldiers, Civilians, and Communities in Mississippi." Journal of Social History 26, no. 3 (Spring 1993): 611-23.

Samples over one thousand military-age men and assesses probability of enlistment based on age, wealth, occupation, place of birth, head-of-household status, size of family, and percentage of slaves in home county.


Long, Alice S. "'My Dear, Manly Son': The Death of Jefferson Davis, Jr., at Buntyn Station, Tennessee, 1878." West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 49 (Dec. 1995): 1-22.

Death of twenty-one-year-old "Jeff" of yellow fever at his sister's home near Memphis.


Long, John H. ed, and Peggy Sinko, comp. Mississippi: Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 1993. xx, 250 pp.

Traces the historical evolution of every Mississippi county; includes consolidated chronology, calendar of censuses, and census outline maps.


Lopez, Claira Seal. "The Gubernatorial Career of James Kimble Vardaman." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1964. iv, 118 l.

Narrative of the governorship of Vardaman (1861-1930) concludes that he "represented a genuine movement for greater democracy."


Lopez, Claira S. "James K. Vardaman and the Negro: The Foundation of Mississippi's Racial Policy." Southern Quarterly 3, no. 2 (Jan. 1965): 155-80.

Includes discussion of Vardaman's anti-business bias, his white-supremacist political tactics, his anger at President Theodore Roosevelt, his involvement in the Indianola (Sunflower Co.) postal incident, and his support of Jim Crow laws.


Lord, Stuart B. "Adelbert Ames, Soldier and Politician: A Reevaluation." Maine Historical Society Quarterly 1, no. 2 (Fall 1973): 81-97.

Sketch of Ames (1835-1933) places his political career in Mississippi-as military governor, U.S. senator, and Reconstruction governor-in the context of his long and eventful life.


Lord, Walter. The Past That Would Not Die. N.Y.: Harper and Row, 1965. 275 pp.

Account of the admission of James H. Meredith as the first known African American student at the University of Mississippi, 1962.


Lotterhos, Fred J. "Some Interesting Laws of the Mississippi Territory." Mississippi Law Journal 23, no. 3 (May 1952): 197-209.

Statutes enacted by the territorial assembly respecting public buildings, the Sabbath, sale of spirits and foods, gambling, indebtedness, military service, roads and bridges, weights and measures, and punishments for various offenses.


Love, Ronald. "Community in Transition: A Study of Mound Bayou." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston University, 1982. 120 l.

Sociological study of the all-black Bolivar County town.


Love, Sarah Wofford. A Cloud of Witnesses: A History of the Drew United Methodist Women, 1901-1984. Drew, Miss.: n.p. 1984. [33] pp.

Centennial history of the women's organization of the Sunflower County church.


Love, William A. "General Jackson's Military Road." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 403-17.

Maintains that of several government roads of the era, Jackson's Military Road, completed in 1920, had the greatest effect on the development of the state.


Love, William A. "Historic Localities on Noxubee River." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 315-21.

Mentions sites in Noxubee and Oktibbeha counties: the Choctaw Agency, Council Bluff, Six Town Trail and Bugg's Ferry crossings, the Creek and Choctaw ballground, the home of chief David Folsom, and the birthplace of chief Pushmataha.


Love, William A. "Lowndes County, Its Antiquities and Pioneer Settlers." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 351-72.

Describes physical geography, Indian missions and villages, white settlers, and a Presbyterian congregation at Columbus.


Love, William A. "The Mayhew Mission to the Choctaws." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 363-402.

Oktibbeha County mission, 1820; includes biographical sketch of the Reverend Cyrus Kingsbury and a list of missionaries sent to Mississippi by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 1818-35.


Love, William A. "Mingo Moshulitubbee's Prairie Village." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 373-78.

Describes and identifies the location of the Noxubee County village, which was the site of a Choctaw council with Shawnee chief Tecumseh in 1811.


Love, William A. "Mississippi at Gettysburg." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 25-51.

Identifies Mississippians who fought in the 1863 Civil War battle.


Love, William A. "Route of De Soto's Expedition through Lowndes County, Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1921): 268-76.

Traces the route based on accounts of contemporary chroniclers of the sixteenth-century expedition.


Lowe, Edna Haley. "Mississippi Bibliography." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1938. 265 l.

Checklist, sporadically annotated, over two thousand primary and secondary books and articles; includes newspaper articles, scientific works, and general works touching only lightly on Mississippi, but excludes works of literature and unpublished manuscripts and private papers.


Lowery, Charles D. "The Great Migration to the Mississippi Territory, 1798-1819." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 3 (Aug. 1968): 178-92.

Identifies two waves of migration, 1798-1812 and 1815-19, and examines reasons for migration and the race, place of origin, destination, and permanence of the emigrants.


Lowery, Bill G., Andrew A. Kincannon, and Rosewell G. Lowery. Mississippi: A Historical Reader. Nashville, Tenn.: Marshall and Bruce, 1937. 363 pp.

Secondary school textbook.


Lowry, Mark. "Population and Economy, Part II: Secondary and Tertiary Sectors." Mississippi Geographer 3, no. 1 (Spring 1975): 21-36.

Considers the relationship between the accelerated growth of Mississippi's non-farm population and the increase of non-agricultural employment, 1940-60; compares white and African American non-farm populations.


Lowry, Mark. "Population and Economy, Part I: Agriculture." Mississippi Geographer 2, no. 1 (Spring 1979): 33-45.

Examines post-1940 farm population decline in Mississippi; tables and maps reveal population, labor, and mechanization intensity and farmland and agricultural labor productivity to 1960.


Lowry, Robert, and William H. McCardle. A History of Mississippi from the Discovery of the Great River by Hernando De Soto Including the Earliest Settlement Made by the French, Under Iberville to the Death of Jefferson Davis. Jackson, Miss.: R.H. Henry, 1891. viii, 648 pp.

Includes brief individual histories of the settlement and organization of seventy-five counties.


Lowry, Robert, and William H. McCardle. A History of Mississippi for Use in Schools. N.Y.: University, 1892. xlvi, 262 pp.

Organized largely by gubernatorial administration through Alselm McLaurin; reprints the Constitution of 1890.


Lucas, Aubrey Keith. "The Mississippi Legislature and Mississippi Public Higher Education, 1890-1960." Ph.D. dissertation, Florida State University, 1966. vii, 295 l.

Actions of the state legislature pertaining to public higher education.


Lucas, Charles Howard. "History of the Church of Christ in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1964. vii, 101 l.

Primarily post-1828 nineteenth-century history.


Lucas, M. Philip. "Beyond McCormick and Miles: The Pre-Partisan Political Culture of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 4 (Nov. 1982): 329-48.

Finds personal, political, and economic causes for the rapid rise to dominance of the Whig and Democratic parties in the state by the 1840s; based on the author's master's thesis, "The Period of Political Alchemy: Party in the Mississippi Legislature, 1835-1846," Cornell University, 1981, and his Ph.D. dissertation, "The Development of the Second Party System in Mississippi, 1817-1846," Cornell University, 1983.


Lucas, M. Philip. "'To Carry Out Great Fundamental Principles': The Antebellum Southern Political Culture." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 1 (Feb. 1990): 1-22.

Disputes the contention of many historians that the South of the 1830s and 1840s did not have a true two-party political system.


Lucas, Sue T. "Edmund P. Noel, Progressive." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1965. v, 108 l.

Argues that Noel, governor from 1908 to 1912, was a true progressive.


Lundquist, Kenneth. "The Administration of Benjamin Grubb Humphreys, Governor of Mississippi, 1865-1868." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1962. [vi], 95 l.

Events of Humphreys's difficult administration during the early years of Reconstruction.


Lundy, James William. "Alexander G. McNutt: A Biography." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 98 l.

McNutt (1802-48) was a Vicksburg (Warren Co.) planter and governor of Mississippi who was involved in the controversial charter of the Union Bank and the repudiation of the bank's bonds in 1841.


Luthin, Reinhard H. American Demagogues: Twentieth Century. Boston: Beacon, 1954. xv, 368 pp.

Includes a chapter on Theodore G. Bilbo (1877-1947), governor and U.S. senator from Mississippi.


Luthin, Reinhard H. "Some Demagogues in American History." American Historical Review 57, no. 4 (Oct. 1951): 22-46.

Argues that demagogues have flourished in America since the late eighteenth century; Mississippians mentioned include Franklin E. Plummer, Reuben Davis, Albert Gallatin Brown, and James K. Vardaman.


Lyles, Elizabeth V. "Dr. William Durham Lyles." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 47 (Sept. 1988): 5-6; 48 (Dec. 1988): 4-5.

Biographical sketch of Lyles (b. 1817?).


Lyles, Samuel Theron. "Conditions Relating to Sectionalism in Mississippi from 1838 to 1852." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1932. 120 l.

Political issues that engendered intra-state sectional rivalries: the founding of the University of Mississippi; reapportionment, hospital, and railroad bills in the legislature; the repudiation of Union and Planters Bank bonds; and the proposed secession of Southwest Mississippi counties in 1846.


Lynch, James D. The Bench and Bar of Mississippi. N.Y.: E.J. Hale and Son, 1881. vi, 539 pp.

Biographical sketches and some portrait likenesses of eighty-four lawyers and judges, 1795-1880.


Lynch, James D. Kemper County Vindicated, and a Peep at Radical Rule in Mississippi. N.Y.: E.J. Hale and Son, 1879. 416 pp.

Earliest secondary account of Reconstruction in the nation.


Lynch, Major John R. Some Historical Errors of James Ford Rhodes. Boston: Cornhill, 1922. xv, 115 pp.

Disputes Rhodes's account of Mississippi Reconstruction in his History of the United in 1877 (1902); see also Lynch's article of the same title in the Journal of Negro History States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Final Restoration of Home Rule at the South 2, no. 4 (Oct. 1917): 345-68.


Lynch, William O. "The Westward Flow of Southern Colonists before 1861." Journal of Southern History 9, no. 3 (Aug. 1943): 303-27.

Focuses on Virginians who moved to the Southeast, including Mississippi, from 1783 to 1861; notes the number of Virginians and foreign-borns living in Mississippi in 1860.


Lytal, Billy Dewayne. "Theatrical Entertainment in Jackson, Mississippi, 1910-1920." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1964. ix, 136 l.

Plays presented in Jackson; based entirely on advertisements and reviews in the Jackson Daily News and Clarion-Ledger.


Lytle, Andrew Nelson. Bedford Forrest and His Critter Company. N.Y.: Minton, Balch, 1931. ix, 402 pp.

Biography of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest.


Mabry, Donald J. "The Rise and Fall of Ace Records: A Case Study in the Independent Record Business." Business History Review 64, no. 3 (Autumn 1990): 411-50.

Using Ace Records of Jackson (Hinds Co.) as a case study, examines the changing character of the record business in the 1950s and 1960s and the influence on American culture of rhythm and blues and rock 'n' roll music.


Mabry, William Alexander. "Disfranchisement of the Negro in Mississippi." Journal of Southern History 4, no. 3 (Aug. 1938): 318-33.

Legal disfranchisement measures embodied in the state Constitution of 1890 in response to the threatened Lodge "Force Bill" of 1890, which would have mandated federal supervision of congressional elections.


MacDonnell, Francis. "Reconstruction in the Wake of Vietnam: The Pardoning of Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis." Civil War History 40, no. 2 (June 1994): 119-33.

Explains President Jimmy Carter's 1978 posthumous pardons of Confederate leaders Davis and Lee in terms of the national call for reconciliation following the Vietnam War.


Maclachlan, John Miller. "Mississippi, a Regional Socio-Economic Analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina, 1937. [1], 558 l.

Statistical analysis, 1800-1930, of farm life, marriage and divorce, population and migration, public health and education, and trade and industry.


MacLeod, William Christie. "Natchez Political Evolution." American Anthropologist 26, no. 2 (Apr./June 1924): 201-29.

Suggests that obligatory spousal sacrifice at Natchez Indian royal funerals may account for the unusual requirement that Natchez royals must marry into the lowest social class.


"Macon's First Public School." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 41 (Mar. 1987): 4, 8.

History of the school, 1867-80.


"Macon Was a War-Time Capital." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 19 (Sept. 1981): 1-2.

Macon was the last Confederate capital of Mississippi.


MacTavish, Bruce Duncan. "With Strangers United in Kindred Relation: Education, Religion and Community in Northern Mississippi, 1836-1880." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1993. viii, 374 l.

Broad study of community life in nineteenth-century North Mississippi examines the role of schools and churches in establishing communities and analyzes economic and class changes wrought by the cotton economy.


Madden, Robert R. "The History of Grindstone Ford." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 1 (Feb. 1969): 28-39.

Much-used Natchez Trace ford at Bib Bayou Pierre (Claiborne Co.) in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; much of the article deals with area settlers, particularly Daniel Burnett and William H. Wooldridge.


Madden, Robert R. "Old Bay Springs, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 2 (May 1969): 116-20.

Brief history, 1838-1890s, of a ghost town in Tishomingo County, told through the life of its most prominent citizen, James Files Gresham.


Maddox, Dawn. "The Buildings and Grounds of Jefferson College in the Nineteenth Century." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 1 (Feb. 1973): 37-53.

Describes buildings, descent into disrepair, and renovation of the Washington (Adams Co.) college, c. 1810-99.


Magee, Hattie. "Reconstruction in Lawrence and Jefferson Davis Counties." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 163-204.

Reconstruction in old Lawrence (present-day Lawrence and Jefferson Davis) County, including politics, taxation, organizations, schools, and economy; includes introduction on early history of the counties.


Magnolia Garden Clubs, comp. Lexington, Mississippi: Holmes County, 1833-1976. Florence, Miss.: Messenger, 1976. 151 pp.

Includes general history and material on African American citizenry, churches, schools, organizations, businesses, communication, transportation, government, and professionals.


Magrath, C. Peter. Yazoo: Law and Politics in the New Republic: The Case of Fletcher v. Peck. Providence, R.I.: Brown University Press, 1966. ix, 243 pp.

Significance of the 1810 U.S. Supreme Court decision that originated in 1795 as a contract case involving land fraud in territorial Mississippi.


Magruder, W.W. "The Legal Status of Slaves in Mississippi before the War." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 133-42.

Undocumented discussion of laws and court decisions respecting slavery.


Maier, Edward L., III. "Behind the Barbed Wire: German Prisoners of War in Mississippi, 1943-1946." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1993. vii, 125 l.

Conditions and experiences at camps Clinton (Hinds Co.), Shelby (Forrest Co.), Como (Panola Co.), McCain (Grenada Co.), and other smaller camps.


Mair, George. Oprah Winfrey: The Real Story. N.Y.: Birch Lane, 1994. viii, 376 pp.

Biography of the talk show host, who was born in 1954 near Kosciusko (Attala Co.).


Mallonee, Frank Buckner. "The Political Thought of Jefferson Davis." Ph.D. dissertation, Emory University, 1966. 219 l.

Concentrates on Davis's reactions to the political issues of his day, but also includes an introductory biographical chapter.


Malloy, Christopher J., and Charles A. Weeks. "Shuttle Diplomacy, Eighteenth-Century Style: Stephen Minor's First Mission to the Choctaws and Journal, May-June, 1791." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 1 (Feb. 1993): 31-51.

Bulk of the article translates Minor's diaries; introduction explains his role in resolving a border dispute between the Spanish and the Choctaws.


Malone, James H. The Chickasaw Nation: A Short Sketch of a Noble People. Louisville, Ky.: John P. Morton, 1922. xxx, 537 pp.

Origin and culture, including information on eighteenth-century chief Piomingo; bulk of the volume concerns treaties, contact with European explorers, and Chickasaw life in Oklahoma.


Maloney, John Michael. "Reaction of Mississippi Newspapers to the Civil Rights Activities of the 1960s." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1974. [ii], 68 l.

Includes responses to the integration of the University of Mississippi, murders of civil rights workers, federal civil rights legislation, and desegregation of public schools.


Mancini, Matthew J. One Dies, Get Another: Convict Leasing in the American South, 1866-1928. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1996. xi, 283 pp.

See chapter seven, "Mississippi: An Epidemic Death Rate without the Epidemic."


Maness, Lonnie E. "Forrest's New command and the Failure of William Sooy Smith's Invasion of Mississippi." West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 40 (Dec. 1986): 55-71.

Detailed narrative of troop movements leading up to the 1864 battle near Okolona (Chickasaw Co.) between Confederate troops under General Nathan Bedford Forrest and Union troops under General Smith.


Maness, Lonnie E. "Jefferson Davis as War Leader: The Case from Fort Donelson through the Kentucky Invasion of 1862." West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 49 (Dec. 1995): 101-20.

Blames generals in the field for the failure of the Army of Tennessee.


Maness, Lonnie E. An Untutored Genius: The Military Career of General Nathan Bedford Forrest. Oxford, Miss.: Guild Bindery, 1990. x, 425 pp.

Primarily a study of Forrest's Civil War exploits.


Mangum, Autrey William. Down Memory Lane: A History of Iuka, Mississippi, 1900-1915. Bossier City, La.: Everett's Bindery, 1971. ix, 333 pp.

Primarily reminiscences of residents of the Tishomingo County town.


Mann, Kenneth E. "Black Leaders in National Politics, 1873-1943: A Study of Legislative Persuasion." Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana University, 1971. 273 l.

Careers of five African American U.S. senators and congressmen, including Representative John Roy Lynch (1847-1939) and Senator Blanche Kelso Bruce (1841-98).


Mann, Kenneth Eugene. "Blanche Kelso Bruce: United States Senator with a Constituency." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 2 (May 1976): 183-98.

Concentrates on the political career of Bruce, the first African American to serve a full term in the Senate, 1875-81.


Maples, Luther. Camp Fires of Ship Island. Gulfport, Miss.: Gulfport Printery, 1947. [21] pp.

Brief narrative of Ship Island history intended for tourists.


Mapp, Alf J., Jr. Frock Coats and Epaulets: Psychological Portraits of Confederate Military and Political Leaders. N.Y.: T. Yoseloff, 1963. 501 pp.

Chapter one, "Jefferson Davis: Aristocrat by Design," presents an interpretation of Davis based solely on secondary sources.


Marable, Manning. "The Politics of Black Land Tenure, 1877-1915." Agricultural History 53, no. 1 (Jan. 1979): 142-52.

Factors (disastrous cotton prices, the boll weevil, bank failures, violent race relations, and disfranchisement) contributing to the collapse of African American land ownership, which had reached its zenith after the turn of the century in the Black Belt of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia.


Marion County Historical Society. History of Marion County, Mississippi. Marceline, Mo.: Walsworth, 1976. ix, 198 pp.

Settlement, Civil War, prominent citizens, health care, churches, organizations, newspapers, agriculture, transportation, crime, cemeteries, and American Bicentennial activities.


Marion County Chamber of Commerce. Together: Columbia-Marion County. Columbia, Miss.: Marion County Chamber of Commerce, [1963?]. 69 pp.

Includes essays on history of Columbia, the John Ford House, Governor Hugh L. White, and Jackson's Military Road.


Marks, Carole. "Black Workers and the Great Migration North." Phylon 46, no. 2 (June 1985): 148-61.

Quantitative study concludes that most early- and mid-twentieth century migrants, many of whom were Mississippians, were not farm laborers, as has been generally assumed.


Marks Presbyterian Church, Marks, Mississippi. N.p., n.d. 6 pp.

Fiftieth anniversary publication includes brief history of the Quitman County congregation.


Marling, Karal Ann. Graceland: Going Home with Elvis. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1996. 259 pp.

The Memphis mansion and other locations associated with Elvis Presley's life and career.


Marquette, Clare Leslie. "The Life and Letters of a Pontotoc Pioneer, Charles Hathaway Larrabee." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 2 (Apr. 1958): 77-98.

Larabee practiced law in Pontotoc (Pontotoc Co.) from 1841 to 1847.


Marsh, Dave. Art direction by Bea Feitler. Elvis. N.Y.: Rolling Stone, 1982. vii, 246 pp.

Heavily illustrated biography of Elvis Presley.


Marsh, Harry D. Hodding Carter's Newspaper on School Desegregation, 1954-55. Columbia, S.C.: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, 1985. Journalism Monographs, no. 92. 23 pp.

Analyzes Carter's editorials in the Greenville (Washington Co.) Delta-Democrat-Times.


Marshall, Theodora Britton, and Gladys Crail Evans. They Found It In Natchez. New Orleans, La.: Pelican, 1939. 236 pp.

Includes chapters on Indians, cotton planters, slaves, outlaws and gamblers, Civil War, mansions, and French, English, and Spanish officials.


Martin, Jerry. A Place Called Belmont. Belmont, Miss.: the author, 1978. xii, 298 pp.

History of the southern Tishomingo County community, 1837-1978; includes information on Chickasaw settlements in the area.


Martini, Don. "The Search for Ackia." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 5, no. 1 (Nov. 1972): 17-31.

Attempt to locate the Chicksaw village and battle site in present-day Lee County using historical documents and archaeological evidence.


Martino, Claudia. "A Survey of Newspapers Published in Grenada, Mississippi, from 1835 to 1980." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1980. vi, 125 l.

Includes information on the Sentinel, Daily Star, Grenada County Weekly, and Sentinel-Star, as well as mentions of nearly two dozen small, short-lived papers in the Grenada County town.


Massengill, Reed. Portrait of a Racist: The Man Who Killed Medgar Evers? N.Y.: St. Martin's, 1994. x, 403 pp.

Biography of Byron De La Beckwith (b. 1920) by his nephew; traces the roots of Beckwith's alcoholism, violent nature, and racism to his troubled family background and describes his arrest, acquittal, and conviction nearly three decades later for the 1963 murder of civil rights leader Evers in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Massey, Edwin Bernard, Jr. "Development of the Anti-Evolution Bill in the Mississippi Legislature in 1926." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1966. 91 l.

Legislative wrangling and the role of the fundamentalist Bible Crusaders of America in the passage of the Evans-Hickey Bill outlawing the teaching of the theory of evolution in Mississippi's public schools.


Mathes, J. Harvey. General Forrest. N.Y.: D. Appleton, 1902. The Great Commanders series. ix, 395 pp.

Sympathetic biography of General Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-77), who spent his childhood in Tippah County.


Mathes, J. Harvey. The Old Guard in Gray: Researches in the Annals of the Confederate Historical Association. Sketches of Memphis Veterans Who Upheld Her Standard in the War, and of Other Confederate Worthies. Memphis, Tenn.: S.C. Toof, 1897. 292 pp.

Biographical sketches of over four hundred veterans, many of whom came from Mississippi or served in Mississippi regiments.


Mathews, Catharine Van Cortlandt. Andrew Ellicott: His Life and Letters. N.Y.: Grafton, 1908. x, 256 pp.

Two chapters deal with the survey Ellicott (1754-1820) made of the boundary between Spanish Florida and U.S. territories as established by the Pinckney-Godoy Treaty of 1795; part of the line went through present-day South Mississippi.


Mathis, Emily Duncan. "A Historical Study of Curricular Changes in Selected Public Junior Colleges in Mississippi." Ed.D. dissertation, University of Tennessee, 1971. ix, 116 l.

Part of chapter two, "Historical Development of the Junior College in Mississippi," concentrates on the period from the 1920s to the 1960s.


Matthew-Walker, Robert. Heartbreak Hotel: The Life and Music of Elvis Presley. Chessington, Surrey, England: Castle Communications, 1995. 251 pp.

Brief biography, followed by extensive discussion of Presley's music.


Matthias, Virginia Park. "Natchez-under-the Hill: As It Developed under the Influence of the Mississippi River and the Natchez Trace." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 4 (Oct. 1945): 201-21.

Origin of the unsavory reputation of the dock area of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Mattice, Royal, Jr. "Mississippi Manufactures in 1860." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1935. v, 76 l.

Assesses the nature and size of industries, profitability, and reasons for the relative lack of industrial prosperity in the last antebellum year.


Mattison, William Harvey. "Chief Tishomingo-A Legend in His Own Time in Monroe County." Journal of Monroe County History 15 (1989): 27-29.

Thumbnail sketch of the last Chickasaw chief before removal to Indian Territory.


Mattison, William Harvey. "Voices from the Past: Amory City Government, February 1888-December 1889." Journal of Monroe County History 12 (1986): 26-29.

First year of city government.


Mattison, William Harvey. "Voices from the Past, Part II: Amory City Government, January 1890-December 1897." Journal of Monroe County History 13 (1987): 15-19.

Second decade of city government.


Mauldin, Dolores McHenry. "George Austin McHenry." Journal of Mississippi History 53, no. 1 (Feb. 1991): 35-43.

Life of McHenry (1858-1931), founder of Niles City (now McHenry), a lumbering settlement in Harrison County.


Mauldin, Douglas L. "Whig and Republican Voting Trends in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1963. 81 l.

Demonstrates geographical continuity between antebellum Whig strongholds and Republican voting in the 1952 presidential election.


Mauldin, Katie Durelle. "Historical Spots in Pontotoc County." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1931. vii, 61 l.

County history with descriptions of the Natchez Trace, Cotton Gin Road, Lafayette Springs resort, Monroe (Indian) Mission, Tockshish community, Camp Ground Methodist Church, Chickasaw College, Lochinvar mansion, and Rosalba Lake.


Maxson, Etienne William. The Progress of the Races. Washington: Murray Brothers Printing, 1930. 66 pp.

Includes brief histories of four Hancock County communities: Pearlington, Logtown, Napoleon, and Gainesville.


Maxwell, Betty Vaughn. "The Operation of Doro Plantation, 1852-1862." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College for Women, 1968. 90 l.

Crops, livestock, slaves, overseers, and the impact of the Civil War on the Bolivar County plantation of Governor Charles Clark (1810-77).


Maxwell, Robert S. "The Impact of Forestry on the Gulf Coast." Forest History 17, no. 1 (Apr. 1973): 30-35.

Development of the forest industry in Mississippi and other Gulf Coast states.


May, Eva Mae, comp. The Story of Electric Mills, Mississippi. N.p., 1972. 152 pp.

Mostly family histories and reminiscences of the Kemper County community, which was founded in 1912.


May, Robert E. "In Search of Old Chapultepec-Tracing the History of Mississippi's John A. Quitman." Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 2 (Summer 1996): 163-76.

Quitman's biographer relates his research experiences and describes the special relationship between a biographer and his subject.


May, Robert E. "John A. Quitman and the Southern Martial Spirit." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 2 (May 1979): 155-81.

Observes that Quitman (1798-1858), often considered to have been the quintessential southern military zealot, was in fact a transplanted Northerner who embodied the national military fervor of his era.


May, Robert E. "John A. Quitman and His Slaves: Reconciling Slave Resistance with the Proslavery Defense." Journal of Southern History 46, no. 4 (Nov. 1980): 551-70.

Interprets Quitman's relationship to his slaves in light of recent literature on slavery, arguing that he underestimated slave resistance at the same time that his most loyal servants reinforced his belief in the proslavery ideology.


May, Robert E. John A. Quitman: Old South Crusader. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1985. Southern Biography series. xviii, 465 pp.

Only modern biography of Quitman (1799-1858), general, congressman, and governor.


May, Robert E. "Psychobiography and Secession: The Southern Radical as Maladjusted 'Outsider.'" Civil War History 34, no.1 (Mar. 1988): 46-69.

Historiographical essay on psychobiographical treatments of secessionists includes discussion of John A. Quitman and Henry Hughes and mention of L.Q.C. Lamar and Jefferson Davis.


May, Robert E. The Southern Dream of a Caribbean Empire, 1854-1861. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1973. x, 286 pp.

Chapter three, "The Cuba Movement, 1854-1855," deals largely with Mississippian John A. Quitman's efforts to annex Cuba as a slave state; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Southern Dream of a Caribbean Empire, 1854-1865," University of Wisconsin, 1969.


May, Robert E. "Southern Elite Women, Sectional Extremism, and the Male Political Sphere: The Case of John A. Quitman's Wife and Female Descendants, 1847-1931." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 4 (Nov. 1988): 251-85.

Documents the political opinions of the wife, daughters, and granddaughters of Quitman and fits their political awareness into the modern debate over the role of antebellum southern women.


Mayes, Edward. "Charles Betts Galloway." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 21-30.

Obituary of Galloway (1849-1909), Methodist bishop and amateur historian; includes likeness.


Mayes, Edward. History of Education in Mississippi. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1899. 290 pp.

History of colleges and academies, the University of Mississippi, and five defunct institutions; also includes brief discussion of education in the colonial period, education for African Americans, and antebellum and postbellum common schools.


Mayes, Edward. Lucius Q.C. Lamar: His Life, Times, and Speeches, 1825-1893. Nashville, Tenn.: Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1896. 820 pp.

Earliest biography of Lamar, a sometime resident of Oxford (Lafayette Co.), author of Mississippi's Ordinance of Secession, law professor at the University of Mississippi, and justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.


Mayne, John A. "L.Q.C. Lamar's 'Eulogy' of Charles Sumner: A Reinterpretation." Historian 22, no. 3 (May 1960): 296-311.

Advocates a reading of Lamar's eulogy in Congress as a "plea for a better understanding of the South by the North."


McAdam, Doug. Freedom Summer. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1988. 333 pp.

Assesses impact of civil rights movement experiences on many of the over one thousand student volunteers who came to Mississippi for the voter registration Summer Project in 1964.


McAlexander, Hubert H. "Flush Times in Holly Springs." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 1 (Feb. 1986): 1-13.

Describes early settlement, mid-1830s, of the Marshall County town, the economic boom of the late 1830s, and the depression brought on by the collapse of the cotton market, 1840.


McAlexander, Hubert, Jr. "General Earl Van Dorn and Faulkner's Use of History." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 4 (Nov. 1977): 357-61.

Argues that William Faulkner patterned characters in Sartoris, Absalom, Absalom!, and Light in August on the life of the Confederate general.


McAlexander, Hubert Horton. The Prodigal Daughter: A Biography of Sherwood Bonner. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981. xvi, 247 pp.

Life and works of writer Katharine Sherwood Bonner McDowell (1849-83) of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.).


McAlexander, Hubert H. "The Saga of a Mixed-Blood Chickasaw Dynasty." Journal of Mississippi History 49, 4 (Nov. 1987): 289-300.

Story of the Thomas Love family, one of several ethnically-mixed Chickasaw families that settled near Holly Springs (Marshall Co.).


McBee, May Wilson. The Life and Times of David Smith: Patriot, Pioneer, and Indian Fighter. Kansas City, Mo.: n.p., 1959. 84 pp.

Major David Smith (1753-1835), father-in-law of Governor Hiram Runnels, settled at "Soldier's Rest" in Hinds County in 1823.


McBride, Kim Arbogast. "Tenancy and the Domestic Domain: Fertility and Household Organization Among Postbellum Mississippi Tenant Farmers. Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State University, 1990. 234 l.

Analysis of public records of an anonymous Northeast Mississippi county yields conclusions about fertility rate, marriage patterns, and agricultural practices of African American tenant farmers.


McBride, William Stephen. "Flush Times on the Upper Tombigbee: Settlement and Economic Development in Lowndes County, Mississippi, 1833-1860. Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State University, 1991. x, 243 l.

Anthropology dissertation uses an economic behavior model to examine settlement patterns, class structure, and economic bahavior.


McCain, William D. "The Administration of David Holmes, Governor of the Mississippi Territory, 1809-1817." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 328-47.

Government during the tenure of the last territorial governor; includes brief surveys of Holmes's life and the activities of the constitutional convention of 1817. (An investigation by the American Historical Association found that this article had been plagiarized from a master's thesis by Frances Elizabeth Melton, "The Public Career of David Holmes," Emory University, 1966.)


McCain, William D. "Education in Mississippi in 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 3 (July 1960): 153-66.

Available public and private education.


McCain, William D. "History and Program of the Mississippi State Department of Archives and History." American Archivist 13, no. 1 (Jan. 1950): 27-34.

Establishment of the department in 1902 and its subsequent activities.


McCain, William D. "Mississippiana for Public, High School, and Junior College Libraries." Journal of Mississippi History 3, no. 1 (Jan 1941): 3-25.

Bibliography of suggested holdings.


McCain, William D. "Nathan Bedford Forrest: An Evaluation." Journal of Mississippi History 24, no. 4 (Oct. 1962): 203-25.

Undocumented essay on the wartime career of the Confederate general who was born in Mississippi.


McCain, William David. "The Populist Party in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1931. 152 l.

Largely copied from Cecil Johnson's master's thesis, "The Agrarian Crusade with Special Reference to Mississippi," University of Virginia, 1924.


McCain, William D., ed. The Story of Jackson: A History of the Capital of Mississippi, 1821-1951. Jackson, Miss.: J.F. Hyer, 1953. 2 vols.

Essays cover early history; public buildings; transportation, communication, and accommodations; business, industry, and professions; education; theater and entertainment; religion; crime; government; Civil War and Reconstruction; the press; and organizations; volume two is devoted to biographical sketches.


McCain, William D. "Theodore Gilmore Bilbo and the Mississippi Delta." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 1 (Feb. 1969): 1-27.

Sympathetic review of Bilbo's political career, focusing on Deltans' attitudes toward him; includes voting statistics and land assessments by county.


McCardell, John. "John A. Quitman and the Compromise of 1850 in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 3 (Aug. 1975): 239-66.

Reviews Quitman's political career, concentrating on his opposition to the Compromise of 1850.


McCarty, George Wayman. "A History of the Universalist Church in the Mid-South." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1964. 131 l.

Describes characteristics and origins of Universalist congregations in Mississippi and Alabama and argues that the church's legacy was encouragement of more liberal positions among other denominations, especially the Methodist Church.


McCarty, Kenneth G., Jr., ed. Hattiesburg: A Pictorial History. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1982. x, 214 pp.

Essays by John R. Skates, William T. Schmidt, and John E. Gonzales on Hattiesburg from pre-World War I to 1982; includes many photographs of the University of Southern Mississippi and of the city and surrounding area.


McCash, William Barton. "Colonel Abel D. Streight's Raid, His Capture, and Imprisonment." M.A. thesis, University of Georgia, 1959. 425 l.

Union Colonel Streight's army marched through the extreme northeast corner of Mississippi on its way to cut off the Western and Atlantic Railroad in Georgia in the spring of 1863.


McCleskey, Herbert Lynn. "The Public Career of John Sharp Williams." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1933. 53 l.

Williams (1854-1932) as congressman, U.S. senator, and in retirement.


McClurg, Monroe. "The State of Louisiana versus the State of Mississippi: Disputed Boundary in the Waters of the Gulf of Mexico." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 293-330.

Boundary dispute, 1901-1904, argued before the U.S Supreme Court decided which state owned valuable oyster beds in the Gulf.


McCorkle, James L., Jr. "Cotton, War, and Mississippi, 1914-1915." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 2 (May 1983): 90-115.

Efforts to increase cotton prices after the disastrous 1914 price drop, including withholding crops, crop diversification, and acreage curtailment.


McCorkle, James L., Jr. "From Neutrality to War: Mississippi, 1914-1917." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1962. 97 l.

Process by which Mississippi public opinion changed from opposition to war in 1914 to acceptance of intervention in 1917.


McCorkle, James L., Jr. "The Illinois Central Railroad and the Mississippi Commercial Vegetable Industry." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 2 (May 1977): 155-72.

Finds that relations between the railroad and the "truck croppers" were often strained despite the railroad's efforts to promote the industry, 1880s-1940.


McCorkle, James L. "Mississippi Truck Crops: An Exercise in Agrarian Organization." Mississippi Quarterly 33, no. 1 (Winter 1979-80): 55-77.

Traces the rise and decline, 1870s-1960s, of produce farming, which began in Copiah County; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Mississippi Vegetable Industry: A History," University of Mississippi, 1966.


McCorkle, James L., Jr. "Mississippi from Neutrality to War (1914-1917)." Journal of Mississippi History 43, no. 2 (May 1981): 85-125.

Economic and political reasons for opposition and support of intervention in World War I, especially by U.S. senator James K. Vardaman.


McCorkle, James L., Jr. "Nineteenth Century Beginnings of the Commercial Vegetable Industry in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 4 (Nov. 1968): 260-74.

Development of truck farming, centered in Copiah County.


McCraw, Joseph Walter. "Early Life and Contributions of an Irish Confederate." M.A. thesis, Mississippi Southern College, 1957. v, 165 l.

Irish-born John Logan Power (1834-1901) became editor and publisher of the Jackson Daily News and the Jackson Clarion; much of the thesis concerns Power's impressions of the 1863 Siege of Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


McCullouch, James Victor. "A History of Jasper County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1954. 155 l.

History of the rural Southeast Mississippi county beginning with its inhabitation before 1830 by Six-Town Choctaws; includes information on transportation, schools, and churches.


McCutchen, Samuel Proctor. "The Political Career of Albert Gallatin Brown." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Chicago, 1930. 259 l.

Brown (1813-80) as secessionist governor of Mississippi, U.S. senator, and Confederate senator.


McDermott, John Francis, ed. The Spanish in the Mississippi Valley, 1762-1804. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1974. xiii, 421 pp.

Papers from the conference of the same name include "The Bruins and the Formulation of Spanish Immigration Policy in the Old Southwest, 1787-88," by William S. Coker, which deals with Bryan and Peter Bryan Bruin of Natchez.


McDonald, Forrest, and Grady McWhiney. "The Antebellum Southern Herdsman: A Reinterpretation." Journal of Southern History 41, no. 2 (May 1975): 147-66.

Includes discussion of the open range in Mississippi throughout the antebellum period; finds that the "sturdy yeomen" of the state tended to raise corn rather than cotton.


McDonald, James Edgar. "The Planting of Disciples of Christ in Mississippi: 1830-1884." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1947. 105 l.

Work of early Christian Church evangelists.


McDonald, Lyla Merrill. Iuka's History, Embodying Dudley's Battle of Iuka. Corinth, Miss.: Rankin Printery, n.d. 32 pp.

Undocumented booklet deals with Tishomingo County settlers, schools and churches, geology, town and county government, and the Civil War Battle of Iuka, 1862.


McDowell, Ellen Burton. "Documenting Antebellum Interiors in the Lower Mississippi River Valley: A Guide to Historic Research for House Museums." M.A. thesis, University of Georgia, 1993. 80 l.

Plantation house interiors in the area south of Natchez.


McDowell, Jennifer, and Milton Loventhal, eds. Black Politics: A Study and Annotated Bibliography of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. San Jose, Cal.: Center for the Study of Political Science, 1971. 96 pp.

Origins of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, formed in 1964 to give African Americans a voice in Democratic national politics.


McElroy, Robert. Jefferson Davis, the Unreal and the Real. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1937. 2 vols.

Sympathetic biography portrays the Confederate president as a scapegoat for the South's failure to win the Civil War.


McGahey, Samuel O. "An Unusual House Construction in Mississippi." Southeastern Archaeological Conference Bulletin 11 (1969): 6-9.

Observes that an excavated house site in Coahoma County may fit Garsilaso de la Vega's sixteenth-century report of elevated Indian houses designed to weather floods.


McGhee, Flora Ann Caldwell. "Mississippi's Black Newspapers: Their History, Content, and Future." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1985. 129 l.

Analyzes the role of the African American press in the state, 1857-1984.


McGroarty, William Buckner. "Major Andrew Ellicott and His Historic Boundary Lines." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 58, no. 1 (Jan. 1950): 98-111.

Includes material on Ellicott's survey of the northern boundary of the Mississippi Territory, 1798.


McHenry, Stewart G. "Lebanese Peddlers in the Lower Mississippi River Valley." Mississippi Geographer 7, no. 1 (Spring 1979): 35-47.

Areas of settlement, peddling routes, and maintenance of ethnic identity among twentieth-century Lebanese peddlers in Mississippi.


McHugh, Robert. "Jefferson Davis." Southern Partisan 3 (Summer 1983): 10-15.

Brief undocumented essay on the capture and imprisonment of Davis after the Civil War.


McIntire, Carl. Jackson: The Way We Were…Old Postcard Views from the Collections of Forrest L. Cooper and Donald F. Garrett. [Jackson, Miss.]: n.p., [1981?]. [65] pp.

Reproduces and annotates nearly two hundred postcards of Jackson (Hinds Co.), 1902-1950s.


McKee, James Willette, Jr. "William Barksdale: The Intrepid Mississippian." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1966. iv, 319 l.

Life of Barksdale (1821-63) of Lowndes County, a lawyer, congressman, and Confederate officer; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, Mississippi State University, 1964.


McKee, James W., Jr. "William Barksdale and the Congressional Election of 1853 in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 2 (May 1972): 129-58.

Describes the hotly-contested election of Democrat Barksdale of Lowndes County.


McKee, Jesse O. "The Choctaw Indians: A Geographical Study in Cultural Change." Southern Quarterly 9, no. 2 (Jan. 1971): 107-41.

Traces the cultural history of the Choctaws through five distinct periods: aboriginal (pre-1698), colonial contact (1699-1785), treaties (1786-1830), reservation (1831-1906), and modern (1907-69); includes map.


McKee, Jesse O., and Jon A. Schlenker. The Choctaws: Cultural Evolution of a Native American Tribe. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1980. xx, 227 pp.

History of and cultural changes among the Choctaws in Mississippi and in Oklahoma.


McKee, Jesse O. "A Historical Geography of the Areal Shifts in the Mean Point Location of Manufacturing Employment in Mississippi for 1940-1950-1960." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 4 (Nov. 1969): 302-20.

Follows the northward shift of the manufacturing center of the state over two decades; includes tables and maps.


McKee, Jesse O. Mississippi: Portrait of an American State. Montgomery, Ala.: Clairmont, 1995. x, 389 pp.

School textbook.


McKee, Jesse O. "The Utilization of Human Resources: A Spatial Analysis of Manufacturing Employment in Mississippi." Southern Quarterly 8, no. 1 (Oct. 1974): 1-20.

Maps the shift in employment from agriculture to manufacturing since 1940; identifies three core manufacturing areas in the state.


McKee, Shirley Mae. "The Military Career of Earl Van Dorn." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1956. 120 l.

Van Dorn (1820-62) of Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.) graduated from the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) and served in the Mexican War and as a Confederate general until he was shot and killed by a jealous husband during the Civil War.


McKenney, Thomas L., and James Hall. The Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Philadelphia: E.C. Biddle, 1836-44. 3 vols.

Includes color lithograph and biographical sketch of Choctaw Chief Pushmataha (c. 1764-1824).


McKibben, Davidson Burns. "Negro Slave Insurrections in Mississippi, 1800-1865." Journal of Negro History 34, no. 1 (Jan. 1949): 73-94.

Identifies eleven possible slave insurrections, none of which was successful and all of which may have been exaggerated by white fears; three documents relating to the 1835 Madison County conspiracy are appended.


McKinstry, Elma Lois Ray. Wallerville Baptist Church 100th Anniversary: Organized 1854-1954. N.p., n.d. [22] pp.

Brief institutional history of the Union County congregation.


McLaughlin, James Harold. "John R. Lynch the Reconstruction Politician: A Historical Perspective." Ph.D. dissertation, Ball State University, 1981. 228 l.

Argues that the accomplishments of congressman Lynch demonstrate the fitness for office of African American officials during Reconstruction.


McLaurin, Ann M. "The Role of the Dixiecrats in the 1948 Election." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oklahoma, 1972. 319 l.

Analyzes the significance of the renegade anti-civil rights wing that bolted from the Democratic party.


McLemore, Leslie Burl. "The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party: A Case Study of Grass-Roots Politics." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Massachusetts, 1971. xxi, 549 l.

Role of the party, which was organized in 1964 to challenge white control of the state's Democratic Party, in the enfranchisement of Mississippi's African Americans.


McLemore, Nannie Pitts. "James K. Vardaman, a Mississippi Progressive." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 1 (Feb. 1967): 1-11.

Reforms enacted during Vardaman's gubernatorial administration, 1903-11.


McLemore, R.A. "Factionalism: A Fruit of Spanish-American Rivalry on the Mississippi Frontier." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 4 (Oct. 1944): 237-40.

Roots of factionalism found in the administration of Winthrop Sargent, the first territorial governor, 1798-1801.


McLemore, Richard A., and Nannie P. McLemore. "The Beginnings of Jackson County." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 1 (Jan. 1949): 55-64.

Covers county history from discovery to the end of the territorial period.


McLemore, Richard A., and Nannie P. McLemore. "The Birth of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 255-69.

Political background of the 1817 admission of Mississippi to statehood.


McLemore, Richard A. "The Division of Mississippi Territory." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 2 (Apr. 1943): 79-82.

Division of the Mississippi Territory into Mississippi and Alabama in preparation for statehood, 1817.


McLemore, Richard Aubrey. Highlights of Mississippi Baptist History. [Jackson, Miss.]: Mississippi Baptist Historical Commission, 1968. 24 pp.

Calendar of events, 1699-1968; updated in 1990 for a later edition by Jack Winton Gunn.


McLemore, Richard Aubrey, and Nannie Pitts McLemore. "Histories of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 4 (Oct. 1947): 255-64.

Lists general histories, including textbooks, from the early nineteenth century to 1940.


McLemore, Richard Aubrey. A History of Mississippi Baptists, 1780-1970. Jackson, Miss.: Mississippi Baptist Convention Board, 1971. xiii, 386 pp.

Denominational history includes lists of churches, clergy, and early nineteenth-century Mississippi Baptist Association meetings.


McLemore, Richard Aubrey, ed. A History of Mississippi. Hattiesburg: University and College Press of Mississippi, 1973. 2 vols.

Includes "The Geography," by Arthell Kelley; "The Prehistory of Mississippi," by Richard A. Marshall; "The Indians of Mississippi," by Arrell M. Gibson; "Conquistadors, Voyageurs, and Mississippi," by Martha M. Bigelow; "The French Period, 1699-1765," by Walter G. Howell; "British West Florida," by Byrle A. Kynerd; "A Spanish Province, 1779-1798," by Jack D.L. Holmes; "The Formation of the Territory," and the "The Road to Statehood," by Robert V. Haynes; "The Formative Period," by Porter L. Fortune, Jr.; "Flush Times, Depression, War, and Compromise," by John Edmund Gonzales; "Heartland of the Cotton Kingdom," by William K. Scarborough; "Educational Beginnings, 1817-1860," by Aubrey K. Lucas; "Religious and Cultural Life, 1817-1860," by James P. Pillar; "Separation from the Union," by Glover Moore; "The Armed Conflict, 1861-1865," by Edwin C. Bearss; "The Home Front, 1861-1865," and "The Reawakening of Society and Cultural Life, 1865-1890," by John K. Bettersworth; "The Reconstruction of the Commonwealth, 1865-1870," by William C. Harris; "Congressional Reconstruction," by David G. Sansing; "Redeemers, Rednecks, and Racial Integrity," by James G. Revels; "The Mississippi Constitution of 1890 and the Final Decade of the Nineteenth Century," by James P. Coleman; "The Progressive Era," by Nannie Pitts McLemore; "The Triumph of Democracy," by William D. McCain; "Collapse and Recovery," by J. Oliver Emmerich; "World War II and Its Effects, 1940-1948," by John Ray Skates, Jr.; "New Directions in Politics, 1948-1956," by William F. Winter; "Development of Civil Rights, 1956-1970," by Neil R. McMillen; "Agricultural Revolution, 1890-1970," by William L. Giles; "Mississippi Forests," by Nollie W. Hickman; "The Effort to Industrialize," by Ralph J. Rogers; "The Labor Union Movement," by Donald C. Mosley; "Changes in Transportation," by Thomas D. Clark; "Banking, 1890-1970," by Ben B. McNew; "The Growth of the Insurance Industry in Mississippi, 1890-1970," by J. Van Fenstermaker; "Urbanization in Mississippi, 1890-1970," by John N. Burrus; "Lawyers, Courts, and Justice, 1890-1970," by Frank E. Everett, Jr.; "The Public Schools, 1890-1970," by Reuben W. Griffith; "Higher Education in the Twentieth Century," by Richard Aubrey McLemore; "Literature, 1890-1970," by Sarah A. Rouse; "Religion in the Twentieth Century," by Jack W. Gunn; "Cultural Activities in the Twentieth Century," by Joseph W. Kiger; "Medical Services in Mississippi, 1890-1970," by Laura D.S. Harrell; and "Bibliography," by Willie D. Halsell.


McLemore, Richard Aubrey, and Nannie Pitts McLemore. The History of Mississippi College. Jackson, Miss.: Hederman Brothers, 1979. 285 pp.

Sesquicentennial history of the Baptist college in Clinton (Hinds Co.).


McLemore, Richard Aubrey, and Nannie Pitts McLemore. Mississippi Through Four Centuries. Chicago: Laidlaw Brothers, 1945. 448 pp.

Grade school textbook.


McLemore, Richard Aubrey, and Nannie Pitts McLemore. The Mississippi Story. River Forest, Ill.: Laidlaw Brothers, 1969. 416 pp.

Grade school textbook.


McLemore, Richard Aubrey. An Outline of Mississippi History. Hattiesburg, Miss.: the author, 1941. iii, 46 pp.

Outline with selected bibliography emphasizes political history.


McLemore, Richard A. "The Roots of Higher Education in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 3 (Aug. 1964): 207-18.

Development of public and private colleges and universities, 1802-1964.


McLendon, James H. "Ancestry, Early Life, and Education of John A. Quitman." Journal of Mississippi History 10, no. 4 (Oct. 1948): 271-89.

Ends with Quitman's arrival in Ohio in 1819 at the age of twenty-one.


McLendon, James H. "Democratic Presidential Politics in Mississippi, 1952." Mississippi Quarterly 7, no. 1 (Oct. 1953): 15-31.

Democratic in-fighting at the first national convention after the Dixiecrat walkout of 1948.


McLendon, James H. "The Development of Mississippi Agriculture: A Survey." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 2 (Apr. 1951): 75-87.

Brief overview, beginning with Native American farming practices before European settlement.


McLendon, James Hays. "A History of Simpson County, Mississippi, to 1865." M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1936. ix, 191 l.

Includes chapters on geography, Choctaws, white settlement, antebellum prosperity, and the Civil War.


McLendon, James H. "John A. Quitman, Fire-Eating Governor." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 2 (Apr. 1953): 73-89.

Focuses on Quitman's tenure as governor, 1850-51, which was cut short when he was forced to resign because of his impending arrest for violation of the Neutrality Act involving a scheme to annex Cuba as a slave state; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "John A. Quitman," University of Texas, 1949.


McMillan, Edward L. "Religion in Kosciusko." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 3 (July 1951): 146-64.

Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist churches in Attala County, 1830s-1940s; based in part on the author's master's thesis, "A Social and Economic History of Kosciusko, Mississippi," University of Mississippi, 1951.


McMillan, Lucy Mae. "Natchez, 1763-1779." M.A. thesis, University of Virginia, 1938. 72 l.

Narrative of the years of British control of the Natchez District.


McMillen, Neil R. "Black Enfranchisement in Mississippi: Federal Enforcement and Black Protest in the 1960s." Journal of Southern History 43, no. 3 (Aug. 1977): 351-72.

Passage, enforcement, effects, and antecedents of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.


McMillen, Neil R. "Black Journalism in Mississippi: The Jim Crow Years." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 2 (May 1987): 129-38.

Heyday of African American journalism in Mississippi, 1870-1920.


McMillen, Neil R. The Citizens' Council: Organized Resistance to the Second Reconstruction, 1954-1965. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1971. xii, 397 pp.

History of the most powerful anti-civil rights organization in the post-Brown South; chapters two and twelve focus on Mississippi; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Citizens' Council: A History of Organized Southern White Resistance to the Second Reconstruction," Vanderbilt University, 1969.


McMillen, Neil R. Dark Journey: Black Mississippians in the Age of Jim Crow. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989. xvii, 430 pp.

African Americans in Mississippi and the consequences of white racism, 1890-1930; covers politics, education, tenancy and peonage, skilled labor and the professions, law and the courts, lynching, and outmigration, as well as post-Emancipation race relations; winner of the Bancroft Prize.


McMillen, Neil R. "Percy W. Howard: Boss of Black-and-Tan Republicanism in Mississippi, 1924-1960." Journal of Southern History 68, no. 2 (May 1982): 205-24.

Howard, who headed a party that included both whites and African Americans, was an influential lawyer, insurance company president, and Republican national committeeman.


McMillen, Neil R., ed. Remaking Dixie: The Impact of World War II on the American South. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1997. xix, 207 pp.

Symposium papers include "Fighting for What We Didn't Have: How Mississippi's Black Veterans Remember," by Neil R. McMillen; "Faulkner and World War II," by Noel Polk; and "Remembering Hattiesburg: Growing Up Black in Wartime Mississippi," by Arvarh W. Strickland.


McMillin, Carolyn Heard. "A History of the Mississippi Scholastic Press Association." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1985. vi, 271 l.

Organization of secondary school newspaper and yearbook staff members formed at the University of Mississippi in 1947.


McMurry, Daniel, and John N. Burrus. "Mississippi's Population: An Analysis of a Half-Century of Demographic Change." Southern Quarterly 6, no. 1 (Oct. 1967): 45-64.

Illustrates the changing demographics of the state, 1910-60, as the white population exceeded fifty percent by the end of the period.


McMurry, Richard M. "Sherman's Meridian Campaign." Civil War Times Illustrated 14, no. 2 (May 1975): 24-32.

Union attack on railroads at Meridian (Lauderdale Co.), 1864.


McMurtrie, Douglas C. A Bibliography of Mississippi Imprints, 1798-1830. Beauvoir Community, Miss.: The Book Farm, 1945. 168 pp.

Conflates and updates the author's earlier lists: Preliminary Check List of Mississippi Imprints, 1798-1810 (Chicago, 1934), and A Short-Title List of Books, Pamphlets, and Broadsides Printed in Mississippi, 1811 to 1830 (Chicago, 1936), which identify location of copies.


McMurtrie, Douglas C. Pioneer Printing in Mississippi. Atlanta, Ga.: n.p., 1932. 4 pp.

Printers, newspapers, books, and broadsides; originally appeared in the March 1932 issue of Southern Printer.


McNeily, J.S. "The Enforcement Act of 1871 and the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 109-71.

Maintains that Ku Klux Klan violence was exaggerated to encourage passage of the Enforcement Act; includes accounts of the Meridian (Lauderdale Co.) and Artesia (Lowndes Co.) riots of 1871, alleged corruption in the state public school system, and cases prosecuted by U.S. district attorneys.


McNeily, J.S. "From Organization to Overthrow of Mississippi's Provisional Government, 1865-1868." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1 (Centenary Series, 1916): 9-403.

Book-length undocumented narrative of presidential Reconstruction in Mississippi.


McNeily, J.S. "War and Reconstruction in Mississippi, 1863-1890." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (Centenary Series, 1918): 165-535.

Book-length interpretive treatment, liberally sprinkled with primary sources, by a prominent newspaper editor and amateur historian.


McNeily, John S. "Climax and Collapse of Reconstruction in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (1912): 283-474.

Covers Republican Party factionalism; violence in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.), and Clinton (Hinds Co.); taxpayers' convention ; 1875 elections; Mississippi Democratic convention of 1876; impeachment of state officials; and resignation of Governor Adelbert Ames.


McPherson, Hallie Mae. "William McKendree Gwin, Expansionist." Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 1931. vii, 358 l.

Includes extensive coverage of Gwin's years in Mississippi, where he was appointed U.S. marshal by his friend President Andrew Jackson in 1833; also deals with Native American resettlement and the political milieu of the 1830s and 1840s.


McRaney, Joan Warren, and Carolyn Vance Smith, eds. Silhouettes of Settlers: Eight Sketches of Early Natchez Personalities. Natchez, Miss.: Natchez Historical Society, 1974. viii, 144 pp.

Biographical sketches of Hugh Coyle (b. 1768?), William Dunbar (1750/51-1810), William Mercer Green (1798-1887), Seargent Smith Prentiss (1808-50), John Anthony Quitman (1799-1858), Andrew Ellicott (1754-1820), Peter Little (1781-1856), Eliza Ann Low Little (1792-1853), and Manuel Gayoso de Lemos (1747-99).


McWhiney, Grady. "Jefferson Davis and the Art of War." Civil War History 21, no. 2 (June 1975): 101-12.

Origins of Davis's military principles.


McWhiney, Grady. "Jefferson Davis-The Unforgiven." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 2 (May 1980): 113-27.

Evaluates the persistent northern hatred of Davis as reflected in historical literature.


McWhirter, Ollie Dean. "The Work of Miss Susie V. Powell." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1964. 60 l.

Powell organized girls' 4-H clubs and home demonstration clubs in the early twentieth century.


McWilliams, Richebourg Gaillard. "Iberville and the Southern Indians." Alabama Review 20, no. 4 (Oct. 1967): 243-62.

Pierre le Moyne d'Iberville's journal observations of Native Americans on the Gulf Coast, 1699-1702.


Meade, Robert Douthat. "The Relations between Judah P. Benjamin and Jefferson Davis: Some New Light on the Working of the Confederate Machine." Journal of Southern History 5, no. 4 (Nov. 1939): 468-78.

Uses a personal letter from Benjamin to Davis to evaluate the relationship between the secretary of state and the president of the Confederacy.


Meador, Daniel J. "Lamar and the Law at the University of Mississippi." Mississippi Law Journal 34, no. 3 (May 1963): 227-56.

Discusssion of L.Q.C. Lamar's four-year tenure, 1866-70, as professor of law and his law practice in Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Meador, Daniel J. "Lamar to the Court: Last Step to National Reunion." Supreme Court Historical Society Yearbook 11 (1986): 27-47.

Examines the political, sectional, and personal implications of President Grover Cleveland's controversial nomination of L.Q. C. Lamar to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1888.


Measells, Dewitt Talmage, Jr. "History of the Expansion of the University of Mississippi, 1848-1947." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1947. 130 l.

First century of the university; appendices list degrees conferred and names of administrators and identify campus organizations, uses of buildings, and their dates of construction.


Mechelke, Eugene R. "Some Observations on Mississippi's Reconstruction Historiography." Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 1 (Feb. 1971): 21-38.

Concludes that "Radical" Reconstruction did not exist in Mississippi, since it did not affect lasting improvement in the status of African Americans, and that blame cannot be placed solely on Republicans for the corruption, extravagance, and economic problems that did occur.


Meek, Edwin Ernest. "E. Percy Howe's Dollar Democrat: A Frontier Mississippi Newspaper, 1842-1846." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1963 . 120 l.

Small weekly newspaper published by Howe (1814-53), first in Oxford (Lafayette Co.), then in Coffeeville (Yalobusha Co.) and Grenada (Grenada Co.).


Meek, Edwin E. "Eugene Octave Sykes, Member and Chairman of Federal Communications Commission and Federal Radio Commission, 1927-1939." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 4 (Nov. 1974): 377-86.

Former justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court, Sykes was a pioneering member of governmental agencies overseeing the development of the radio industry.


Meek, Edwin Ernest. "WLBT's Interim Operation: An Historical and Analytical Study." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1974. vi, 318 l.

Examines the first year (1973-74) of the station's operation following its conviction for violating the Fairness Doctrine by discriminating against African American viewers.


Melton, Frances Elizabeth. "The Public Career of David Holmes." M.A. thesis, Emory University, 1966. 107 l.

Problems encountered by Holmes (1770-1832) as territorial governor and first governor of the state of Mississippi; see entry under McCain, William D., for explanation of the controversy regarding his plagiarizing of this thesis.


Melton, Maurice. "From Vicksburg to Port Hudson: Porter's River Campaign." Civil War Times Illustrated 12, no. 10 (Feb. 1974): 26-37.

Union Rear Admiral David Porter's plan to have the Queen of the West raid Rebel commerce boats above Vicksburg (Warren Co.), 1863; includes descriptions of skirmishes with the gunboat Vicksburg and other vessels and the final scuttling of the Queen.


Melton, Thomas R. "Mr. Speaker: A Biography of Walter Sillers." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1972. iii, 109 l.

Life of Sillers (b. 1888), powerful speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives, 1944-66.


Melton, Thomas R. "Walter Sillers and National Politics (1948-1964)." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 3 (Aug. 1977): 213-25.

Sillers, state representative from 1916 to 1966 and speaker of the House from 1944 to 1966, opposed civil rights for African Americans; he consequently supported third-party and Republican presidential candidates beginning with the Dixiecrats in 1948.


Menn, Joseph Karl. "The Large Slaveholders of the Deep South, 1860." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1964. 1233 l.

Examines slave holdings, plantations, and the economic significance of the more than six thousand slaveholders in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana who owned more than fifty slaves.


Merideth, Mary Louise. "The Mississippi Woman's Rights Movement, 1889-1923: The Leadership Role of Nellie Nugent Somerville and Greenville in Suffrage Reform." M.A. thesis, Delta State University, 1974. 97 l.

Suffragist work of Somerville (1863-1952), the first woman elected to the Mississippi House of Representatives in 1923.


Messner, William F. "The Vicksburg Campaign of 1862: A Case Study in the Federal Utilization of Black Labor." Louisiana History 16, no. 4 (Fall 1975): 371-81.

Argues that the unsuccessful 1862 Vicksburg (Warren Co.) campaign represented the first time the Union army used slave labor on a large scale.


"Methodists in Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 17 (Mar. 1981): 4-8; 18 (June 1981): 1-2.

Congregations in the county, 1830s-1981.


Metts, D.M. "Origin of Population of De Soto County." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1930. 93 l.

Based on questionnaires, lists country or state of origin of 125 residents.


Middleton, Jeanne Marie. "The History of Singleton v. Jackson Municipal Separate School District: Southern School Desegregation from the Perspective of the Black Community." Ed.D. dissertation, Harvard University, 1978. ix, 165 l.

Effect of the Fifth Circuit ruling of 1966 that mandated desegregation in faculty and staff employment.


Midgette, Nancy Smith. "In Search of Professional Identity: Southern Scientists, 1883-1940." Journal of Southern History 54, no. 4 (Nov. 1988): 597-622.

Enhanced professional status of southern scientists and the related decline of state science academies after World War II; Frederick A.P. Barnard and Eugene Allen Smith of the University of Mississippi are mentioned.


Miers, Earl Schenck. The Web of Victory: Grant at Vicksburg. N.Y.: Knopf, 1955. xiv, 320 pp., xii.

Vicksburg (Warren Co.) Campaign of 1863 from the Union perspective.


Mikel, Linda. "Group Membership and Migrant Destination Choice: A Comparison of Negro and White Migrants from Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Indiana University, 1970. 101 l.

Destinations and motivations of African Americans and whites who left the state, 1955-60.


Milani, Ernesto R. "Peonage at Sunnyside and the Reaction of the Italian Government." Arkansas Historical Quarterly 50, no. 1 (Spring 1991): 30-39.

In 1898, Greenville (Washington Co.) investors, including Senator Leroy Percy, leased one of the largest cotton plantations in the Arkansas Delta and enticed Italians to immigrate and work under rental agreements that amounted to debt peonage; reprinted in Shadows Over Sunnyside: An Arkansas Plantation in Transition, 1830-1945, edited by Jeannie M. Whayne (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993).


Milanich, Jerald T., and Susan Milbrath, eds. First Encounters: Spanish Explorations in the Caribbean and the United States, 1492-1570. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1989. 222 pp.

Includes heavily illustrated article by Charles Hudson, Chester B. DePratter, and Marion T. Smith, "Hernando de Soto's Expedition through the Southern United States," which provides an updated reconstruction of de Soto's route through the Southeast, including northern Mississippi.


Miles, Edwin A. "Andrew Jackson and Senator George Poindexter." Journal of Southern History 24, no. 1 (Feb. 1958): 51-66.

Details the bitter political and personal feud between the two men.


Miles, Edwin A. "Franklin E. Plummer: Piney Woods Spokesman of the Jackson Era." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no.1 (Jan. 1952): 1-34.

Rise and fall of Plummer, who served as a congressman from Mississippi from 1831 to 1836.


Miles, Edwin Arthur. Jacksonian Democracy in Mississippi. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1960. James Sprunt Studies in History and Political Science. 192 pp.

Political history, 1820s-30s, covers the Constitution of 1832, economic boom and bust, the 1836 presidential candidacy of Martin Van Buren, and controversies over state banks, the tariff, states' rights, and land speculation; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, University of North Carolina, 1954.


Miles, Edwin A. "Joseph Seawell Jones of Shocco-Historian and Humbug." North Carolina Historical Review 34, no. 4 (Oct. 1957): 483-506.

Includes account of an 1839 Mississippi bank hoax, in which prankster Jones (1811-55) posed as a representative of the Bank of the Cape Fear and as an agent of the U.S. Treasury.


Miles, Edwin A. "The Mississippi Press in the Jackson Era, 1824-1841." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 1 (Jan. 1957): 1-20.

Growing role of newspapers in influencing the electorate, particularly after 1832.


Miles, Edwin. "The Mississippi Slave Insurrection Scare of 1835." Journal of Negro History 42, no. 1 (Jan. 1957): 48-60.

Rumors of a slave uprising on the Yazoo River near Livingston (Madison Co.) and the ensuing brief retaliatory reign of terror.


Miles, Edwin Arthur. "Robert J. Walker-His Mississippi Years." M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina, 1949. ii, 190 l.

Covers the pre-1846 career of Walker (1801-69) as a land speculator and U.S. senator.


Miles, Loyce Braswell. "Duncan, Mississippi: The Origins and Survival of a Town." Journal of the Bolivar County Historical Society 5-7 (Mar. 1983): 11-57.

History of a tiny Delta community, 1880-1980.


Miller, Alice Marilyn. "The First Baptist Church of Starkville, Mississippi." M.S. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1955. 135 l.

Institutional history of the Oktibbeha County congregation, founded in 1839.


Miller, Clark Leonard. "'Let Us Die to Make Men Free': Political Terrorism in Post-Reconstruction Mississippi, 1877-1896." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Minnesota, 1983. 2 vols.

Post-Reconstruction political history focuses on Republican efforts to reclaim state government and Democratic tactics to retain political control.


Miller, Gene Ramsey. "A History of the First Methodist Church of Starkville, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1962. 88 l.

Institutional history, 1835-1962.


Miller, Gene Ramsey. A History of North Mississippi Methodism, 1820-1900. Nashville, Tenn.: Parthenon Press, 1966. 158 pp.

History of the early years of the North Mississippi Conference includes list of assignments of pastors.


Miller, James David. "South by Southwest: Planter Emigration and Elite Ideology in the Deep South, 1815-1861." Ph.D. dissertation, Emory University, 1996. 415 l.

Reasons for westward relocation of slaveholders in the antebellum period and implications for the states to which they emigrated; Mississippi, for example, gained planters from the Atlantic Coast South and lost them, in turn, to states farther west.


Miller, John. "From Hot Coffee to Cold Springs: A Place-Name Study of Covington County, Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 9, no. 4 (Winter 1975): 177-88.

Origins of names of communities and bodies of water.


Miller, Margaret E. "Mississippi Women of the Confederacy." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1963. 84 l.

Volunteer work performed and privations suffered by Mississippi women during the Civil War.


Miller, Michael Wayne. "The American Camp Ground Community: An Urban Nucleus as Basis for Community Planning." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1996. xiii, 282 l.

Chapter seven, "A Southern Camp Ground Community: Neshoba County Fair, Mississippi," includes brief history of the fair since 1889.


Miller, Randall M., and John R. McGivigan, eds. The Moment of Decision: Biographical Essays on American Character and Regional Identity. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1994. xi, 233 pp.

Includes "The Percy Family, the 'Adamses' of the Deep South: A Study of Creative Melancholy," by Bertram Wyatt-Brown, which compares the Percys to the Adams family of Massachusetts.


Miller, Rush G. "John G. Jones: Pioneer Circuit Rider and Historian." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 1 (Feb. 1977): 17-39.

Life of Jones (1804-88), an important figure in the rise of Methodism in Mississippi and author of an early history of the denomination in the state.


Miller, Rush G. "Methodist Circuit Riders in the Mississippi Delta." Journal of the Bolivar County Historical Society 4 (Mar. 1980): 3-8.

Brief undocumented look at traveling preachers, 1830s-1880.


Miller, William D. "E.H. Crump: Family Background and Early Life." Tennessee Historical Quarterly 20, no. 4 (Dec. 1961): 364-80.

Holly Springs (Marshall Co.) background of "Boss" Crump (1874-1954) of Memphis; includes genealogical information.


Milligan, John D. Gunboats Down the Mississippi. Annapolis, Md.: United States Naval Institute, 1965. xxvi, 217 pp.

Union effort to control the Mississippi River, culminating in the Siege of Vicksburg (Warren Co.), 1863.


Mills, Frances Preston. "Amos Ogden of the Ogden's Mandamus, Late Captain of the Rangers." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 2 (May 1979): 183-98.

Life of Ogden (1732-74) and the history of the family plantation in Adams County.


Mills, Gary B. "New Life for the River of Death: Development of the Yazoo River Basin, 1873-1977." Journal of Mississippi River 41, no. 4 (Nov. 1979): 287-300.

Federal efforts to control flooding and improve navigation in the area, which includes more than thirteen thousand square miles from Vicksburg (Warren Co.) to the Tennessee border.


Mills, Gwen Ann. "A Social History of Jackson, Mississippi, 1920-29." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1966. 142 l.

Entertainment, religion, and education, including the city's support of Governor Theodore G. Bilbo's unsuccessful attempt to move the University of Mississippi from Oxford (Lafayette Co.) to Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Mills, Kay. This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer. N.Y.: Dutton, 1993. xv, 390 pp.

Biography of the Ruleville (Sunflower Co.) civil rights activist (1917-77) who first came to national attention when she addressed the credentials committee of the Democratic National Convention in 1964; book won the Julia Cherry Spruill Award.


Mills, Nicolaus. Like a Holy Crusade: Mississippi 1964-The Turning of the Civil Rights Movement in America. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1992. 222 pp.

History of the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project portrays the mammoth voter registration effort as a watershed in the civil rights movement that demonstrated the effectiveness of interracial cooperation and prepared the way for the Voting Rights Act of 1965.


Milne, John A. "Early Mississippi Physicians." Journal of Mississippi History 18, no. 3 (July 1956): 157-74.

Focuses on the lives of doctors D.L. Phares and John Wesley Monette; also includes description of common diseases and public health conditions in Mississippi prior to the 1830s.


Minter, David. William Faulkner: His Life and Work. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980. xvi, 325 pp.

Briefer than the standard Blotner biography.


Mississippi State Highway Department. Out of the Mud: The Story of Mississippi's Roadways. Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Department, 1972. [16] pp.

Undocumented booklet provides sketchy history of highway development, 1799-1972.


Mississippi Mindscape: Historical and Literary Links Between People, Places, and Traditions. Jackson: Mississippi Committee for the Humanities, 1986. 8 booklets.

Booklets, bound together: Place, by David Sansing and Michael P. Dean; Education, by Ronald W. Bailey and Mabel H. Pittman; Movement, by Roy V. Scott and Thomas Price Caldwell; Personalities, by Martha H. Wilkins and C. William Durrett; Turning Points, by John Ray Skates and Noel Polk; Rituals, by Joanne V. Hawks and Maryemma Graham; Taproots, by Charles D. Lowery and Robert L. Phillips; and Trials, by Dennis Mitchell and Nancy D. Hargrove.


Mitcham, Howard. "Old Rodney: A Mississippi Ghost Town." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 4 (Oct. 1953): 242-51.

Anecdotal history of Petit Gulf, later named Rodney (Jefferson Co.).


Mitchell, Dennis. "Frank E. Smith: Mississippi Liberal." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 2 (May 1986): 85-104.

Controversial career of the congressman from Greenwood (Leflore Co.).


Mitchell, Dennis. "Frank Ellis Smith: An Intellectual Journey." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 1 (Feb. 1990): 23-40.

Traces the intellectual influences leading to congressman Smith's outspoken rejection of racial segregation.


Mitchell, Martha Carolyn. "Health and the Medical Profession in the Lower South, 1845-1860." Journal of Southern History 10, no. 4 (Nov. 1944): 424-446.

Medical schools, climate, endemic diseases, hygiene, and nutrition in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama.


Mitford, Jessica. A Fine Old Conflict. N.Y.: Knopf, 1977.

Chapter eight reveals the involvement of the American Communist Party in the fight to save convicted rapist Willie McGee from the electric chair, 1951. xiv, 333 pp., [4].


Moak, Franklin E. A History of the Alumni Association of the University of Mississippi. University: Alumni Association of the University of Mississippi, 1986. 272 pp.

History of the organization includes lists of association officers, student government officers, and awards.


Mohn, Ida Harlene. "The Tennessee Valley Authority in Northeast Mississippi." M.S. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1952. 112 l.

Activities of the government agency since the New Deal, particularly in Tishomingo County.


Mollison, Irvin C. "Negro Lawyers in Mississippi." Journal of Negro History 15, no. 1 (Jan. 1930): 38-71.

First (1873-1900) and second (1900-17) generations of African American lawyers; blames the subsequent decline in numbers on an increasingly harsh racial climate, economic disasters, and African American outmigration.


Moncrief, Sandra. "The Mississippi Married Women's Property Act of 1839." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 2 (May 1985): 110-25.

Reviews debate surrounding the bill, an early attempt to secure and expand women's rights; includes discussion of lawsuits involving Betsy Love Allen and Piety Smith Hadley.


Monette, John W. History of the Discovery and Settlement of the Valley of the Mississippi by the Three Great European Powers, Spain, France, and Great Britain, and the Subsequent Occupation, Settlement, and Extension of Civil Government by the United States until the Year 1846. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1846. 2 vols.

Earliest history of the Mississippi River Valley; scattered chapters throughout both volumes contain information about the area that became the state of Mississippi.


Monette, John W. "The Mississippi Floods." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 427-78.

Intended as a chapter in Monette's never-published Physical Geography and History of the Mississippi Valley; describes sixteen "extraordinary floods" between 1782 and 1850.


Monroe County Book Committee. A History of Monroe County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media Corp., 1988. iii, 968 pp.

History of towns, churches, houses, and families.


Montague, Billie. "The Mississippi Election of 1875." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1937. 133 l.

Traditional account of the election that ended Reconstruction in Mississippi.


Montgomery, Goode. "Alleged Secession of Jones County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 13-22.

Traces the origin of the fictitious legend of the "Free State of Jones" to an article by G. Norton Galloway, "A Confederacy within a Confederacy," in the Magazine of American History (1886).


Montgomery, James Marvin. "The Raids of Forrest and Van Dorn Against Grant's Line of Supply During December, 1962." M.A. thesis, Emory University, 1960. vi, 97 l.

Argues that Confederate raids in West Tennessee and North Mississippi indirectly contributed to the attack on Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1863 by convincing General U.S. Grant that his troops could likely supply themselves by foraging in the area.


Montgomery, Joe Pressly. "Union Sentiment in the Tombigbee Prairie of Mississippi, 1851-1861." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1971. 60 l.

Whig and Union Democratic opposition to secession in the Black Prairie counties of Chickasaw, Lowndes, Monroe, Noxubee, Oktibbeha, and Pontotoc.


Moody, V. Alton. "Early Religious Efforts in the Lower Mississippi Valley." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 22, no. 2 (Sept. 1935): 161-76.

Includes several pages on establishing activities of Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, and Episcopalians in the Natchez (Adams Co.) area, 1780-1844.


Moon, Rhonda Marie. "Becker Is the Name." Journal of Monroe County History 3 (1977): 50-53.

History of the community.


Mooney, Timothy. "Many Choctaw Standing: An Archaeological Study of Culture Change in the Early Historic Period." M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina, 1994. viii, 119 l.

Analysis of material goods, especially ceramics, at seven sites in Mississippi demonstrates that Choctaw culture persisted despite European influences.


Mooney, Tim. "Migration of the Chickasawhays into the Choctaw Homeland." Mississippi Archaeology 27, no. 2 (Dec. 1992): 28-39.

Contends that the migration took place in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.


Moore, Clarence B. Certain Mounds of Arkansas and of Mississippi. Philadelphia: P.C. Stockhausen, 1908. 480 pp.

Describes and locates many archaeological sites on the lower Yazoo, lower Sunflower, and Mississippi rivers.


Moore, Edith Wyatt. Natchez Under-the-Hill. Natchez, Miss.: Southern Historical Publications, 1958. 131 pp.

History of the Adams County river port beneath the bluffs of the city focuses on the sensational: a massacre, a raid, an earthquake, a tornado, landslides, epidemics, floods, crime, war, and boat wrecks.


Moore, J. Preston. "Jefferson Davis and Ambrose Dudley Mann." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 3 (July 1957): 137-53.

Examines the "extraordinary friendship" between the two men; Mann was a diplomat Davis met when he was secretary of war in the Pierce cabinet.


Moore, John Hebron. Agriculture in Ante-Bellum Mississippi. N.Y.: Bookman, 1958. 268 pp.

Covers the establishment of cotton as the state's staple crop, the development of Petit Gulf hybrid cotton, the agricultural reform movement and the growth of scientific farming, the depression of 1837-49, and the role of the Mississippi Agricultural Bureau in promoting secession; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Mississippi Agriculture, 1770-1860," Emory University, 1955.


Moore, John Hebron. Andrew Brown and Cypress Lumbering in the Old Southwest. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1967. xi, 180 pp.

Career of Brown (1793-1871), who was born in Scotland and founded one of Natchez's (Adams Co.) most successful mills, later known as the R.F. Learned Lumber Mill.


Moore, John Hebron, ed. "Claiborne's 'Journalism in Mississippi': A Fragment from the Unpublished Second Volume of His History of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 2 (Apr. 1960): 87-100.

Reprints the 1882 address of John F.H. Claiborne to the state press association; believed to be a brief version of chapter twenty-four of the lost manuscript of the second (unpublished) volume of his history of Mississippi.


Moore, John H. "Cotton Breeding in the Old South." Agricultural History 30, no. 3 (July 1956): 95-104.

Award-winning article reviews development of improved breeds by Natchez (Adams Co.) and Vicksburg (Warren Co.) area growers, including William Dunbar, Dr. Rush Nutt, Henry V. Vick, and Martin Philips.


Moore, John Hebron. "Economic Conditions in Mississippi on the Eve of the Civil War." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 3 (July 1960): 167-78.

Reviews the improvement in economic conditions from 1850 to 1860 and concludes that cotton prosperity, the John Brown raid, and the election of Abraham Lincoln all contributed to secession.


Moore, John Hebron. "John Hebron of LaGrange Plantation: Commercial Fruit Grower of the Old South." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 4 (Nov. 1984): 281-303.

Life of Hebron (1802-62) of Warren County, including his early years in Virginia, his successful plantation, and his Whig and anti-secessionist political views.


Moore, John Hebron. "Local and State Governments of Antebellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 2 (May 1982): 104-34.

Reveals that state government was interested in internal improvements and banks but lacked enforcement power, leaving local governments free to ignore state legislation they did not support.


Moore, John Hebron. "Mississippi's Ante-Bellum Textile Industry." Journal of Mississippi History 16, no. 2 (Apr. 1954): 81-98.

Demonstrates that the industry in Mississippi never fully recovered after the damaging Civil War years.


Moore, John Hebron. "Railroads of Antebellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 1 (Feb. 1979): 53-81.

Traces the advent of railroads, 1830s-50s.


Moore, John Hebron. "Simon Gray, Riverman: A Slave Who Was Almost Free." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 49, no. 3 (Dec. 1962): 472-84.

Details the unusual level of responsibility entrusted to Gray, a "quasi-free" slave who served as chief boatman for the cypress lumbering firm of Andrew Brown and Company of Natchez, 1845-61.


Moore, John Hebron. "Two Cotton Kingdoms." Agricultural History 60, no. 4 (Fall 1986): 1-16.

Argues that agricultural practices differed not so much between the Upper South and the Deep South as between the Lower Mississippi River counties and the remainder of the South.


Moore, John Hebron. "William H. Mason, Southern Industrialist." Journal of Southern History 27, no. 2 (May 1961): 169-83.

Reviews the career of the founder of the Masonite Corporation of Laurel (Jones Co.) and observes that his invention of the hardboard product in the 1920s helped to revolutionize the lumber industry and save South Mississippi from economic ruin when the virgin pine forests were depleted.


Moore, John H., and Margaret D. Moore. Mississippi: A Student's Guide to Localized History. N.Y.: Teachers College Press, Columbia University, 1969. 32 pp.

Overview of the state's history includes brief bibliographies.


Moore, Margaret DesChamps. "Protestantism in the Mississippi Territory." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 358-70.

Work of early Methodist, Baptist, and Presbyterian clergymen among a largely unchurched population, 1798-1817.


Moore, Margaret DesChamps. "Religion in Mississippi in 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 4 (Oct. 1960): 223-38.

Dramatic increase in Protestant church membership and influence, 1817-60.


Moore, Ross H. "Social and Economic Conditions in Mississippi during Reconstruction." Ph.D. dissertation, 1938. vii, 388 l.

Focuses particularly on Jackson (Hinds Co.) and the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta; covers postwar government, agriculture and the decline of the African American worker population, business and industry, education, religion, recreation, and transportation.


Moore, Ross H. "The Vicksburg Campaign of 1863." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 3 (July 1939): 151-68.

Analyzes Confederate strategy and affixes blame for the loss of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) on Jefferson Davis and generals John C. Pemberton and Joseph E. Johnston; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, University of Chicago, 1928.


Moore, Thomas Lane, III. "The Mississippi Democratic Primary of July, 1946: A Case Study." M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1966. 99 l.

Incumbent Theodore G. Bilbo's senatorial campaign, which drew national attention and set the stage for the U.S.Senate's investigation and subsequent refusal to seat him.


Moreland, Laurence W., Robert P. Steed, and Tod A Baker, eds. The 1988 Presidential Election in the South: Continuity Amidst Change in Southern Party Politics. N.Y.: Praeger, 1991. xiv, 296 pp.

Includes "Mississippi: Electoral Conflict in a Nationalized State," by Stephen D. Shaffer.


Moreland, Laurence W., Robert P. Steed, and Tod A Baker, eds. Blacks in Southern Politics. N.Y.: Praeger, 1987. ix, 305 pp.

Includes "White Violence and the Civil Rights Movement," by David C. Colby, which analyzes over one thousand acts of violence against civil rights workers in Mississippi during the 1960s, and "Blacks' Political Representation in Rural Mississippi," by Theodore J. Davis, Jr., which examines the increasing numbers of African American elected officials in the state by 1984.


Morgan, Chester M. "At the Crossroads: World War II, Delta Agriculture, and Modernization in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 4 (Winter 1995): 353-71.

Assesses the extent of permanent change in the state's political and economic culture brought about by the war.


Morgan, Chester M. Dearly Bought, Deeply Treasured: The University of Southern Mississippi, 1912-1987. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1987. 181 pp.

Heavily illustrated history of the evolution of the university from its beginnings as Mississippi Normal College in Hattiesburg (Forrest Co.)


Morgan, Chester M. "Oral History in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 1 (Feb. 1989): 31-42.

Projects sponsored by state institutions, local libraries, historical societies, and private entities.


Morgan, Chester, and Donald M. Dana, Jr. A Priceless Heritage: The Story of Mississippi Power Company. Gulfport, Miss.: Mississippi Power Company, 1993. xiv, 242 pp.

Authorized business history follows the varying fortunes of the company since 1924.


Morgan, Chester M. Redneck Liberal: Theodore G. Bilbo and the New Deal. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1985. xi, 274 pp.

Bilbo's support of New Deal policies during his first term in the U.S. Senate (1935-41), his conflicts with fellow senator Pat Harrison, the effect of Bilbo's demagogic style on other New Dealers, and the origin of his racist reputation; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Demagogue or Democrat: Theodore G. Bilbo and the New Deal," Memphis State University, 1982.


Morgan, Chester M. "Senator Theodore G. Bilbo, the New Deal, and Mississippi Politics (1934-1940)." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 3 (Aug. 1985): 147-64.

Argues that state politics moved from single-party factionalism in the early 1930s to class-oriented politics during the New Deal years.


Morgan, Emory Alex. "Monroe County and the Civil War." Journal of Monroe County History 14 (1988): 2-16.

Brief narrative based on a handful of published sources on Civil War action in North Mississippi.


Morgan, Madel. "Mississippi State Auditor's Warrants Issued to Revolutionary War Pensioners." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 1 (Feb. 1970): 75-80.

Lists tax-exempt pension payments to Revolutionary War veterans living in Mississippi, 1839-50.


Morgan, Madel Jacobs. "Sarah Truly, a Mississippi Tory." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 1 (Feb. 1975): 87-95.

Life of a Natchez loyalist (d. 1792).


Morgan, Ruth Basinger. A Place Called Darracott. Aberdeen, Miss.: Allmond Printing, 1978. 88 pp.

Brief history of the Monroe County community; emphasizes genealogy.


Morris, Cheryl H. "Choctaw and Chickasaw Indian Agents, 1831-1874." Chronicles of Oklahoma 50, no. 4 (Winter 1972-73): 415-36.

Discusses the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek and profiles fifteen Indian agents, including Mississippian Douglas H. Cooper (1815-79).


Morris, Christopher Charles. Becoming Southern: The Evolution of a Way of Life, Warren County and Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1770-1860. N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1994. 336 pp.

Quantitative study divides the development of the area into two distinct periods and argues that only after 1810 did cotton and slavery dominate the local economy; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Town and Country in the Old South: Vicksburg and Warren County, Mississippi," University of Florida, 1991.


Morris, H. Gil. "The Natchez Planters: A Study in Economic and Political Conservatism, 1798-1860." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1977. v, 87 l.

Political history of the southwestern counties in the antebellum years; argues that Mississippi's vote for secession represented the triumph of the lower classes over the planter class.


Morris, Willie. The Courting of Marcus Dupree. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1983. 452 pp.

University of Oklahoma's efforts to sign high school football star Dupree (b. 1964) of Philadelphia (Neshoba Co.).


Morrison, J.K. "Early History of Jefferson College." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 179-88.

Legal and financial difficulties encountered by the Washington (Adams Co.) school, 1802-29.


Morrison, Minion K.C. Black Political Mobilization: Leadership, Power, and Mass Behavior. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1987. xix, 303 pp.

Political analysis of three Mississippi towns with African Americans mayors and other evidence of significant minority political control: Bolton (Hinds Co.), Tchula (Holmes Co.), and Mayersville (Issaquena Co.).


Morse, W. Eugene. "'Judge' William Hemingway, 1869-1937." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 4 (Nov. 1974): 339-51.

Life of a mayor of Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Morse, William Eugene. "The Fight of Jefferson Davis over the Will of His Brother, Joseph E. Davis, for His Home, 'Brierfield.'" Journal of Mississippi History 33, no. 2 (May 1971): 141-48.

Chronicles the postbellum efforts of Jefferson Davis to gain possession of his brother's plantation near Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Mosely, Donald C. "Holt Ross, the Second President of the Mississippi State Federation of Labor." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 3 (Aug. 1972): 237-46.

Ross's presidency, 1924-31, featured efforts to organize unions and enact workers' compensation.


Mosely, Donald Crumpton. "A History of Labor Unions in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Alabama, 1965. 395 l.

History of organized labor in the state, including farmers' organizations and the Knights of Labor; explains the state's historically low union membership.


Mosley, Mrs. Charles C. The Negro in Mississippi History. Jackson, Miss.: Hederman, 1950. 151 pp.

Based largely on published histories of the state.


Moss, Henry Herbert. "Sectionalism in Mississippi, 1817-1832." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1934. v, 110 l.

Explains political conflict based on socio-economic differences between residents of the Pearl River counties of Central and South-Central Mississippi and the Mississippi River counties of the Delta and the old Natchez District.


Moss, Warner. "Governor Alexander G. McNutt (1802-1848)." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 3 (Aug. 1980): 244-51.

McNutt wrote the anonymous "Turkey Runner" stories.


Mounger, Dwyn Mecklin. "Lynching in Mississippi, 1830-1930." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1961. 135 l.

Traces the origin of lynching to the antebellum era, when such violence was used against slave rebellion plotters, gamblers, and abolitionists, but rarely against slaves.


Mowry, George E. "Notes and Documents: The South and the Progressive Lily White Party of 1912." Journal of Southern History 6, no. 2 (237-47).

Theodore Roosevelt's belief that a strong Progressive Party in the South must be "lily white"; includes mention of the all-white Mississippi delegation at the Chicago convention.


Muldowny, John. "The Administration of Jefferson Davis as Secretary of War." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale University, 1959. vi, 392 l.

Davis's tenure as secretary of war under President Franklin Pierce, 1853-57.


Muldowny, John. "Jefferson Davis: The Postwar Years." Mississippi Quarterly 23, no. 1 (Winter 1969-70): 17-33.

Covers Davis's flight from Richmond, his imprisonment, writings, family crises, health, and celebrity status.


Mullins, Andrew P., Jr. Building Consensus: A History of the Passage of the Mississippi Education Reform Act of 1982. N.p.: the author, 1992. 213 pp.

Argues that Governor William Winter built a statewide consensus, 1980-82, to enact unprecedented educational reform; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "A History of the Mississippi Education Reform Act of 1982," University of Mississippi, 1992.


Murphree, Dennis. "Hurricane and Brierfield: The Davis Plantations." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 2 (Apr. 1947): 98-107.

A former governor of Mississippi writes of his pre-1932 visit to the ruins of Jefferson Davis's Brierfield Plantation on Palmyra Island south of Vicksburg (Warren Co.), and to nearby Hurricane Plantation, home of Davis's elder brother Joseph.


Murphy, James B. L.Q.C. Lamar: Pragmatic Patriot. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1973. 294 pp.

Biography of Lamar (1825-93), congressman, U.S. senator, and U.S. Supreme Court justice; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Louisiana State University, 1968.


Murrah, W.B. "Origin and Location of Millsaps College." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 227-31.

Early history, 188-92, of the Methodist college in Jackson (Hinds Co.), written by the college's first president.


Murray, Donald M., and Robert M. Rodney. "Colonel Julian E. Bryant: Champion of the Negro Soldier." Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society 61 (Summer 1963): 257-81.

Bryant (1836-65) of Illinois, nephew of New York Evening Post editor William Cullen Bryant, headed the 1st Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, African Descent, later renamed the 51st U.S. Colored Infantry, which fought at the Battle of Milliken's Bend in 1863.


Murray, Elizabeth Dunbar. Early Romances of Historic Natchez. Natchez, Miss.: Natchez Printing and Stationery, 1938. 84 pp.

Undocumented accounts of fifteen romances involving Natchez (Adams Co.) residents or visitors, including John James Audubon, Andrew Jackson, Aaron Burr, John A. Quitman, Seargent Prentiss, and Jefferson Davis.


Muse, Benjamin. The American Negro Revolution: From Nonviolence to Black Power. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1968. xii, 345 pp.

Chapters nine and ten deal with Freedom Summer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party's credentials challenge at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey.


Myer, William E. Indian Trails of the Southeast. Nashville, Tenn.: Blue and Gray, 1971. xii, 132 pp.

Reprint of part of Bulletin 42 (1928), Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution, includes material on the Natchez Trace; the West Tennessee Chickasaw Trail; the Memphis, Pontotoc, and Mobile Bay Trail; the Middle Memphis-Pontotoc Trail; the Cherokee Trace; Gaines's Trace; and the trail from Natchez to the Lower Creeks.


Nabors, S.M., comp. History of Old Tishomingo County. N.p., 1940. 108 pp.

History, covering 1836 to 1940, of the area that now encompasses Tishomingo, Alcorn, and Prentiss counties; emphasizes government, schools, churches, and the Civil War.


Nail, Ken, Jr. The Way I Heard It (A History of Calhoun County). N.p.: Calhoun County School District, 1975. iii, 240 pp., [iii].

Uses interviews, stories, and letters to portray the early history of the county, including information on the Civil War, towns, and prominent citizens, especially Governor Dennis Murphree.


Namarato, Michael V. "A New Perspective on an Old Problem: History from the Bottom Up-Lafayette County, Mississippi." Essays in Economic and Business History 13 (1995): 129-39.

Reports that preliminary research in county records indicates that Lafayette County's post-Civil War economic development may not have conformed to models proposed by southern economic historians of the 1970s and 1980s.


Napier, John H., III. "Judge Edward McGehee, Cotton Planter, Pioneer Manufacturer and Mississippi Philanthropist." Cotton History Review 1, no. 1 (1960): 27-28.

Brief biographical sketch of McGehee (1786-1880) of Woodville (Wilkinson Co.), owner of the Woodville Factory cotton and woolen mill.


Napier, John Hawkins, III. Lower Pearl River's Pineywoods: Its Land and Its People. University, Miss.: Center for the Study of Southern Culture, 1985. 227 pp.

Economic and environmental history of Pearl River and Hancock counties; includes extensive treatment of the town of Picayune and of the Crosby family, owners of Crosby Forest Products Company.


Nash, Evelyn Melvena. "The Predominantly Black College: Changing the Role, Meeting the Challenge." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Kansas, 1981. vii, 164 l.

Examines past, present, and future roles of Jackson State University (Hinds Co.), which was founded in 1877 as Natchez Seminary.


Natchez, Mississippi, U.S.A.: Historic City of America. Natchez, Miss.: Natchez Printing and Stationery, n.d. 16 pp.

Brief historical sketches, descriptions, and some photographs of houses and sites.


Neff, Guy Charles. "The Historical Geography of Hattiesburg, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1968. 90 l.

Importance of lumber, railroads, and the University of Southern Mississippi to the city's growth, 1884-1968; also describes the deterioration of the inner city toward the end of the period.


Neitzel, Robert S. Archaeology of the Fatherland Site: The Grand Village of the Natchez. N.Y.: American Museum of Natural History, 1965. Archaeological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History no. 51, part 1. 124 pp.

Report of the 1962 re-excavation of the Natchez Indian village site on St. Catherine's Creek (Adams Co.); includes analysis of artifacts, plant and animal remains, and comparison of historical and archaeological evidence.


Neitzel, Robert S. The Grand Village of the Natchez Revisited: Excavation at the Fatherland Site, Adams County, Mississippi, 1972. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1983. 183 pp.

Illustrated report on the 1972 excavations; sequel to the author's report (American Museum of Natural History) on the 1962 excavations.


Neitzel, Robert S. "The Natchez Grand Village." Florida Anthropologist 17, no. 2 (1964): 63-66.

Report on the 1962 excavation of a Natchez Indian village site located near St. Catherine's Creek (Adams Co.).


Nelson, Benjamin. Tennessee Williams: The Man and His Work. N.Y.: Ivan Obolensky, 1961. xi, 304 pp.

Critical biography of playwright Thomas Lanier Williams III (1911-83); based on the author's master's thesis at Columbia University.


Nelson, Jack. Terror in the Night: The Klan's Campaign Against the Jews. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 1993. 287 pp.

Bulk of the book concerns the FBI's response to the Ku Klux Klan's 1967 bombings of Jewish targets in Jackson (Hinds Co.); includes recounting of the ambush and shooting in Meridian (Lauderdale Co.) of bombers Kathy Ainsworth and Thomas Albert Tarrants, III.


Nelson, Lawrence J. "The Art of the Possible: Another Look at the 'Purge' of the AAA Liberals in 1935." Agricultural History 57, no. 4 (Oct. 1983): 416-35.

Role of Oscar Goodbar Johnston, first finance director of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, in the dismissal of several liberals in the AAA's Legal Division.


Nelson, Lawrence J. King Cotton's Advocate: Oscar G. Johnston and the New Deal. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1999. 352 pp.

Examines role of Johnston (1880-1955) as president, 1927-50, of the world's largest cotton plantation (Delta and Pine Land Company of Bolivar County), and as finance director, 1933-38, of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "King Cotton's Advocate: The Public and Private Career of Oscar G. Johnston," University of Missouri-Columbia, 1972.


Nelson, Lawrence J. "Oscar Johnston, the New Deal, and the Cotton Subsidy Payments Controversy, 1936-1937." Journal of Southern History 40, no. 3 (Aug. 1974): 300-416.

Details an early example of controversial "agribusiness" subsidies: AAA crop reduction payments made to the huge Delta and Pine Land Company (Bolivar Co.), which was owned by a British cotton mill corporation and managed by Mississippi native Johnston.


Nelson, Lawrence J. "Welfare Capitalism on a Mississippi Plantation in the Great Depression." Journal of Southern History 50, no. 2 (May 1984): 225-50.

Describes the operation of the Delta and Pine Land Company of Scott (Bolivar Co.); emphasizes profit-maximizing social welfare measures undertaken by its president Oscar Johnston to benefit the approximately ten thousand tenant families living on the plantation.


Nelson, Mary Lee. "Benevolent Aspects of the 'Peculiar Institution' in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 71 l.

Reviews arguments of antebellum slavery apologists (Matthew Estes, Henry Hughes, E.N. Elliott, P.R. Leatherman, and the Rev. James Smylie) and of postbellum memoirists (Susan Dabney Smedes and Belle Kearney).


Nerren, Guy Benjamin. "The Origin and Development of Voluntary, Non-Profit Health Insurance in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1954. 120 l.

Traces the origins and early history of Mississippi Blue Cross-Blue Shield, 1933-54.


Ness, Gary Clifford. The States' Rights Democratic Movement of 1948." Ph.D. dissertation, Duke University, 1972. 284 l.

Case study of the 1948 Dixiecrats under South Carolina governor J. Strom Thurmond and Mississippi governor Fielding L. Wright.


Nevious, Kristin Dollase. "The Law of Libel and Public Speech in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina: A Content Analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, 1992. 242 l.

Analysis of Deep South state supreme court opinions, 1925-89, argues that the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in New York Times v. Sullivan (1964) was a watershed in free speech decisions.


Newbery, Robert Stephen. "John Roy Lynch, a Political Biography." M.A. thesis, University of Wisconsin, 1971. iv, 150 l.

Career of African American congressman Lynch (1847-1939).


Newell, Mrs. Samuel H., Jr. "Dr. Jeremiah Chamberlain and Oakland College." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 4 (Nov. 1964): 322-24.

Murder of the president of Oakland College (now contained within the campus of Alcorn State University in Claiborne/Jefferson counties) in 1851.


Newman, Mark. "Hazel Brannon Smith and Holmes County, Mississippi, 1936-1964: The Making of a Pulitzer Prize Winner." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 1 (Feb. 1992): 59-87.

Evolution of the racial views of Smith (b. 1914), editor and publisher of the Lexington Advertiser.


Newton, Don A. "Industry and the Delta." Delta Review 1, no. 2 (Spring 1964): 29-31, 62.

Efforts of the Delta Council to address the dearth of manufacturing jobs in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, 1957-64.


Nichols, Irby C. "Reconstruction in De Soto County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 295-316.

Undergraduate thesis, University of Mississippi, 1906-1907, covers early history of the county, politics, the Ku Klux Klan, and the economy; appendices list officeholders, taxes assessed, population, and voting statistics.


Nichols, Roy Franklin. "United States v. Jefferson Davis, 1865-1869." American Historical Review 31, no. 2 (Jan. 1926): 266-84.

Legal procedures undertaken to prosecute Davis for treason, culminating in the decision not to prosecute any standing Confederate treason indictments.


Nieman, Donald G. "The Freedmen's Bureau and the Mississippi Black Code." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 2 (May 1978): 91-118.

Argues that the Freedmen's Bureau's attempts to negate state laws controlling ex-slaves illustrates the essential Reconstruction problem of conflict of congressional and presidential powers.


Nieman, Donald G. To Set the Law in Motion: The Freedmen's Bureau and the Legal Rights of Blacks, 1865-1868. Millwood, N.Y.: KTO, 1979. xvii, 250 pp.

Includes many references to Mississippi's Black Code; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Rice University, 1975.


Noble, Stuart Grayson. Forty Years of the Public Schools in Mississippi, with Special Reference to the Education of the Negro. N.Y.: Teachers College, Columbia University, 1918. Contributions to Education no. 94. iv, 142 pp.

Examines public education for white and African American students, 1870-1910.


Noel, E.F. "Life and Services of David Ward Sanders." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 331-43.

Sketch of legislator and Confederate officer Sanders (1836-1909) of Holmes County by his nephew, Mississippi governor Edmund F. Noel.


Nolan, Charles E. St. Mary's of Natchez: The History of a Southern Catholic Congregation, 1716-1988. Natchez, Miss.: St. Mary's Parish, 1992. 2 vols.

History of the state's oldest Roman Catholic congregation.


Noland, Thomas Vaughn. Old Warren County Courthouse. Vicksburg, Miss.: n.p., 1949. 20 pp.

Undocumented vignettes about the Vicksburg courthouse.


Noley, Grayson, B. "The History of Education in the Choctaw Nation from Precolonial Times to 1830." Ph.D. dissertation, Pennsylvania State University, 1979. 252 l.

Education of the Mississippi Choctaws, 1500s and 1810-30.


Noll, Arthur Howard. "Bishop Otey as Provisional Bishop of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 130-45.

James Hervey Otey (1800-63), bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi, 1841-48.


Nordhaus, R. Edward. "SNCC and the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi, 1963-64: A Time of Change." History Teacher 17, no. 1 (Nov. 1983): 95-102.

Overview of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee voter registration activities and of the genesis of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.


Norse, Clifford C. "School Life of Amanda Worthington of Washington County, 1857-1862." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 2 (May 1972): 107-16.

Picture of plantation school life based on the diary of a young member of a prominent Delta family.


Northart, Debra Lynne. "The League of Women Voters in Mississippi: The Civil Rights Years, 1954-1964." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1997. 140 l.

Examines policy positions and the effect of the civil rights movement on the league.


Northrup, L.B. "A Hill of Death." Civil War Times Illustrated 30, no. 2 (May/June 1991): 24-33, 62-67.

Battle of Champion Hill (Hinds Co.) of May 1863, which was decisive in the subsequent fall of Vicksburg (Warren Co.).


Norton, Norma L. "A History of Jefferson County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1960. ix, 103 l.

History of the county since its founding as Pickering County in 1799; covers geography, settlement, population, economy, education, and politics.


Nossiter, Adam. Of Long Memory: Mississippi and the Murder of Medgar Evers. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1994. 303 pp.

Explores the significance of civil rights leader Evers's 1963 murder and the 1994 conviction of his killer, Byron De La Beckwith; includes biographical information on Evers (1925-63), Beckwith (1920-2001), governor William Waller (b. 1925), Charles Evers (b. 1923), and prosecutor Bobby DeLaughter (b. 1954).


"Noxubee Countian Was Notorious Train Robber." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 20 (Dec. 1981): 3-4.

Eugene F. Bunch (d. 1892) robbed trains in Louisiana during 1888 and 1892.


"The Noxubee County Agricultural High School." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 5 (Mar. 1978): 3-6.

History of one of the first rural high schools in the state, 1911-1940s.


"Noxubee County in the Political Campaign of 1860." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 3 (Sept. 1977): 7-8.

Meetings in support of Stephen Douglas and John Breckenridge.


"The Noxubee County Library System." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 10 (June 1979): 6-7.

History of the library, 1934-79.


"Noxubee County Primitive Baptist Association." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 26 (June 1983): 7-8.

Churches organized, 1841-71.


"Noxubee County-One Hundred Years Ago." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 9 (Mar. 1979): 1-8.

Briefly covers politics, education, religion, medicine, transportation, and houses.


"Noxubee County's Earliest Government." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 5 (Mar. 1978): 1-2.

Briefly describes the establishment of county government, 1833-34.


"Noxubee Native Became Prominent Educator." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 16 (Mar. 1980): 6-7.

Sketch of John Clayton Fant (1870-1929), president of Mississippi State College for Women in Columbus (Lowndes Co.), 1920-29.


Numbers, Ronald L., and Janet S. Numbers. "Science in the Old South: A Reappraisal." Journal of Southern History 48, no. 2 (May 1982): 163-84.

Argues that the agricultural orientation of the antebellum South, rather than the rise of proslavery sentiment, accounted for the region's failure to cultivate the study of science; includes discussion of Frederick A.P. Barnard and Eugene W. Hilgard of the University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.), Joseph Matthews and R. Morris of Jackson (Hinds Co.), Andrew Brown of Natchez (Adams Co.), and Richard Bolton of Pontotoc (Pontotoc Co.).


Nuwer, Deanne Love Stephens. "The 1878 Yellow Fever Epidemic in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1996. 172 l.

Discovers in the midst of the state's worst yellow fever epidemic a remarkable level of civic cooperation across racial, class, and political lines.


Oakley, Bruce C., Jr. A Postal History of Mississippi: Stampless Period, 1799-1860. Balwyn, Miss.: Magnolia, 1969-80. 2 vols.

Lists postmasters and post office establishment dates and illustrates postmarks.


Oaks, Elizabeth K. "Benjamin H. Grierson: Reluctant Horse Soldier and Gentle Raider." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1981. 134 l.

Civil War raid from La Grange, Tennessee, through Mississippi, to Baton Rouge, Louisiana: "the first successful long range Union cavalry raid behind enemy lines."


Oates, Stephen B. William Faulkner, the Man and the Artist: A Biography. N.Y.: Harper and Row, 1987. xiv, 363 pp.

Biography of the writer based on published sources.


O'Brien, James Stewart. "Storkline and the Carpenters: A Study of Unionization in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1983. x, 91 l.

Successful effort, 1961-63, by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America to unionize Storkline Corporation, a Jackson (Hinds Co.) furniture plant.


O'Brien, Matthew C. "William Faulkner and the Civil War in Oxford, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 2 (May 1973): 167-74.

Compares the war in the real Oxford and Lafayette County to Faulkner's fictional setting of Jefferson and Yoknapatawpha County.


O'Connor, Sandra Day. "Supreme Court Justices from Georgia." Georgia Journal of Southern Legal History 1, no. 2 (Fall/Winter 1991): [395]-405.

Includes material on L.Q.C. Lamar (1825-93), a native of Georgia who lived in Oxford (Lafayette Co.) at the time of his elevation to the Court.


Odom, Mackie. "The Introduction and Expansion of Railroad Lines in Mississippi, 1830-1973." Mississippi Geographer 2, no. 1 (Spring 1974): 51-59.

Observes that the development of rail lines in the state was determined by location of natural resources, proximity to trade routes outside the state, competition between railroad companies, and the need for private and spur lines by emerging industries.


Olcott, Deana J. Historical Jottings of Port Gibson, Mississippi. N.p., 1954. 98 pp.

Historical vignettes of the Claiborne County town.


Olden, Samuel B., Jr. "Hotels, Inns and Taverns in Mississippi, 1830-1860." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 4 (Oct. 1943): 171-84.

Illustrates the varying quality of travel accommodations in the period.


Oldham, Dorothy Zollicoffer. "Life of Jacob Thompson." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1930. 132 l.

Biography of Thompson (1810-84) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.), congressman and secretary of the interior in the James Buchanan cabinet.


Oliver, Mamie O. "The Lord's Work in the Mississippi Minefield: Baptist Home Missions and Jackson College." American Baptist Quarterly 11, no. 4 (Dec. 1992): 327-43.

Problems encountered by the institution, which was founded by the American Baptist Home Mission Society in 1877 as Natchez Seminary (Adams Co.), changed its name to Jackson College, then moved to Jackson (Hinds Co.), and finally became Jackson State University.


Oliver, Nola Nance. The Gulf Coast of Mississippi. N.Y.: Hastings House, 1941. 105 pp.

Brief histories and photographs of areas of interest to tourists in Jackson, Hancock, and Harrison counties.


Oliver, Nola Nance. Natchez, Symbol of the South. N.Y.: Hastings House, 1940. 101 pp.

Guidebook of antebellum houses in Natchez (Adams Co.).


Oliver, Nola Nance. This Too Is Natchez. N.Y.: Hastings House, 1953. 72 pp.

Lesser known antebellum structures in Natchez (Adams Co.).


Oliver, Paul. The Story of the Blues. Philadelphia: Chilton, 1969. 176 pp.

Examines the social and historical forces that shaped blues music from its origins in the postbellum South, especially the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta.


Olsen, Otto H. "Reconsidering the Scalawags." Civil War History 12, no. 4 (Dec. 1966): 304-20.

Revises David Donald's estimate of the extent to which Mississippi Whigs became Republicans during Reconstruction; see Donald's article in the Journal of Southern History, 1944.


Olsen, Otto H., ed. Reconstruction and Redemption in the South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980. v, 250 pp.

Chapter three, "Mississippi: Republican Factionalism and Mismanagement," by William C. Harris reviews the problems that ultimately led to the removal of Governor Adelbert Ames.


One Hundred Year History of Iuka, Mississippi, 1857-1957. Iuka, Miss.: The Vidette, 1957. 24 pp.

Program of the centennial celebration includes narrative history based on Lyla McDonald's undated history of the Tishomingo County town.


One Hundredth Anniversary of the Senatobia Presbyterian Church, Senatobia, Mississippi. N.p., 1948. [16] pp.

Centennial program includes brief history of the Tate County congregation.


O'Neal, Stella Anne. "The Legislative Leadership of Governors Bilbo and Conner: An Analysis and Comparison." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1944. iii, 154 l.

Compares legislative influence of Theodore G. Bilbo and Martin Sennett Conner, 1928-36.


Onkst, David H. "'First a Negro…Incidentally a Veteran': Black World War II Veterans and the G.I. Bill of Rights in the Deep South, 1944-1948." Journal of Social History 31 (1998): 517-44.

Documents the failure of the system to help African American veterans obtain education and jobs; based on the author's master's thesis, "Black World War II Veterans and the G.I. Bill of Rights in Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi, 1944-1947," University of South Florida, 1990.


O'Reilly, Kenneth. "The FBI and the Civil Rights Movement during the Kennedy Years-From the Freedom Rides to Albany." Journal of Southern History 54, no. 2 (May 1988): 201-32.

Use of the FBI to spy on civil rights activists; includes discussion of James Meredith's integration of the University of Mississippi (Oxford, Lafayette Co.) in 1962 and the assassination of Medgar Evers in Jackson (Hinds Co.) in 1963.


"Organization of Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 29 (Mar. 1984): 1-3.

Organized in 1833 from Choctaw lands ceded by the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek.


Orr, Ellen. "The Bottle Tree." Mississippi Folklore Register 3, no. 4 (Winter 1969): 109-11.

Traces origin of the tradition (a folk remedy for fevers) of hanging empty blue quinine bottles on peach trees to the late nineteenth century, when malaria was prevalent in the Delta.


Orr, J.A. "Life of Hon. James T. Harrison." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 187-200.

Sketch of Harrison (1811-79), lawyer of Columbus (Lowndes Co.).


Osborn, George C. "The Friendship of John Sharp Williams and Woodrow Wilson." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1939): 3-13.

Friendship between the senator and the president lasted from Wilson's inauguration in 1913 until his death in 1924.


Osborn, George C. "The Home Life of a Plantation Statesman, John Sharp Williams." Agricultural History 15, no. 3 (July 1941): 129-36.

Brief history of the Sharp and Williams families at Cedar Grove Plantation (Yazoo Co.) focuses on U.S. senator John Sharp Williams (1854-1932).


Osborn, George Coleman. James Kimble Vardaman: Southern Commoner. Jackson, Miss.: Hederman Brothers, 1981. 366 pp.

Biography of the governor and U.S. senator from Carrollton (Carroll Co.) and Greenwood (Leflore Co.).


Osborn, George C. "John Sharp Williams Becomes a United States Senator." Journal of Southern History 6, no. 2 (May 1940): 222-36.

Uses Williams's 1907 race against James K. Vardaman to illustrate changes in the political and social structure of the state since the Civil War.


Osborn, George Coleman. John Sharp Williams: Planter-Statesman of the Deep South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1943. Southern Biography series. ix, 501 pp.

Biography of U.S. senator Williams (1854-1932) of Yazoo County; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Indiana University, 1938, and his master's thesis, "Career of John Sharp Williams in the House of Representatives," Indiana University, 1932.


Osborn, George Coleman. "John Sharp Williams among the Wilson Reformers." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 1 (Jan. 1943): 3-13.

Reform bills in the first year of the Wilson administration, 1913-14, particularly Williams's reaction to the Underwood-Simmons tariff bill and the Owen-Glass currency bill.


Osborn, George C. "John Sharp Williams and the University of Virginia." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 1 (Jan. 1945): 11-22.

U.S. senator Williams attended the university from 1870 to 1873 and from 1876 to 1877.


Osborn, George C. "John Sharp Williams' Role in the Campaign of 1912." Journal of Mississippi History." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 4 (Oct. 1945): 187-220.

Argues that U.S. senator Williams helped secure the nomination and election of Woodrow Wilson for president.


Osborn, George C. "Joseph C. Cannon and John Sharp Williams." Indiana Magazine of History 35, no. 3 (Sept. 1939): 283-94.

Friendship between the Republican speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Democratic minority leader from 1903 to 1909.


Osborn, George C. "The Life of a Southern Plantation Owner during Reconstruction as Revealed in the Clay Sharkey Papers." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 2 (Apr. 1944): 103-12.

Sharkey owned plantations in Hinds and Leake counties.


Osborn, George C. "Mississippi's Closest Senatorial Contest: John Sharp Williams and James K. Vardaman, 1907." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 4 (Oct. 1950): 192-224.

Relates the acrimonious, race-baiting primary race in which governor Vardaman lost to eight-term congressman Williams.


Osborn, George C. "Pass Christian, the Winter White House: Christmas, 1913." Journal of Mississippi History 22, no. 1 (Jan. 1960): 1-26.

Woodrow Wilson spent three weeks recuperating from influenza at the Herndon mansion on the Gulf Coast (Harrison Co.).


Osborn, George C. "Plantation Life in Central Mississippi as Revealed in the Clay Sharkey Papers." Journal of Mississippi History 3, no. 4 (Oct. 1941): 277-88.

Based on the recollections of Sharkey (b. 1844), who spent his childhood on his family's Hinds and Leake County plantations.


Osborn, George Coleman. "Religious Cross Currents of the Wilson Administration." Journal of Mississippi History 2, no. 3 (July 1940): 136-46.

Anti-Catholic sentiment voiced by Tom Watson of Georgia, among others, 1913-1921; includes discussion of the correspondence between U.S. senator John Sharp Williams and Wilson about Wilson's press secretary Joseph Tumulty.


Oshinsky, David M. "Worse Than Slavery": Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice. N.Y.: Free Press, 1996. xiv, 306 pp.

History, 1904-70s, of the state penitentiary in Sunflower County, the "quintessential penal farm, the closest thing to slavery that survived the Civil War"; includes general history of the state penal system from the building of the first prison in Jackson (Hinds Co.) in 1836.


Osterweis, Rollin G. Romanticism and Nationalism in the Old South. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1949. x, 275 pp.

Chapter thirteen, "The Southwestern Frontier," examines religion, folklore, architecture, place-naming, the cult of chivalry, and the affinity for romantic literature in parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Texas, 1815-61.


Otken, Charles H. "Richard Curtis in the Country of the Natchez." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 147-53.

Religious intolerance encountered in an around Spanish Natchez from 1781 to 1798 by Curtis (d. 1811), the first Baptist clergyman in Mississippi.


Ott, Karyn Larlee. "Art Deco Architecture in North Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1994. 123 l.

Selected buildings of the 1920s and 1930s in Lafayette, Union, Coahoma, Lee, Prentiss, and Tate counties.


Oubre, Claude F. Forty Acres and a Mule: The Freedmen's Bureau and Black Land Ownership. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1978. xv, 212 pp.

Chapter five, "Homesteading in Mississippi, Alabama, and Arkansas," discusses feeble homesteading efforts by the bureau.


"Our Hotel-Yours and Mine." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 43 (Sept. 1987): 3; 44 (Dec. 1987): 7; 46 (June 1988): 4.

History of the Hotel Macon in Macon, 1891-1929.


"Outstanding Blacks." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 42 (June 1987): 2-3.

Brief sketches of African American educators of the early twentieth century, including Maggie Murray Washington, America W. Robinson Lucas, Minnie Lane Hunter, L.V. Hunter, Very Hunter Macon, L.L. Ivy, Albert Lovett, and Hawkins Cavette.


Owen, Thomas McAdory, comp. Bibliography of Mississippi. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1900. 194 pp.

Sporadically annotated list of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century books and newspaper and journal articles.


Owen, Thomas McAdory. "Federal Courts, Judges, Attorneys, and Marshals in Mississippi, 1798-1898." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 147-55.

Lists those who held the positions.


Owens, Harry P. "Steamboat Landings on the Yazoo and Tallahatchie Rivers (1875-1882)." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 4 (Nov. 1985): 266-83.

Detailed listing of landings, their exact locations, and the names of owner/operators.


Owens, Harry P. Steamboats and the Cotton Economy: River Trade in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1990. xiii, 255 pp.

Chronicles a century of Yazoo River steamboating, 1820s-1920s, concentrating on the career of Shum Parisot, whose company, P. Line, presided over the "golden age" of steamboating, 1870-90.


Owens, Nora Estelle. "An Analysis of the Rationale of Representative Southern Baptist Intellectuals, 1835-1900." M.A. thesis, Baylor University, 1973. 141 l.

Three clergymen educated in the North, including William Carey Crane (b. 1816), president of Mississippi Female College in Hernando (DeSoto Co.) and president of the Mississippi State Baptist Convention in the 1850s.


Owsley, Frank L. "The Pattern of Migration and Settlement on the Southern Frontier." Journal of Southern History 11, no. 2 (May 1945): 147-76.

Reasons for migration and occupations of those who settled the southern frontier, including Mississippi, from 1777 to 1865.


Paape, Charles William. "The Choctaw Revolt, a Chapter in the Intercolonial Rivalry in the Old Southwest." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois, 1946. 186 l.

Uneasy partnership of the Choctaws and the French against the British and the Chickasaws in the first half of the eighteenth century.


Pabis, George S. "Delaying the Deluge: The Engineering Debate over Flood Control on the Lower Mississippi River, 1846-1861." Journal of Southern History 64, no. 3 (Aug. 1998): 421-54.

Examines the origins of the levees-only engineering debate that culminated in the James B. Eads-Andrew A. Humphreys battle of the 1870s that was recounted by John M. Barry in Rising Tide (1997).


Pace, John Mac. "The Arts in Jackson, Mississippi: A History of Theatre, Painting, Sculpture, and Music in the Mississippi Capital since 1900." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1976. 352 l.

Growth of the arts in the twentieth century, including the role of women's clubs and the increasing influence of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Mississippi Arts Commission beginning in the 1960s.


Pace, Etta Eckles. "Hodding Carter: A Bio-Bibliography." M.A. thesis, Florida State University, 1958. ii, 50 l.

Bibliography introduced by a biographical chapter on Carter (1907-72), editor of the Greenville (Washington Co.) Delta Democrat-Times.


Palmer, James Melvin, Sr. "Mississippi School Districts: Factors Related to the Establishment of Dual Systems." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1971. 211 l.

Examination of desegregation includes a historical overview of the establishment of separate white and African American public schools.


Palo, Rani-Villem. "Forrest's Okolona Victory: An Invasion Ends on Mississippi's Black Prairie." Civil War Times Illustrated 24, no. 2 (Apr. 1985): 32-39.

Describes Union general William T. Sherman's plan of attack on North Mississippi and Confederate resistance under Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest, especially his 1864 triumph at Okolona (Chickasaw Co.) and its relationship to his later victory at Brice's Cross Roads (Lee/Prentiss counties).


Pan-Gens Historical and Genealogical Society of Panola County. The Panola Story. (1972-80).

Quarterly periodical mostly reprinted primary source material (tax rolls, cemetery lists, etc.) but also included occasional brief notes on the history of the county.


Panhorst, Michael Wilson. "Lest We Forget: Monuments and Memorial Sculpture in National Military Parks on Civil War Battlefields, 1861-1917." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Delaware, 1988.

Monuments erected primarily before 1917, including many examples from the Vicksburg National Military Park (Warren Co.); examines the military park movement, funding sources for monuments, the role of architects and sculptors, and the evolution of the design and meaning of the monuments.


Panola County Genealogical and Historical Society. History of Panola County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1987. 558 pp.

Includes information on Native Americans, communities, the Civil War, politics, churches, schools, agriculture, commerce, race relations, transportation, and societies; bulk of the volume comprised of family histories.


Paris, Mike, and Chris Comber. Jimmie the Kid: The Life of Jimmie Rodgers. London: Eddison, 1977. 211 pp.

Biography of James Charles Rodgers (1897-1933), "The Singing Brakeman," one of the earliest country music stars and a native of Lauderdale County.


Parker, Frank R. Black Votes Count: Political Empowerment in Mississippi after 1965. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990. xvi, 254 pp.

Efforts to overcome white resistance to African American political equality after passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; discusses litigation and its effect on African American representation in state and local government as well as its effect on national voting rights policy; winner of the McLemore Prize.


Parker, John Howard. "The Life and Works of James Howell Street." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Tennessee, 1978. xii, 249 l.

Includes one long chapter on the life of Street (1903-54), a writer from Laurel (Jones Co.).


Parkerson, James Woodrow. "Senator Henry Stuart Foote of Mississippi: A Rhetorical Analysis of His Speeches in Behalf of the Union, 1849-1852." Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, 1971. 422 l.

Analysis of Foote's speeches during the Compromise of 1850 controversy.


Parmer, Louis. Southeast Kemper: Its People and Communities. Livingston, Ala.: Sumter Graphics, 1982. 261 pp.

Covers early settlement, communities, Choctaws, homes, transportation, businesses, churches, schools, and post offices in southeastern Kemper County.


Parr, Marion Jessel. "Henry Stuart Foote, the Little Pacificator: An Account of His Mississippi Political Career." M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1947. vi, 345 l.

Life of the U.S. senator and Mississippi governor (1800-80); emphasizes his efforts in support of the Compromise of 1850.


Parrish, William E. "The Mississippi Saints." Historian 50, no. 4 (Aug. 1988): 489-506.

Group of approximately sixty Mormons from Northeast Mississippi and Northwest Alabama-including the William Crosby family-- emigrated to Utah in 1847-48 under the leadership of John Brown.


Parsons, Coleman O. "Steamboating as Seen by Passengers and River Men, 1875-1884." Mississippi Quarterly 24, no. 1 (Winter 1970-71): 19-34.

Steamboat travel along the Mississippi and Ohio rivers; mentions cattle delivery to Oxford (Lafayette Co.) and the Memphis-to-New Orleans route of the Thompson Dean.


Pascagoula Woman's Club. Thought You Should Know. N.p., 1975. 265 pp.

Includes brief vignettes of the history of Pascagoula (Jackson Co.).


Passons, John Duke. "British West Florida During the American Revolution." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1970. iv, 73 l.

Effect of the conflict on South Mississippi, which was part of the colony of British West Florida, 1763-98.


Passons, Katherine Dupont. "Mississippi's Reaction to the Supreme Court Decision of 1954." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1971. 67 l.

Blames poor political leadership in the months following the Brown v. Board of Education ruling for encouraging an atmosphere of defiance in Mississippi that led to the formation of the Citizens' Councils.


Pate, James Paul. "The Indian Military System of the Old Southwest, 1776-1794." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 102 l.

Includes discussion of Chickasaw military awareness and preparedness in the colonial period.


Patrick, Rembert W. Jefferson Davis and His Cabinet. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1944. x, 401 pp.

Confederate cabinet and its relationship to the president.


Patterson, E.V. Brown. "French Camp: A History of the Academy." M.S. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1949. 64 l.

History of the Choctaw County elementary and secondary school since its founding in 1885 as Central Mississippi Institute by the Presbyterian Church.


Patterson, Marjean. Covered Foundations: A History of Mississippi Woman's Missionary Union. N.p., [1978?]. v, 160 pp.

Centennial history of the Baptist organization, 1878-1978.


Patterson, Steven Alan. "Mississippi's Four Constitutions: A Study of Political Response to Societal Change." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1974. ix, 126 l.

Examines political significance of the constitutions of 1817, 1832, 1869, and 1890.


Patton, W.H. "History of the Prohibition Movement in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 10 (1909): 181-201.

Organization of a state chapter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, 1882-84; legislation controlling sale of liquor, 1822-1908; and local option elections, 1886-89.


Paul, Joan, Richard V. McGhee, and Helen Fant. "The Arrival and Ascendance of Black Athletes in the Southeastern Conference, 1966-1980." Phylon 45, no. 4 (Dec. 1984): 284-97.

Includes mention of the integration of team sports at the University of Mississippi and at Mississippi State University.


Payne, Charles M. I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1995. xiv, 525 pp.

Narrative of the civil rights movement in Mississippi in the 1960s stresses the importance of activists of the previous generation and of ordinary African American citizens, particularly women; winner of the McLemore Prize.


Payne, Cleveland V. "Economics, Education, and Religious Forces in the Development of a Black Middle Class in Laurel, Mississippi, from 1882 to 1928." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1982. 102 l.

Largely based on interviews; examines the emergence of a "unique" African American middle class in the Jones County town.


Payne, Cleveland. Laurel: A History of the Black Community, 1882-1962. Laurel, Miss.: the author, 1990. 159 pp.

Emphasizes the economy, education, and religion; includes mention of soprano Leontyne Price, a native of Laurel (Jones Co.).


Payne, Cleveland. The Oak Park Story: A Cultural History, 1928-1970. N.p.: National Oak Park High School Alumni Association, 1988. 125 pp.

History of Oak Park Vocational High School in Laurel (Jones Co.); soprano Leontyne Price was a member of the class of 1944.


Peacock, Evan, and W. Frank Miller. "Protohistoric Settlement Patterns in Northeast Mississippi and the Cedar Glade Hypothesis." Mississippi Archaeology 25, no. 2 (Dec. 1990): 45-57.

Disputes the theory that Native Americans in the protohistoric period settled in river bottoms in order to exploit deer near cedar glades; see also Jay K. Johnson's response in the same issue.


Peacock, Kathleen Moore. "William Alexander Percy: A Study in Southern Conservatism." M.A. thesis, Birmingham-Southern College, 1958. vi, 79 l.

Combines family history, biography, and literary criticism of the writings of Percy (1885-1942).


Peacock, Lucille, comp. Historical Sketches of Aberdeen, Mississippi. Aberdeen, Miss.: the author, 1961. [65] pp.

Undocumented brief vignettes of government buildings, lawyers, doctors, churches, schools and libraries, communication, transportation, and organizations.


Pearce, Charles Alfred. "James Hand, Jr.: Pioneer of Mechanization and Scientific Farming in the Lower Delta." M.A. thesis, Delta State University, 1977. 61 l.

A founder of the Delta Council and owner of the world's largest farm implement dealership, Hand (b. 189?) encouraged crop diversification and the use of tractors and mechanized cotton pickers.


Peck, Lucy Bryant. "The Life and Times of James Z. George." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1964. 99 l.

Biographical study of George (1826-97), chief justice of the state supreme court, U.S. senator, Redeemer, and framer of the disfranchisement provision of the 1890 state constitution.


Peden, Ann. "Place Names in Humphreys County." Mississippi Folklore Register 5, no. 2 (Summer 1971): 39-49.

Traces origins of names of towns, plantations, and bodies of water.


Peirce, Neil R. The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States. N.Y.: W.W. Norton, 1972. 528 pp.

Includes a chapter on Mississippi that emphasizes the importance of race relations and the civil rights movement in the state's history.


Peltier, Corbett James, Jr. "Confederate Natchez, 1861-1863." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1948. iv, 109 l.

Effects of war and federal occupation on the Adams County city's economy, social life, and crime rate.


Pemberton, John C. Pemberton: Defender of Vicksburg. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1942. xiv, 350 pp.

Biography of John Clifford Pemberton (1814-81), the general who commanded the Confederate forces at Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1863; the author is Pemberton's grandson.


Penick, James Lal, Jr. The Great Western Land Pirate. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1981. viii, 197 pp.

Life of the outlaw John A. Murrell (1806-45); chapter five, "The Murrell Conspiracy," describes the slave insurrection panic of 1835 in Madison and Hinds counties for which Murrell was largely blamed.


Penman, John T. "Historic Choctaw Towns of the Southern Division." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 2 (May 1978): 133-41.

Locates previously unknown sites in Newton, Clarke, and Jasper counties using eighteenth-century French and English maps and data from the Mississippi Department of Archives and History survey of 1975.


Penman, John T. "The Zooarchaeology of the Fatherland Site, Natchez, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Florida State University, 1973. 73 l.

Archaeological survey finds fifty-nine animal species at the site of the Grand Village of the Natchez (Native Americans), including cattle and chickens introduced by the French.


Pennington, Estill Curtis. "Plantation Baroque: Ambitious Intent at Kirkwood and Melrose." Southern Quarterly 26, no. 1 (Fall 1987): 125-42.

Includes detailed description of the architectural and furnishing styles of the antebellum Natchez (Adams Co.) mansion Melrose, which was owned by planter John T. McMurran.


Peoples, Morgan Dewey. "Negro Migration from the Lower Mississippi Valley to Kansas, 1879-1880." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1950. viii, 92 l.

Origins of the "exoduster" migration and reasons for its failure; notes that most Mississippi migrants came from Claiborne, Warren, and Hinds counties.


Pereyra, Lillian. "James Lusk Alcorn and a Unified Levee System." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 1 (Feb. 1965): 18-41.

Alcorn, governor from 1870-71 and U.S. senator from 1871 to 1877, focused much of his energy from the 1840s until his death in 1894 on an unsuccessful attempt to develop a single federally-sponsored levee system to prevent flooding on the Mississippi River.


Pereyra, Lillian. James Lusk Alcorn: Persistent Whig. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1966. Southern Biography series. xv, 237 pp.

Observes that the controversial Reconstruction governor embodied Whig ideology long after the party had officially ceased to exist.


Perlstein, Daniel. "Teaching Freedom: SNCC and the Creation of the Mississippi Freedom Schools." History of Education Quarterly 30, no. 3 (Fall 1990): 297-324.

In connection with the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, the Student Nonviolent

Coordinating Committee set up alternative schools for African Americans.


Perry, J.B., Jr., and Mrs. John Rundle. History of Yalobusha Baptist Association from 1835 to 1920. Grenada, Miss.: Baptist, 1960. 39 pp.

Includes brief history of the founding of the organization.


Peterson, John H., Jr. "Assimilation, Separation, and Out-Migration in an American Indian Group." American Anthropologist 74, no. 5 (Oct. 1972): 1286-95.

Analysis of Mississippi Choctaw response to rural isolation includes brief history of the tribe; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians: Their Recent History and Current Social Relations," University of Georgia, 1970.


Peterson, Owen. "Ethelbert Barksdale in the Democratic National Convention of 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no. 4 (Oct. 1952): 257-78.

Jackson (Hinds Co.) newspaper editor Barksdale spoke at the convention in Charleston, South Carolina.


Peyser, Joseph L. "The Chickasaw Wars of 1736 and 1740: French Military Drawings and Plans Document the Struggle for the Lower Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 1 (Feb. 1982): 1-25.

Demonstrates that the struggle between the French and the English for control of the region was "in great measure fought between their surrogates, the Choctaws and Chickasaws."


Peyton, Mary Lou. "The Mississippi Whigs." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1931. [7], 79 l., [10].

Biographical sketches of twenty-three prominent Whig politicians: Adam L. Bingaman, Edward Turner, George Winchester, John Isaac Guinn, William L. Harris, Alexander Keith McClung, Cotesworth P. Smith, Ephraim S. Fisher, Amos R. Johnson, James Malcolm Smiley, Fulton Anderson, Benjamin G. Humphreys, James Lusk Alcorn, Horatio F. Simrall, Ephraim G. Peyton, George S. Yerger, William Yerger, George Poindexter, Henry Stuart Foote, William L. Sharkey, Seargent S. Prentiss, and Sam Dale.


Phares, Ross. Reverend Devil: A Biography of John A. Murrell. New Orleans: Pelican, 1941. 263 pp.

Popular biography of Murrell (1806-45), one of the most notorious outlaws of his day.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Chickasaw Mission." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 4 (Oct. 1951): 226-35.

Presbyterian missions to the Chickasaw in present-day Chickasaw and Marshall counties flourished from 1819 to 1830.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Chickasaw Agency." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no. 2 (Apr. 1952): 119-37.

Activities of U.S. agents to the Chickasaw Nation, 1797-1837, and the significance of the location of the agency in present-day Chickasaw County.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Chickasaw Council House." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no. 3 (July 1952): 170-76.

Significance of the location of the center of tribal government, c. 1816-32, near the old Natchez Trace in present-day Pontotoc County.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Chickasaw, the English, and the French, 1699-1744." Tennessee Historical Quarterly 16, no. 2 (June 1957): 117-33.

Role of the Chickasaw in the collision of French and English colonial interests in the region, notably Bienville's systematic elimination of the Chickasaw military threat.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Choctaw Mission: An Experiment in Civilization." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no. 1 (Jan. 1952): 35-62.

Describes the work and ultimate failure of the ambitious Choctaw Mission of the American Board, a non-denominational missionary agency, 1818-32.


Phelps, Dawson A. "Genesis of the Natchez Trace Parkway." West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 19 (1965): 58-68.

Follows the movement to restore and improve the old Native American trail which ran through Mississippi from Nashville to Natchez, starting with the initial interest of the Mississippi Daughters of the American Revolution in 1905 and culminating in the signing of the bill creating the Natchez Trace Parkway in 1936.


Phelps, Dawson A., and Edward Hunter Ross. "Names Please: Place-Names Along the Natchez Trace." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no. 4 (Oct. 1952): 217-56.

Categorizes geographical names.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Natchez Trace, Indian Trail to Parkway." Tennessee Historical Quarterly 21, no. 3 (Sept. 1962): 203-18.

History of the road from its beginnings as a Native American trail to its designation as a National Park; includes information on the absence of a firmly fixed route, post riders on the trace, and various names for the road.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Robinson Road." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 3 (July 1950): 153-61.

Early road (est. 1821) from Columbus (Lowndes Co.) to the Natchez Trace that connected South Mississippi and Northeast Mississippi settlements.


Phelps, Dawson A. "Stands and Travel Accommodations on the Natchez Trace." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 1 (Jan. 1949): 1-54.

Detailed listing of stops during the heyday of the trace, from 1800 to 1825.


Phelps, Dawson A. "Tockshish." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 3 (July 1951): 138-45.

History of a Chickasaw County stop along the Natchez Trace.


Phelps, Dawson A. "Travel on the Natchez Trace: A Study of Its Economic Aspects." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 3 (July 1953): 155-64.

Emphasizes the trace's role as a facilitator of commerce, c. 1785-1830, before the expansion of steamboat traffic.


Phelps, Dawson A. "The Vandreuil Expedition, 1752." William and Mary Quarterly 15, no. 4 (Oct. 1958): 483-93.

Debunks the myth of a retaliatory expedition against the Chickasaw at Cotton Gin Port (Monroe Co.).


Phelps, Ernest. "The Office of Communication: The Participant Advocate-Its Function as a Broadcast Citizen Group, March, 1964, to March, 1971." Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio State University, 1971. viii, 256 l.

Deals especially with the FCC's action against Jackson (Hinds Co.) television station WLBT for violating the Fairness Doctrine in respect to its African American viewers.


Philippsborn, Gertrude. The History of the Jewish Community of Vicksburg from 1820 to 1968. Vicksburg, Miss.: n.p., 1969. ii, 106 pp.

Covers immigration of Jews from Germany to Vicksburg (Warren Co.), formation and history of Anshe Chesed congregation, the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, and the tornado of 1953; includes biographical reminiscences of rabbis and members of the congregation.


Phillips, Adrienne Cole. "The Mississippi Press's Response to John Brown's Raid." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 2 (May 1986): 119-34.

Demonstrates how secessionists used propaganda about the 1859 Harper's Ferry, Virginia, raid to portray abolitionists as violent subversives; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Responses in Mississippi to John Brown's Raid," University of Mississippi, 1983.


Phillips, Dorothy Nell. "William Augustus Evans-Statesman of Public Health." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1956. 65 l.

Life of Evans (1865-1948) of Aberdeen (Monroe Co.), physician, public health pioneer, and local historian.


Phillips, James Dillard. "Mississippi's Attitude toward the Tariff, 1817-1861." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1952. 69 l.

Analyzes varying opinions of politicians and other leaders of the antebellum era toward federal taxes on imports, which were often seen as destructive to the cotton-exporting economy of the southern states.


Phillips, Ulrich B. "The Origin and Growth of the Southern Black Belts." American Historical Review 11, no. 4 (July 1906): 798-816.

Argues that the antebellum black belts-including the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, Southwest Mississippi, and East Central Mississippi-developed as slaveholders increased their holdings of both slaves and land, creating a dichotomous system of large plantations and small non-slaveholding farms.


Pickett, Albert James. History of Alabama, and Incidentally of Georgia and Mississippi, from the Earliest Period. Charleston, S.C.: Walker and James, 1851. 2 vols.

Includes discussion of the de Soto expedition; Native Americans; the French, English, and Spanish governments; the massacre at Natchez; the Yazoo land sales; and the Mississippi territorial government.


Pierce, Patricia Jobe. The Ultimate Elvis: Elvis Presley Day by Day. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 1994. 560 pp.

Extensive calendar of Presley's life and posthumous events relating to his continued popularity.



Pieschel, Bridget Smith, and Stephen Robert Pieschel. Loyal Daughters: One Hundred Years at Mississippi University for Women, 1884-1984. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984. viii, 208 pp.

Founding and development of the Columbus (Lowndes Co.) school, the nation's first state-supported college for women.


"Pilgrimage to Gholson." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 45 (Mar. 1988): 5-6.

Describes three antebellum structures near Gholson, including the Haynes and Yoe family houses and a tavern.


Pilkington, John. "History and Literature in Mississippi since 1900." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 4 (Oct. 1958): 234-43.

Examines the portrayal of Mississippi history in fiction.


Pilkington, John. Stark Young. Boston: Twayne, 1985. 164 pp.

Biography of writer Young (1881-1963) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.), author of the novel So Red the Rose.


Pillar, James J. The Catholic Church in Mississippi, 1837-1865. New Orleans: Hauser, 1964. xviii, 380 pp.

Role of church hierarchy in political events of the period, concentrating on the Civil War years.


Pillar, James J. "Catholic Opposition to the Grange in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 3 (Aug. 1969): 215-28.

Correspondence between William Henry Elder, Bishop of Natchez, and other members of the church hierarchy, 1874-75, over the permissibility of Catholic membership in the Patrons of Husbandry.


Pillar, James J. "The Catholic Church's Ministry to the Choctaws of Mississippi in the Nineteenth Century." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 4 (Nov. 1988): 287-315.

Based on the diaries of Father Bartholomew Bekkers, a Dutch missionary to the Choctaw at Tucker (Neshoba Co.) from 1883 to the end of the century.


Pillar, James J. "A Special Breed: Mississippi's Catholic Priests in the 1880s." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 4 (Nov. 1993): 263-79.

Describes the difficult situation encountered by the forty-two priests, most of whom were foreign-born, who served in the Diocese of Natchez during the decade.


"Pioneer Profiles." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 30 (June 1984): 7-8.

Brief sketches of the lives of William Colbert (1722-c. 1850), George Baldwin Augustus (1802-50), John Culbertson (1791-1866), and William C.H. Findley (1789-1858).


"Pioneer Profiles." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 31 (Sept. 1984): 8.

Brief sketch of the life of Fleming Tine Colbert (b. 1796), the first sheriff of the county.


"Pioneer Schools." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 29 (Mar. 1984): 7-8.

Earliest "field schools" and academies, 1830s-60s.


Piper, Craig Scott. "The Civil Rights Movement in Starkville, Mississippi: A Local Struggle for Equality." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1993. 111 l.

Local African American activists.


Pishel, Robert Gordon. Natchez, Museum City of the Old South. Tulsa, Okla.: Magnolia, 1959. 128 pp.

Descriptions and some illustrations of antebellum homes in Natchez (Adams Co.).


Pittman, Walter. "Chemical Regulation in Mississippi: The State Laboratory (1882-)." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 2 (May 1979): 133-53.

Mississippi State University's lab, established originally to protect the state's farmers from an exploitative fertilizer industry.


Pittman, Walter E., Jr. "The Mel Cheatham Affair: Interracial Murder in Mississippi in 1889." Journal of Mississippi History 43, no. 2 (May 1981): 127-33.

Trial and execution in Grenada (Grenada Co.) of Cheatham for the murder of African American farmer James Tillman.


Pogue, Ralph E. "Gattman, Rich in History: Almost Void of Records, but Still Alive." Journal of Monroe County History 3 (1977): 23-27.

History of the Monroe County town.


Poindexter, Mrs. W.G. Sheppardtown, Now Morgan City, Leflore County, Mississippi. N.p., n.d. 12 pp.

History of the Yazoo River landing near Caldwell Plantation.


Polk, Charles Sessions. "A History of Jefferson Davis County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1969. x, 95 l.

History of the county since its formation in 1906 from portions of Lawrence and Covington counties; covers geography, education, socio-economic conditions, government and politics, and cultural life.


Polk, Noel, ed. Mississippi's Piney Woods: A Human Perspective. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1986. 188 pp.

Thirteen essays deal with the history of Southeast Mississippi, including settlement, industries, culture, and ecology.


Polk, Noel. "A Name for the City, a Shape for the Name: An Anti-Southern History." Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 1 (Spring 1996): 63-86.

Essay on the history and naming of Picayune (Pearl River Co.) and on the nature of southern history.


Polk, Noel, ed. Natchez before 1830. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi 1989. xii, 165 pp.

Essays on the Natchez Indians, colonial Natchez, life and education in frontier Natchez, early Natchez architecture, and sources for research.


Pollard, Edward Alfred. Life of Jefferson Davis, with a Secret History of the Southern Confederacy, Gathered 'Behind the Scenes in Richmond.' Philadelphia: National, [1869]. Viii, 536 pp.

Undocumented early history includes relatively little biographical material on Davis.


Pope, George J. "Agricultural Extension in Mississippi Prior to 1914." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1963. 87 l.

Establishment of Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College (Mississippi State University) and its farmer institutes, 1878.


Porter, Anne Hughes. A Place Called Sallis in Attala County, Mississippi. Fulton, Miss.: Itawamba County Times, 1982. 420 pp.

Dominated by primary material, but also includes brief narrative histories of the area and of local churches and schools.


Porter, David L. "The Mississippi Press and the Election of 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 3 (Aug. 1972): 247-52.

Studies the positions of seven major Mississippi newspapers on the presidential election of 1860 and assesses their influence on voters.


Porter, David. "Senator Pat Harrison of Mississippi and the Reciprocal Trade Act of 1940." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 4 (Nov. 1974): 363-76.

Harrison's role, as chairman of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, in helping to retain the Roosevelt's administration's low tariff rates.


Porterfield, Nolan. Jimmie Rodgers: The Life and Times of America's Blue Yodeler. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1979. 460 pp.

Biography of the "Singing Brakeman" (1897-1933) of Meridian (Lauderdale Co.).


Posey, Josephine McCann. Against Great Odds: The History of Alcorn State University. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1994. 216 pp.

History of the historically-black institution in Claiborne and Jefferson counties from its founding in 1871; concentrates on the administration of Walter Washington, beginning in 1969.


Posey, Walter B. The Baptist Church in the Lower Mississippi Valley. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1957. viii, 166 pp.

Includes information on the organization, growth, and ideology of the denomination in Mississippi from 1776 to 1845.


Posey, Walter B. "The Early Baptist Church in the Lower Southwest." Journal of Southern History 10, no. 2 (May 1944): 161-73.

Growth of the denomination in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana.


Posey, Walter Brownlow. The Presbyterian Church in the Old Southwest, 1778-1838. Richmond, Va.: John Knox, 1952. 192 pp.

Much of chapter six, "The Presbyterian Church among the Indians," devoted to work among the Choctaws of Mississippi.


Powdermaker, Hortense. After Freedom: A Cultural Study in the Deep South. N.Y.: Viking, 1939. xx, 408 pp.

Anthropological study of race relations in Indianola (Sunflower Co.) examines the "color line," African American and white attitudes, African American family life on plantations and in towns, and African American and white churches and schools.


Powell, Lawrence N. "Correcting for Fraud: A Quantitative Reassessment of the Mississippi Ratification Election of 1868." Journal of Southern History 55, no. 4 (Nov. 1989): 633-58.

Uses quantitative methodology to estimate the extent of voting fraud in the ratification election of 1868, in which Mississippi-alone among southern states-failed to ratify its Reconstruction constitution.


Powell, W.F. Jackson's Early History and 28 Years of Municipal Progress. Jackson, Miss.: Tucker Printing, [1944?]. 100 pp.

First half of the volume traces the history of Jackson (Hinds Co.) from the early 1800s through Reconstruction; second half recounts the city's accomplishments, 1917-44.


Powledge, Fred. Free at Last? The Civil Rights Movement and the People Who Made It. Boston: Little, Brown, 1991. xxiii, 711 pp.

Historical narrative interspersed with primary source material includes discussion of the University of Mississippi integration crisis, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Freedom Summer and the voter registration campaign, the Freedom Riders, and the State Sovereignty Commission.


Poyser, Stephen P. "Days Gone By: A Folklife, History and Oral History Study of Bay Springs, Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana University, 1991. 222 l.

Historical reconstruction of the Tishomingo County community from its heyday in the nineteenth century to its demise in the 1970s.


Prenshaw, Peggy W., and Jesse O. McKee, eds. Sense of Place: Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1979. 229 pp.

Includes "The Historical Geography of Extinct Towns," by Howard G. Adkins, and "From Prosperity to Poverty: Economic Growth and Change to 1900," by William K. Scarborough; reprinted in Southern Quarterly (17, nos. 3-4 (1979)).


Prentiss County Historical Association. History of Prentiss County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1984. 457 pp.

Covers Native Americans, early white settlers, Civil War, churches, schools, organizations, and historic sites; bulk of volume comprised of family histories.


Prentiss, Dale Roger. "Economic Progress and Social Dissent in Michigan and Mississippi, 1837-1850." Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford University, 1990. 387 l.

Argues that economic expansion contributed to extreme sectional feeling in both North and South; uses Mississippi and Michigan as test cases.


"Presbyterians Were Here, Too." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 11 (Sept. 1979): 1-4.

Presbyterian churches in the county, 1842-1960.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "Alcorn County Post Office Names, 1837-1911." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 3, no. 1 (Dec. 1969): 1-7.

Names of post offices, origins of their names, dates of establishment, names of first postmasters, and mail routes.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "The Corinth War Eagle." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 4 (Oct. 1958): 244-50.

Alcorn County newspaper, one of several in the state published by Union soldiers during the Civil War.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "The Custom of Using Portrait Statues as Gravestones." Mississippi Folklore Register 3, no. 2 (Summer 1969): 58-64.

Examines a limited sample in North Mississippi.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "The Custom of Using Portrait Statues and Other Portrait Likenesses at Graves." Mississippi Folklore Register 3, no. 4 (Winter 1969): 112-20.

Example in Jackson (Hinds Co.) and Memphis, Tennessee.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "Dr. Hallie Garrett: Corinth Physician." Journal of the Mississippi State Medical Association 21, no. 8 (Aug. 1980): 171.

Biographical sketch of Garrett (1874-1964), the first woman physician in Corinth and Alcorn County.


Price, Beulah M. "Dr. James Marcus Taylor: Member First Mississippi State Board of Health." Journal of the Mississippi State Medical Association 10, no. 9 (Sept. 1969): 417-18.

Life of the Corinth (Alcorn Co.) physician (1827-95) and medical society organizer.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "Henry Clay Moore of Corinth, Cecil Rhodes, and the British South African Company." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 4 (Nov. 1969): 321-33.

Career of Moore (1852-1930), explorer, big game hunter, and international businessman.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "The Mississippi-Louisiana Career of Colonel Edmund Richardson." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 2 (May 1978): 183-90.

Life of Richardson (1818-86), Jackson (Hinds Co.) businessman, New Orleans cotton commissioner, and president of the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition (New Orleans), 1884-86.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "More on Gravestone Customs." Mississippi Folklore Register 4, no. 2 (Summer 1970): 41-51.

Examples in Oxford (Lafayette Co.) and Memphis, Tennessee.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "Pacolet Horses in the Old Natchez District." Chronicle of the Horse 35 (Dec. 15, 1972): 9.

Descendants of Pacolet, Andrew Jackson's horse during the War of 1812, owned and raced by Natchez (Adams Co.) planters.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "The Rev. John Baptist Mouton: Confederate Chaplain." Journal of Mississippi History 24, no. 2 (Apr. 1962): 102-106.

Biographical sketch of the French priest who served many Mississippi parishes and died in the yellow fever epidemic of 1878.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "The Silk Enterprises at Corinth in the 1880s." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 3 (Aug. 1965): 249-58.

Encouraged by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, entrepreneurs established two silk farms in Corinth (Alcorn Co.) that proved unprofitable within a decade.


Price, Beulah M., comp. Some Corinthians of Today and Yesterday. Corinth, Miss.: the author, 1950. 288 pp.

Biographical information on over one hundred citizens.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "Some Doctors at Corinth in 1862." Southern Medical Bulletin 59 (Apr. 1971): 60-63.

Mentions physicians, endemic diseases, and the occupation of the Alcorn County town by federal troops after the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, early in the year.


Price, Beulah M. D'Olive. "Some Handwoven Coverlets, Blankets and Needlework in Alcorn County." Mississippi Folklore Register 8, no. 1 (Spring 1974): 135-43.

Nineteenth-century coverlets, illustrated.


Prim, G. Clinton, Jr. "Revivals in the Armies of Mississippi during the Civil War." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 3 (Aug. 1982): 227-34.

Religious activities in encampments in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas, 1962-65.


Prince, Jack Edward. "History and Development of the Mississippi Balance Agriculture with Industry Program, 1936-1958." Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio State University, 1961. x, 353 l.

Heavily documented economic analysis of the effects of BAWI, the state industrial development program that authorized local governments, beginning in 1936, to float bonds for construction of new industrial facilities.


Prince, James E. "The Civil Rights Struggles of a Weekly Editor: Philadelphia Copes with Murder." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1991. x, 350 l.

Murder of civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Cheney in 1964, the reporting of the case by the Neshoba Democrat, the role of the paper's editor, Stanley Dearman, in the commemoration of the event in 1989, and the carrer of New York Times editor Turner Catledge, a Philadelphia (Neshoba Co.) native.


Prince, Vinton M., Jr. "Will Women Turn the Tide? Mississippi Women and the 1922 United States Senate Race." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 3 (Aug. 1980): 212-20.

Support James K. Vardaman received from Yazoo-Mississippi Delta women during his unsuccessful senatorial campaign.


Prince, Vinton M. "The Woman Voter and Mississippi Elections in the Early Twenties." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 2 (May 1987): 105-14.

Influence of the short-lived League of Women Voters weekly newspaper published by suffragist Minnie Brewer.


Prince, Vinton M., Jr. "Women, Politics, and the Press: The Mississippi Woman Voter." Southern Studies 19, no. 4 (Winter 1980): 365-72.

Controversial history, 1922-24, of the official organ of the state League of Women Voters and of the paper's founder and editor, suffragist and governor's daughter Minnie Brewer.


Pritchett, Merrill R., and William L. Shea. "The Enemy in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 4 (Nov. 1979): 351-71.

Over twenty thousand captured Axis troops held in Mississippi during World War II worked in military and other government facilities and in agriculture and industry.


Prout, W.E. A Historical Documentation of Plymouth, Mississippi. Columbia, Miss.: Mississippi State College for Women, 1973. 117 pp.

History of the Lowndes County landing on the Tombigbee River.


Pruitt, Olga Reed. It Happened Here: True Stories of Holly Springs. Holly Springs, Miss.: South Reporter Printing, 1950. 115 pp.

Thinly documented historical sketches of the Marshall County town.


Pryor, Elizabeth Brown. "An Anomalous Person: The Northern Tutor in Plantation Society, 1773-1860." Journal of Southern History 47, no. 3 (Aug. 1981): 363-92.

Educational and social backgrounds of northern tutors, including Anton DePuy Van Buren of Mississippi.


Puckett, E.F. "Reconstruction in Monroe County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 103-61.

Undergraduate thesis, University of Mississippi, 1909, covers politics, Ku Klux Klan, Loyal League, Freedmen's Bureau, schools, and economy; appendices give statistics on slavery, economy, and education, and the introduction gives a brief early history of the county.


Pugh, Timothy, and Charles H. McNutt. "Julius Augustus Davies, M.D., an Early Contributor to Mississippi Archaeology." Mississippi Archaeology 26, no. 2 (Dec. 1991): 1-6.

Biographical sketch of Davies (b. 1855), donor of the Davies Collection of Native American artifacts at the University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Purcell, Leslie Harper. Miracle in Mississippi: Laurence C. Jones of Piney Woods. N.Y.: Comet, 1956. x, 252 pp.

Portrait of Laurence Clifton Jones (b. 1884) and the Piney Woods Country Life School, the school for African American youth Jones established in Rankin County in 1909; both the man and the school received national attention after Jones was honored on the television show This Is Your Life in 1954.


Purifoy, Lewis M. "The Southern Methodist Church and the Pro-slavery Argument." Journal of Southern History 32, no. 3 (Aug. 1966): 325-41.

Includes discussion of the pro-slavery position of Augustus Baldwin Longstreet (1790-1870), Southern Methodist clergyman and president of the University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.).


Pyburn, Nita Katherine. "Public Schools in Mississippi before 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 21, no. 2 (Apr. 1959): 113-30.

Examines state legislation to create and fund public schools, 1817-60.


Quaife, Milo M. "The Northwestern Career of Jefferson Davis." Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society 16, nos. 1-2 (Apr.-July 1923): 1-19.

While in the army, Davis was stationed from 1828 to 1833 at forts Crawford and Winnebago, Michigan Territory.


Quan, Robert S., in collaboration with Julian B. Roebuck. Lotus Among the Magnolias: The Mississippi Chinese. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1982. xvii, 162 pp.

Study of Chinese-Americans in the Delta relies on personal interviews; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "A Temporal Ethnography of the Mississippi Chinese: The Maintenance/Dissolution of an Ethnic Enclave," Mississippi State University, 1978.


Quimby, G.I. "Natchez Social Structure as an Instrument of Assimilation." American Anthropologist 48, no. 1 (Jan.-Mar. 1946): 134-36.

Comments on C.W.M. Hart's 1943 article in the same journal; argues that Natchez Indian population increased because members of other tribes were absorbed by the Natchez.


Quimby, George I, Jr. "The Natchezan Culture Type." American Antiquity 7, no. 3 (Jan. 1942): 255-75.

Archaeological finds at the Fatherland Plantation site (Adams Co.), the Ring and Glass sites (Warren Co.), and several sites in Louisiana help to relate the Natchez Indians to prehistoric tribes.


Quinn, Yancey M., Jr. "Jackson's Military Road." Journal of Mississippi History 41, no. 4 (Nov. 1979): 335-50.

Traces the Nashville-to-New Orleans route of the road whose construction was recommended by General Andrew Jackson and recounts its use since it was completed in 1820.


Quinnelly, Charles Marion. "The Mississippi Justice of the Peace." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1957. 93 l.

History of the office, first created in the Mississippi Territory by governor Winthrop Sargent.


Rabinowitz, Howard N., ed. Southern Black Leaders of the Reconstruction Era. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1982. Blacks in the New World series. xxiv, 422 pp.

Includes essays on two Mississippians in Congress: "Blanche K. Bruce of Mississippi: Conservative Assimilationist," by William C. Harris, and "John Roy Lynch: Republican Stalwart from Mississippi," by John Hope Franklin.


Rable, George C. But There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of Reconstruction. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1984. xiii, 257 pp.

Chapter nine, "Counterrevolution Triumphant: Mississippi, 1873-1876," describes violence and voter intimidation in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Clinton (Hinds Co.), Rose Hill (Wilkinson Co.), and in Tunica and Yazoo counties; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "But There Was No Peace: Violence and Reconstruction Politics," Louisiana State University, 1978.


Rable, George C. "The South and the Politics of Antilynching Legislation, 1920-1940." Journal of Southern History 51, no. 2 (May 1985): 201-20.

Explores the region's opposition to federal antilynching legislation and mentions Mississippians in Congress: James K. Vardaman, Byron P. "Pat" Harrison, and John Rankin.


Rabun, James Z. "Alexander Stephens and Jefferson Davis." American Historical Review 58, no. 2 (Jan. 1953): 290-321.

Tempestuous personal relationship and differing political views of the president and vice president of the Confederate States of America.


Ragusin, Anthony V. "The Centennial of the Biloxi Lighthouse." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 3 (July 1949): 204-206.

Brief history of the Harrison County lighthouse, built in 1848.


Rainwater, P.L. "An Analysis of the Secession Controversy in Mississippi, 1854-61." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 24, no. 1 (June 1937): 35-42.

Argues that if the South had resisted the Democrats' call to secede after the election of Abraham Lincoln, the "wait and see" attitude of Whig slaveholders might have encouraged a peaceful agreement to maintain, but not extend, slavery.


Rainwater, P.L. "Economic Benefits of Secession: Opinions in Mississippi in the 1850s." Journal of Southern History 1, no. 4 (Aug. 1935): 459-74.

State newspapers of the late 1850s revealed a growing resentment of northern business domination.


Rainwater, Percy L. "Conquistadors, Missionaries, and Missions." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 2 (May 1965): 123-47.

Establishment of Catholic and Protestant missions and churches, 1540-1817.


Rainwater, Percy L. "Indian Missions and Missionaries." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 1 (Feb. 1966): 15-39.

Early nineteenth-century activities of the New York Missionary Society and the Presbyterian Synod of South Carolina and Georgia; includes background of the Civilization Act of 1819, which facilitated missions on the frontier.


Rainwater, Percy Lee. Mississippi: Storm Center of Secession. Baton Rouge, La.: Otto Claitor, 1938. xi, 248 pp.

Maintains that most voters sought to retain slavery but differed on the best course to safeguard it; that newspaper editors and small slaveholders, rather than large slaveholders, agitated for secession; and that northern taunts over several decades contributed to secessionist fervor.


Ramage, James A. "Jefferson Davis: Family Influences in the Making of a Great Statesman." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 4 (Nov. 1989): 341-56.

Undocumented vignettes of Davis's family, education, health, and personal tragedies.


Ramenofsky, Ann F. "The Introduction of European Disease and Aboriginal Population Collapse." Mississippi Archaeology 20, no. 1 (June 1985): 2-19.

Finds that European diseases had killed many Indians in the Lower Mississippi River Valley by the mid-1500s.


Ranck, James Byrne. Albert Gallatin Brown: Radical Southern Nationalist. New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1937. xiv, 320 pp.

Biography of Brown (1813-80), legislator, judge, governor of Mississippi, congressman, and Confederate senator.


Rand, Clayton. Men of Spine in Mississippi. Gulfport, Miss.: Dixie, 1940. 307 pp.

Sixty-four biographical sketches of political, military, and religious leaders from the sixteenth century to the 1920s.


Randall, Charles Edgar, and Henry Clepper. Famous and Historic Trees. Washington: American Forestry Association, 1976. 90 pp.

Includes brief entries on historic trees in Claiborne, Alcorn, Harrison, Benton, Adams, Clay, Rankin, Wilkinson, and Bolivar counties.


Randall, Ruth Painter. I, Varina: A Biography of the Girl Who Married Jefferson Davis and Became the First Lady of the South. Boston: Little, Brown, 1962. xii, 243 pp.

Undocumented popular biography of Varina Howell Davis (1826-1906).


Ratliff, Sarah Frances. "The Career of Thomas Lowry Bailey." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1952. 75 l.

Bailey (d. 1946) was a state legislator, speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives, and governor from 1944 to 1946.


Rawson, Donald M. "Democratic Resurgence in Mississippi, 1852-1853." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 1 (Feb. 1964): 1-27.

States' Rights Democrats lost control of the state to Union Democrats when Henry S. Foote became governor in 1852, but regained control by 1854.


Rawson, Donald M. "Party Politics in Mississippi, 1850-1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Vanderbilt University, 1964. v, 324 l.

Examines the increasing importance of the States' Rights-Unionist split in the last antebellum decade.


Ray, Carl Allen. "The Political Career of Thomas Pryor Gore." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1955. 98 l.

Gore (1870-1949) of Oklahoma was a native of Choctaw and Webster counties, Mississippi.


Ray, Elsie Aleene. "The Life and Times of Edward Fontaine, a Mississippi Leonardo." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1951. 171 l.

Fontaine (1814-84) was a lawyer, clergyman, soldier, artist, writer, amateur civil engineer, and promoter of public education.


Ray, Florence Rebecca. Chieftain Greenwood Leflore and the Choctaw Indians of the Mississippi Valley. Memphis, Tenn.: C.A. Davis Printing, 1936. 141 pp.

Undocumented account by a great-granddaughter of Leflore (1800-65), the chief who negotiated the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek (1830).


Ray, Frederic. "1st Batallion, 13th Infantry-'First at Vicksburg!'" Civil War Times 2 (Oct. 1960): 13.

"First at Vicksburg" became the official slogan of the Union regiment after the action of May 19, 1863, in which forty-three percent of its number were killed.


Rea, Robert R. "The Naval Career of John Eliot, Governor of West Florida." Florida Historical Quarterly 57, no. 4 (Apr. 1979): 451-67.

Eliot (1742-69) was governor of West Florida for one month in 1769.


Read, James Cook. "The Williams Chancellorship at the University of Mississippi, 1946-1968." Ed.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1978. 340 l.

Problems faced by John Davis Williams, the longest-serving chancellor of the university, especially sharply increased enrollment after World War II and the integration crisis of 1962.


Reber, Thomas. "Proud Old Natchez": History and Romance, Compiled from Ancient Chronicles and Modern Histories. Natchez, Miss.: Natchez Printing and Stationery, 1909. 71 pp.

Biographical sketches persons and historical events and sites.


Reconstruction in Northern Counties of Mississippi. University: University of Mississippi, n.d. unpaged.

Nine county Reconstruction studies (B.A. theses, c. 1907-12, directed by Professor Franklin L. Riley) including two not published elsewhere: "Leflore County," by John Arthur Bell, and "Lafayette County," by Charles Arthur Williamson.


Reconstruction in Southern Counties of Mississippi and Other Theses. University: University of Mississippi, n.d. unpaged.

Six county Reconstruction studies (B.A. and M.A. theses, c. 1902-1908, directed by Professor Franklin L. Riley) including five not published elsewhere: "Clarke County," by F.C. Jenkins; "Lauderdale County," by J.E. Reed, Jr.; "Leake County," by R.B. Walker; "Simpson County," by Frederick Monroe Ball; and "Newton County," by A.J. Brown; also bound in this volume are "General Aspects of Local Reconstruction," by A.B. Schauber, and "Alleged Secession of Jones County," by Goode Montgomery.


Reed, Bevington Arnold. "Benjamin Chase, 1789-1871, Pioneer Minister, Educator, Planter, and Agent for the American Bible Society." Ph.D. dissertation, Texas Technological College, 1953. 282 l.

Chase was a Presbyterian clergyman from Natchez (Adams Co.).


Reed, Forrest F. Itawamba: A History: Story of a County in Northeast Mississippi. Nashville, Tenn.: Reed, 1966. x, 186 pp.

Undocumented narrative contains some family history.


Reed, Richard F. The Natchez Country: From the Settlement by the French to the Admission of Mississippi as a State. N.p., n.d. 35 pp.

Brief undocumented account of the years of French, British, Spanish, and finally, United States control, 1700-1817.


Rees, Gary Lee. "The Birth of a Legend: John A. Murrell's Connection with the 1835 Mississippi Insurrection Hysteria. M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1982. v, 110 l.

Disputes Virgil A. Stewart's identification of the outlaw Murrell as the mastermind of a planned slave insurrection.


Reeves, Carolyn Keller, ed. The Choctaw Before Removal. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1985. xvi, 243 pp.

Collected essays examine various aspects of the tribe before the 1830s, particularly the impact of European contact on Choctaw culture.


Reeves, Lucille Morgan. "Life in the Governor's Mansion." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 22 (June 1982): 3-5.

The Allen-Morgan House in Macon, used by Governor Charles Clark in 1865 when the town served as the last Confederate capital of the state.


Reeves, Mrs. D.D. [Lucille Morgan], ed. "The Trials of Chief Cameron Wesley." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 26 (June 1983): 4-6.

Murder trial of a Choctaw chief in 1940, presided over by Circuit Court Judge John C. Stennis.


Register, James. Fort Rosalie: The French at Old Natchez (1682-1762). Shreveport, La.: Mid-South, 1969. 107 pp.

Relates impressions of French settlers and describes their relationship to the Natchez Indians.


Register, James. Jallon, Arabic Prince of Old Natchez (1788-1828). Shreveport, La.: Mid-South, 1968. 88 pp.

Undocumented biography of Abduhl Ibrahim Rahaman ("Prince"), West African slave of Thomas Foster of St. Catherine Creek (Adams Co.).


Register, James, comp. Views of Old Natchez. Shreveport, La.: Mid-South, 1969. [35] pp.

Sketches by Charles A. Leseuer (1778-1846) of early nineteenth-century Natchez (Adams Co.); each sketch accompanied by brief commentary.


Reid, Loren D. "'Private John' Allen: A Humorist in Politics." Journal of Mississippi History 5, no. 3 (July 1943): 115-24.

Congressional speeches, 1885-1900, of U.S. representative Allen; article originally appeared in the Quarterly Journal of Speech (1942).


Remini, Robert V. "Andrew Jackson's Adventures on the Natchez Trace." Southern Quarterly 29, no. 4 (Summer 1991): 35-42.

Jackson's business dealings on the route between Natchez (Adams Co.) and Nashville, Tennessee; his brief residence in Bayou Pierre (Claiborne Co.); his relationship with Choctaw agent Silas Dinsmore; and his travel on the trace during the War of 1812.


Remini, Robert V. "Henry Clay and the Natchez Connection." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 3 (Aug. 1992): 269-78.

Clay delivered two speeches in Natchez (Adams Co.) in 1830 and 1831.


Renick, Cecil Oren, Jr. "'The Great Adventure': A Comprehensive Study of the Mississippi Baptist Work with the Negro through the Committee of Concern and the Department of Work with Negroes." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1967. iv, 188 l.

Evaluates the denomination's work with African Americans; emphasizes the Committee of Concern's response to the burning of forty-two African American churches in 1964.


Reps, John W., with modern photographs from the air by Alex MacLean. Cities of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century Images of Urban Development. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1994. 342 pp.

Includes scattered mentions of Natchez (Adams Co.) and Vicksburg (Warren Co.) and reproductions of old photographs and engravings of both cities.


Reuss, Martin. "The Army Corps of Engineers and Flood-Control Politics on the Lower Mississippi." Louisiana History 23, no. 2 (Spring 1982): 131-48.

Differing approaches to flood control in the Atchafalaya Basin of Louisiana and the Yazoo Basin of Mississippi, 1928-1970s.


Reynolds, Charles F. "The Economic and Social Structure of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Virginia, 1948. 300 l.

Socio-economic changes in the Delta, 1890-1945.


Reynolds, L.A. "The Negro in Mississippi Courts Prior to 1865." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1972. ii, 129 l.

Examines decisions, 1850-60, of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, which applied separate legal systems to cases involving slaves and those involving free blacks; appendix lists and briefly annotates over two hundred cases in which African Americans were named.


Reynolds, Thomas Upton. "A History of Clarke Memorial College." M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1952. 111 l.

Institutional history of the Baptist junior college at Newton (Newton Co.), 1908-52.


Rhodes, Lelia Gaston. Jackson State University: The First Hundred Years, 1877-1977. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1979. xviii, 340 pp.

Institutional history of the historically-black university in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Rhodes, M.C. History of Taxation in Mississippi (1798-1929). Nashville, Tenn.: George Peabody College for Teachers, 1931. Contributions to Education, no. 79. 208 pp.

Tax provisions in the state constitutions, types of taxes, and the history of tax collection.


Rice, Arthur Hopkins. "Salient Changes in Mississippi Land Tenure, 1860-1900." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1948. v, 144 l.

Compares land ownership in Bolivar, Lafayette, Oktibbeha, Warren, Hinds, and Adams counties to that of the larger South and explains why Mississippi counted more large-scale plantations in 1900 than in 1860.


Rice, Kathleen George. "A History of Whitworth College for Women." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1985. 145 l.

History of the Methodist college in Brookhaven (Lincoln Co.), 1858-1937.


Rich, Charles A. "The History of the French Camp Presbyterian Church." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1967. 133 l.

Institutional history of the Choctaw County congregation since its organization in 1849.


Richards, E.Q. "Baptists in Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 2 (June 1977): 1-7.

Organization of twenty-eight Baptist churches in the county, 1834-1955.


Richards, E.Q. "Early Days and Some Early Families of Mashulaville." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 30 (June 1984): 1-4.

Very brief history of the community named for Choctaw chief Mushulatubbee.


Richardson, Ralph. "The Choice of Jefferson Davis as Confederate President." Journal of Mississippi History 17, no. 3 (July 1955): 161-76.

Reviews the political maneuvering that led to Davis's 1861 selection as president of the Confederate States of America.


Richardson, Thomas J. "Current Place Names of Jasper County, Mississippi." Mississippi Folklore Register 11, no. 2 (Fall 1977): 101-30.

Gazetteer.


Riddle, Ray. Edited by Jon Cerame. From Greasy Row to Catfish Capital. Oxford, Miss.: Rebel, 1978. 153 pp.

History of Belzoni (Humphreys Co.), including Native American and white settlers, origin of the town's name, organization of Humphreys County, and the genesis of the modern catfish farming industry.


Riddlesperger, James W., Jr., and Donald W. Jackson, eds. Presidential Leadership and Civil Rights Policy. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1995. xv, 191 pp.

Includes chapter seven, "Presidential Decision-Making in Two Desegregation Crises: Little Rock Central High School and the University of Mississippi," by Mark Stern.


Riess, Karlem. "Claudius Wistar Sears, Soldier and Educator." Journal of Mississippi History 11, no. 2 (Apr. 1949): 128-37.

Sears was a professor of mathematics at the University of Mississippi (Lafayette Co.), 1865-89.


Riggs, David F. "Charles Conway Floweree: Virginia Colonel and Vicksburg Entrepreneur." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 3 (Aug. 1984): 163-78.

Floweree (1842-1929) was a planter, bank executive, newspaper publisher, and one of the founders of the Vicksburg National Military Park Association.


Riggs, Marvin A. "Some Aspects of the Administration of Governor John Marshall Stone of Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1947. iv, 197 l.

Assesses the leadership of Stone (1830-1900), governor of Mississippi from 1876 to 1882 and from 1890 to 1896.


Riley, Franklin L., and James M. White. "An Account of Manuscripts, Papers, and Documents in Public Repositories within the State of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 5 (1902): 121-227.

Papers in government offices, schools, and churches and in professional, literary, and industrial organizations.


Riley, Franklin L. "Choctaw Land Claims." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 345-95.

Account of land fraud following the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek and of the legislative investigation of claims made by Choctaws who wished to stay in Mississippi.


Riley, Franklin L. "Demarcation of the Mississippi-Louisiana Boundary from the Mouth of Pearl River to the Gulf of Mexico." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 61-74.

Surveying and setting of buoys, 1908-10, to mark the water boundary which had been determined by the U.S. Supreme Court in Louisiana v. Mississippi (1906), a case in which both states had claimed rights to oyster beds in Mississippi Sound.


Riley, Franklin L. "Dr. John W. Monette: The Pioneer Historian of the Mississippi Valley." South Atlantic Quarterly 5, no. 4 (Oct. 1906): 367-75.

Interprets the significance of the work of natural historian Monette (1803-51), author of the first history of the Mississippi River Valley.


Riley, Franklin L. "Extinct Towns and Villages of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 5 (1902): 310-83.

Gazetteer of nearly one hundred extinct or nearly-extinct communities.


Riley, Franklin L. "Life and Literary Services of Dr. John W. Monette." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 199-237.

Life and works of Monette (1803-51), author of Physical Geography of the Mississippi Valley (1845-46); includes portrait.


Riley, Franklin L. "Life of Col. J.F.H. Claiborne." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 217-44.

Biographical sketch of John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne (1807-84), nineteenth-century historian of Mississippi.


Riley, Franklin L. "Location of the Boundaries of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 167-84.

Boundary disputes and resolutions, 1803-37.


Riley, Franklin L. School History of Mississippi. Richmond, Va.: B.F. Johnson, 1900. 413 pp, vii.

Early textbook.


Riley, Franklin L. "Sir William Dunbar-The Pioneer Scientist of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 85-111.

Biographical sketch of Dunbar (1749-1810) of Natchez (Adams Co.), planter, meteorologist, surveyor, and inventor.


Riley, Franklin L. "Spanish Policy in Mississippi after the Treaty of San Lorenzo." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1, no. 1 (June 1898): 50-66.

Spain's delay in implementing unpalatable stipulations in the 1795 Treaty of San Lorenzo.


Riley, Franklin L. "Transition from Spanish to American Control in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 3 (1900): 261-311.

Covers events in the period from the signing of the Treaty of San Lorenzo (1795) to the arrival of Winthrop Sargent as governor of the Mississippi Territory (1798).


Riley, Harris D., Jr. "Jefferson Davis and His Health." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 3 (Aug. 1987): 179-202; no. 4 (Nov. 1987): 261-87.

Pediatrician evaluates Davis's health in a two-part article.


Ringold, May Spencer. "James Lusk Alcorn." Journal of Mississippi History 25, no. 1 (Jan. 1963): 1-14.

Deals with Alcorn's Civil War years and his tenure as Reconstruction governor and U.S. senator.


Ringold, May Spencer. "Senator James Zachariah George of Mississippi: Bourbon or Liberal?" Journal of Mississippi History 16, no. 3 (July 1954): 164-82.

Evaluates George's record on economic issues, 1875-97.


Ringold, May Spencer. "Senator James Zachariah George and Federal Aid to Common Schools." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 1 (Jan. 1958): 30-36.

George based his congressional fight, 1884-90, for federal aid to public schools on the contention that Mississippi, with a low tax base, could not afford to educate its majority-black population without help from the federal government.


Ringold, May Spencer. "Some Liberal Aspects in the Senatorial Policies of James Zachariah George During the Period 1881-1890." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1950. v, 83 l.

Examines the positions of U.S. senator George (1826-97) on federal aid to education, railroad regulation, tariffs, labor, and farmer education and welfare.


"Roads and Other Means of Travel." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 29 (Mar. 1984): 4-5.

Nineteenth-century transportation on roads, trails, and rivers.


Robbins, William Hal. "The Mississippi Gubernatorial Campaign of 1951." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1955. 103 l.

Primary election campaign culminated with a runoff between former governor Hugh L. White and Paul Johnson, Jr.


Roberson, Patt Foster. "A History of the Hattiesburg American." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1985. 289 l.

Newspapers in Hattiesburg since 1885, with emphasis on the Hattiesburg American, which was founded in 1917.


Roberts, Bobby, and Carl Moneyhon. Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Mississippi in the Civil War. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993. xiii, 396 pp.

Features chapters on the siege of Vicksburg (Warren Co.), the Meridian Campaign (Lauderdale Co.), campaigns in North Mississippi, the war on the home front, and the aftermath of war; many photographs depict Mississippians who served, and the appendix includes brief biographical sketches of some of those pictured.


Roberts, Clarence Wood. "The Chickasaws and the Great Colonial Powers, 1540-1750." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1959. 81 l.

Chickasaw contact with Hernando de Soto, the English, and the French.


Roberts, Owen. "Richard Thomson: Was He the First English-Speaking Settler in the Natchez District?" Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 1 (Feb. 1977): 63-74.

Biography and family history of the first settler to receive a land grant, 1767.


Robertson, John A., and Tom W. Conyer, Jr. Early History of the Town of Ruleville, Mississippi; in the Heart of the Mississippi Delta. [Ruleville, Miss.]: n.p., 1965. 43 pp.

History of the Sunflower County town, 1898-1965, includes information on settlers, farming, business, transportation, schools, churches, and newspapers.


Robertson, John A. "A History of Adams County, Mississippi, 1799-1964." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1965. viii, 143 l.

History of the county from its organization, including early settlement, population, economy, and politics.


Robertson, John A. History of the Ruleville Baptist Church, Ruleville, Mississippi. N.p.: the author, 1972. viii, 25 pp.

Institutional history of the Sunflower County church, 1902-72, including recollections of pastors.


Robertson, John Allen. "Transportation in Mississippi Before 1860." M.A. thesis, Mississippi Southern College, 1961. v, 99 l.

Transportation by water (ark, barge, flatboat, keelboat, steamboat), land (horse, stagecoach), and railroad.


Robertson, Thomas Luther, Jr. "The Unfolding Magnolia: A Literary History of Mississippi until 1876." Ph.D. dissertation, Vanderbilt University, 1960. vi, 319 l.

Discusses the state's literary and political figures, many of them quite minor; includes scant biographical information on most of them and more extensive information on novelist Joseph Holt Ingraham.


Robinson, David Moore. "A Simonidean Epitaph at Mississippi." Classical Bulletin 27, no. 4 (Feb. 1951): 37-40.

Confirms that the Greek inscription on the Confederate monument at the head of the Circle on the University of Mississippi campus is a quote from Simonides.


Robinson, James E. "Hodding Carter: Southern Liberal, 1907-1972." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1974. 354 l.

Biography of the Pulitzer Prize-winning editor and publisher of the Greenville Delta Democrat-Times (Washington Co.).


Robinson, Mary Fisher. "A Sketch of James Lusk Alcorn." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 1 (Jan. 1950): 28-45.

Brief biography of Alcorn, Reconstruction governor of Mississippi and U.S. senator, one of a small number of Mississippi Whigs who became Republicans after the Civil War.


Robison, Daniel M. "From Tillman to Long: Some Striking Leaders of the Rural South." Journal of Southern History 3, no. 3 (Aug. 1937): 289-310.

Argues that late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century political leaders James K. Vardaman and Theodore G. Bilbo were not demagogues, but instead embodied the southern political idealogy of their day.


Robson, George L., Jr. "The Farmers' Union in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 27, no. 4 (Nov. 1965): 373-89.

History, 1904-19, of the Mississippi branch of the Farmers' Educational and Co-operative Union of America, which secured higher prices for cotton, organized a cooperative, and supported the establishment of Mississippi Normal College (now University of Southern Mississippi); based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, Mississippi State University, 1963.


Robson, George Locke, Jr. "The Mississippi Farm Bureau through Depression and War: The Formative Years, 1919-1945." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1974. 303 l.

Early history of the Farm Bureau includes background on Mississippi agriculture from the colonial period to the twentieth century.


Rochelle, Robert P. "James Daniel Lynch: A Mississippi Writer of the Reoconstuction Era." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1971. vi, 100 l.

Life and works of Lynch (1836-1903), a minor poet and essayist from West Point (Clay Co.).


Rodabaugh, John E. Steamboats on the Upper Tombigbee. Hamilton, Miss.: Tombigbee, 1985. viii, 87 pp.

Nineteenth-century steamboat life, river hazards, and ports; includes list of steamboats and their captains.


Rodabaugh, John E. "A History of the Negroes of Aberdeen and Monroe County, Mississippi, 1790-1916." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1964. 69 l.

African Americans as slaves on numerous cotton plantations, as Reconstruction officeholders, and as members of a significant post-Reconstruction middle class.


Rogers, Arthur Leon, Jr. "Mississippi Banking During Depression and Recovery." M.A. thesis, George Washington University, 1938. vii, 145 l.

Effects of the Great Depression on state banks and the efforts of the state and federal governments to establish a stable banking system, 1929-36; includes an introductory chapter on the history of banking in Mississippi, 1809-1929.


Rogers, Margaret Greene. Civil War Corinth, 1861-1865. Corinth, Miss.: the author, 1987. 46 pp.

Brief, undocumented account of the battles of Corinth (Alcorn Co.) and Tupelo (Lee Co.).


Rogers, Ralph Jackson. "The Legion and Mississippi: State Legislative Goals of the Mississippi Department, The American Legion, 1944-1960." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1963. 96 l.

Examines a large legislative lobbying group.


Rogers, Robert Clinton. "From Alienation to Integration: A Social History of Baptists in Antebellum Natchez, Mississippi." Th.D. dissertation, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, 1990. 123 l.

Uses contemporary newspapers to examine the factors that led to increasing acceptance of the denomination in Natchez (Adams Co.), 1817-61.


Rogers, Tommy W. "Joseph B. Cobb: Antebellum Humorist and Critic." Mississippi Quarterly 22, no. 2 (Spring 1969): 131-46.

Life and work of Cobb (1819-58), author of Mississippi Scenes (1851).


Rogers, Tommy W. "Joseph B. Cobb: Continuation of a Distinguished Lineage." Georgia Historical Quarterly 66, no. 3 (Fall 1972): 404-14.

Life and writings of Cobb (1819-58) of Columbus (Lowndes Co.), author of local color sketches published as Mississippi Scenes (1851).


Rogers, Tommy W. "Oakland College: An Early Presbyterian Educational Endeavor in the Old Southwest." Journal of Presbyterian History 43, no. 1 (Mar. 1965): 37-56.

History of the college, 1830-71, near Rodney, whose buildings form the original core of the Alcorn State University campus (Jefferson/Claiborne counties).


Rogers, Tommy Wayne. "Oakland College, 1830-1871." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 2 (May 1974): 143-60.

History of the Presbyterian school near Rodney (Jefferson Co.) since its inception to its closing and the purchase of the property by the state for a site for Alcorn A&M College in 1871.


Rogers, Tommy Wayne. "The Schools of Higher Learning at Sharon, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 1 (Feb. 1966): 40-55.

History, 1837-74, of two Madison County Methodist academies: Madison College and Sharon Female College.


Rogers, Tommy W. "Sharon and Madison Colleges in Mississippi." Methodist History 5, no. 1 (Oct. 1967): 49-63.

Brief lives of two antebellum Methodist academies in Sharon (Madison Co.), 1837-74.


Rogers, Tommy W. "T.C. Thornton: A Methodist Educator of Antebellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 2 (May 1982): 136-46.

Thornton's efforts to establish Methodist institutions of higher learning in the greater Jackson area, 1841-60: Centenary College in Brandon Springs (Rankin Co.), the College of Jackson (Hinds Co.), and Brandon College (later Madison College) in Sharon (Madison Co.).


Rogers, William Warren, Jr. "Train Robbing in Mississippi: Rube Barrow Strikes at Duck Hill and Buckatunna." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 2 (May 1992): 149-61.

Robberies in Montgomery and Wayne counties led by the notorious outlaw and his gang, 1888-89, and the capture and killing of Barrow in 1890.


Roland, Charles P. "The Ever-Vanishing South." Journal of Southern History 47 (Feb. 1982): 3-20.

Uses works of history, literature, social criticism, and popular culture to trace the transformation of the region since the Civil War; focuses on Mississippi writers William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, and Tennessee Williams.


Romaine, Anne Cooke. "The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Through August, 1964." M.A. thesis, University of Virginia, 1970. iv, 390 pp.

Introductory chapter on the MFDP and interviews with fourteen party members.


Rose, Willie L. "Historical Notes on Black Lawyers in Mississippi." Mississippi Lawyer 33, no. 5 (Mar./Apr. 1987): 14-15.

Includes list of names and brief biographical sketches, 1870s-1980s.


Ross, Cecil S.H. "Charles D. Fontaine: A Mississippi Know-Nothing Leader." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 2 (May 1986): 105-18.

Fontaine, a lawyer from Pontotoc (Pontotoc Co.) and former states' rights Democrat, was nominated for governor by the American Party in 1855.


Ross, Cecil S. Hilliard. "Dying Hard, Dying Fast: The Know-Nothing Experience in Mississippi." Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1982. 273 l.

Examines the rhetoric, ideology, and personalities of the American ("Know-Nothing") Party of the 1850s.


Ross, Cecil S.H. "Pulpit and Stump: The Clergy and the Know-Nothings in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 4 (Nov. 1986): 271-82.

Problematic clerical involvement in the American Party of the 1850s; includes mentions of Methodist clergymen William Winans and Augustus Baldwin Longstreet.


Ross, Ishbel. First Lady of the South: The Life of Mrs. Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1958. xii, 475 pp.

Sympathetic popular biography of Varina Anne Banks Howell (1826-1906), second wife of Jefferson Davis.


Roth, Regina Susan. "Social Critics of the Ante-Bellum South: Three Southwestern Humorists-Augustus B. Longstreet, Johnson J. Hooper, George W. Harris." M.A. thesis, Columbia University, 1964. 89 l.

Includes one chapter on the life and writings of Longstreet (1790-1870), president of the University of Mississippi and author of Georgia Scenes (1835) and other stories and sketches.


Rothert, Otto A. Outlaws of Cave-in-Rock: Historical Accounts of the Famous Highwaymen and River Pirates Who Operated in Pioneer Days upon the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and over the Old Natchez Trace. Cleveland, Ohio: Arthur A. Clark, 1924. 364 pp.

Includes one chapter on the activities of outlaw Samuel Mason (c. 1750-c. 1803) on the Natchez Trace and scattered references to Wiley and William (Micajah) Harpe and other outlaws.


Rothschild, Mary A. A Case of Black and White: Northern Volunteers and the Southern Freedom Summers, 1964-65. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1982. Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies, no. 69. xiv, 213 pp.

Examines backgrounds of volunteers and consequences of their involvement; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Northern Volunteers and the Southern 'Freedom Summers,' 1964-1965: A Social History," University of Washington, 1974.


Rothschild, Mary Aicken. "The Volunteers and the Freedom Schools: Education for Social Change in Mississippi." History of Education Quarterly 22, no. 4 (Winter 1982): 401-20.

Origin, accomplishments, and legacy of Mississippi freedom schools of 1964-65.


Rothschild, Mary Aicken. "White Women Volunteers in the Freedom Summers: Their Life and Work in a Movement for Social Change." Feminist Studies 5, no. 3 (Fall 1979): 466-95.

Work of white women volunteers for CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), SCLC (Southern Christian Leadership Conference), and SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Comitttee), and the gender and racial dynamics of relationships among movement workers.


Rothstein, Morton. "The Ante-bellum South as a Dual Economy: A Tentative Hypothesis." Agricultural History 41, no. 4 (Oct. 1967): 373-82.

Portrays Natchez (Adams Co.) planter Stephen Duncan and his extended family, including the Gustine, Minor, Connor, and Mercer families, as a "capitalistic elite" within the larger plantation economy of the Lower South.


Routh, E.C. The Life Story of Dr. J.B. Gambrell. Oklahoma City, Okla.: the author, 1929. ix, 180 pp.

Biography of the Rev. James Bruton Gambrell (1841-1921), president of Mercer University and of the Southern Baptist Convention, who spent much of his childhood and early adulthood in Union, Lafayette, Clay, and Hinds counties, Mississippi.


Rowan, Carl T. Go South to Sorrow. N.Y.: Random House, 1957. 246 pp.

Includes chapters on U.S. senator James O. Eastland, the 1955 Emmett Till murder in Tallahatchie County, the 1955 Gus Courts shooting in Humphreys County, and several pages on Lexington (Holmes Co.) newspaper editor Hazel Brannon Smith (1914-94).


Rowe, Melodia B. Captain Jones-The Biography of a Builder. [Hamilton, Ohio]: [Hill-Brown Printing], [1942]. 262 pp.

Undocumented biography of Joseph T. Jones (1842-1916), founder of the Gulf and Ship Island Railroad and the city of Gulfport (Harrison Co.).


Rowland, Buford. "William Wordsworth and Mississippi Bonds." Journal of Southern History 1 (Feb.-Nov. 1935): 501-507.

So disturbed was the English poet by Mississippi's default on Planter's Bank bonds, of which his daughter and other kin were holders, that he wrote a sonnet of remonstrance in 1842.


Rowland, Dunbar. Courts, Judges, and Lawyers of Mississippi, 1798-1935. Jackson: State Department of Archives and History and the Mississippi Historical Society, 1935. viii, 409.

Includes biographical sketches of prominent jurists and a brief history of the Mississippi State Bar Association.


Rowland, Dunbar. "Did De Soto Discover the Mississippi River in Tunica County, Miss.?" Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (Centenary Series, 1918): 144-48.

Suggests that Hernando de Soto crossed the river in 1541 at Willow Point (Tunica Co.), rather than upriver near Memphis.


Rowland, Dunbar. History of Mississippi: The Heart of the South. Chicago: S.J. Clarke, 1925. 2 vols.

Undocumented history by the director of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History places particular emphasis on the Civil War.


Rowland, Dunbar. Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898. N.p., n.d. 586 pp.

Cover the War of 1812, the Seminole War, the Mexican War, the Civil War, and the Spanish-American War.


Rowland, Dunbar. "Mississippi's First Constitution and Its Makers." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 6 (1902): 79-90.

Describes the forty-seven delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1817 in Washington (Adams Co.).


Rowland, Dunbar. Mississippi: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Town, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. Atlanta: Southeastern Historical, 1907. 3 vols.

Gazetteer/biographical dictionary/encyclopedia; published simultaneously under the title Encyclopedia of Mississippi History: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons (Madison, Wis.: Selwyn A. Brant, 1907).


Rowland, Dunbar. "Political and Parliamentary Orators and Oratory of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 357-400.

Biographical sketches of nineteenth-century orators George Poindexter, Sargeant S. Prentiss, Robert J. Walker, John I. Guion, Joseph Holt, Franklin E. Plummer, Henry S. Foote, Jefferson Davis, Alexander K. McClung, Albert Gallatin Brown, Jacob Thompson, W.S. Featherstone, L.Q.C. Lamar, Edward L. Walthall, James Z. George, James L. Alcorn, Joseph W. Chalmers, H.H. Chalmers, James R. Chalmers, Van H. Manning, and Ethelbert Barksdale.


Rowland, Dunbar. "The Rise and Fall of Negro Rule in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 189-200.

Account of the overthrow of Reconstruction by Democratic leaders in the state in 1876.


Rowland, Dunbar, ed. A Symposium on the Place of Discovery of the Mississippi River by Hernando de Soto. Jackson: Mississippi State Department of Archives and History, 1927. 103 pp.

Includes essay on de Soto's route and his contemporary chroniclers by T.H. Lewis and essays on the location of the river crossing by Dunbar Rowland, J.P. Young, and Charles A. Barton.


Rowland, Eron. Varina Howell: Wife of Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1927-31. 2 vols.

Thinly documented biography of Davis's second wife (1826-1906); includes two introductory chapters on her Howell and Kempe ancestors.


Rowland, Mrs. Dunbar [Eron]. History of Hinds County, Mississippi, 1821-1922. Jackson, Miss.: Jones Printing, 1922. 63 pp.

Brief undocumented history published for the centennial of the city of Jackson.


Rowland, Mrs. Dunbar [Eron]. "Marking the Natchez Trace: An Historic Highway of the Lower South." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 345-61.

Early argument for restoring the old road lists historically significant sites along the route.


Rowland, Mrs. Dunbar [Eron]. "Mississippi Territory in the War of 1812." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (Centenary Series, 1921): 7-233.

Book-length treatment of the war in Mississippi and Alabama includes information on first governor David Holmes, General Ferdinand L. Claiborne, and Major Thomas Hinds; list of soldiers appended.


Rowland, Mrs. Dunbar [Eron]. "Peter Chester, Third Governor of the Province of West Florida under British Dominion, 1770-1781." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 5 (Centenary Series, 1925): 1-183.

Includes biographical sketch of Chester (c. 1717-1799).


Rowland, Thomas Buford. "Legal Status of the Negro in Mississippi from 1832 to 1860." M.A. thesis, University of Wisconsin, 1933. 67 l.

Statutes, court cases, and provisions of the state constitution of 1832 pertaining to slaves and free blacks.


Royal, Philip R. "Mississippi's Confederate Loyalists." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1962. 76 l.

Overview of Confederate actions on the battlefield and on the home front.


Rubin, Anne Sarah. "Reflections on the Death of Emmett Till." Southern Cultures 2, no. 1 (Fall 1995): 45-66.

Examines accounts of Till's 1955 murder in Tallahatchie County and assesses the significance and synbolism of the event.


Ruby, Roy H. "The Presidential Election of 1944 in Mississippi: The Bolting Electors." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1966. 72 l.

Threat by three Electoral College electors to vote against President Franklin D. Roosevelt because of their perceptions of his racial views.


Ruff, Hazel Shelton. "The History of Hinds County, Mississippi, Before 1860." M.A. thesis, Duke University, 1941. v, 180 l.

County history, 1820-60, emphasizes planter lifestyle and education and religion and cultural life in Jackson and Clinton.


Rummel, George Albert. "The Delta Chinese: An Exploratory Study in Assimilation." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1966. vii, 115 l.

Includes population statistics, immigration to Mississippi during Reconstruction, exclusion from public schools, and large-scale Baptist conversion.


Rundle, Mrs. John [Bowden Hudson]. History of Grenada County Baptist Association, 1921-1960. Grenada, Miss.: Baptist, 1961. 47 pp.

Includes brief history of the association.


Russell, Mattie. "Land Speculation in Tippah County, 1836-1861." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1940. ix, 85 l.

Profits made by at least thirty individual speculators and land companies who each bought more than two thousand acres of Chickasaw Cession land and resold it to settlers.


Rutledge, Wilmuth Saunders. "The John J. Henry-Theodore G. Bilbo Encounter, 1911." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 4 (Nov. 1972): 357-72.

Describes the pistol-whipping of Bilbo by his opponent in the lieutenant governor's race and his victory in the election after depicting himself as a martyr.


Rutledge, Wilmuth Saunders. "Dueling in Antebellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 3 (Aug. 1964): 181-91.

Laws respecting dueling and examples of duels fought, 1811-61.


Ryan, J.S., and T.J. Murphree. History of Calhoun County, Mississippi. Pittsboro, Mississippi: Calhoun Monitor, 1904. 49 l.

History from 1852 to 1899 includes nine biographical sketches and local Civil War company rol


Sabin, David B. "Ira A. Batterton and the Vicksburg Daily Herald, an Unconditional Union Newspaper." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1968. iii, 80 l.

Content, editorials, and circulation of a Warren County paper published in 1864 and 1865.


Sachs, David Helburn. "The Work of Overstreet and Town: The Coming of Modern Architecture to Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Michigan, 1986. 365 l.

Jackson (Hinds Co.) architectural firm of Albert Hays Town and N.W. Overstreet designed many public buildings and private homes in the region from 1926 to 1939.


Sacks, Benjamin. "A Jefferson Davis Sequel." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 4 (Nov. 1989): 357-76.

The life of Davis's younger daughter Margaret Howell Davis Hayes (b. 1855) after the end of the Civil War.


Sacks, Benjamin. "Varina Howell Davis: A Wife's Vigil." Journal of Mississippi History 61, no. 2 (May 1994): 107-27.

Recalls Varina Davis's efforts to ameliorate the conditions under which her husband was being held at Fort Monroe, Virginia, in 1865 and 1866.


Salamon, Lester Milton. "Protest, Politics, and Modernization in the American South: Mississippi as a Developing Society." Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard University, 1971. 2 vols.

Assesses the state's prospects for economic development through an examination of its history (volume one) and political participation by its African American citizens (volume two).


Sallis, William Charles. "The Color Line in Mississippi Politics, 1865-1915." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Kentucky, 1967. 465 l.

Argues that racism has dominated the state's political, intellectual, and social consciousness; two chapters are devoted to governor and U.S. senator James K. Vardaman's racial ideology.


Sallis, William Charles. "A Study of the Life and Times of LeRoy Percy." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1957. 168 l.

Percy (1861-1929), Greenville (Washington Co.) planter and father of writer William Alexander Percy, also served briefly in the U.S. Senate.


Salmond, John A. "My Mind Set On Freedom": A History of the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1997. xi, 176 pp.

Brief history includes many mentions of Mississippi events.


Saltillo History Committee. The Life and Times of Saltillo. Fulton, Miss.: Itawamba County Times, 1979. 352 pp., [xii].

Includes brief essays on early history, businesses, physicians, schools, sports, government, Civil War, and churches in the Lee County community.


Sanders, Phyllis Moore. "Jefferson Davis: Reactionary Rebel, 1808-1861." Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 1976. 565 l.

Psychobiographical treatment pays particular attention to Davis's childhood and his troublesome relationship with his older brother Joseph.


Sanford, M., and R. Caire. The Past at the Pass. Pass Christian, Miss.: Lafayette, 1980. [18] pp.

Brief history of the Gulf Coast community of Pass Christian (Harrison Co.), 1699-1976.


Sansing, David G. "The Failure of Johnsonian Reconstruction in Mississippi, 1865-1866." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 4 (Nov. 1972): 373-90.

Examines actions and attitudes that led to the failure of president Andrew Johnson's liberal reconstruction plan.


Sansing, David. "A Happy Interlude: Jefferson Davis and the War Department, 1853-1857." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 4 (Nov. 1989): 297-312.

Davis's tenure as secretary of war under his friend Franklin Pierce; includes information on technical advances under Davis and his involvement in the sectional and political conflicts of the day.


Sansing, David G. "A History of Calhoun County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1959. viii, 109 l.

Covers geography, early settlement, government, agriculture, industry, religion, education, and population, 1852-1950s.


Sansing, David G., and Carroll Waller. A History of the Mississippi Governor's Mansion. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1977. ix, 220 pp.

History of the 1852 Jackson (Hinds Co.) mansion written after the 1975 renovation, which restored many of its classical revival features; includes many historical vignettes and photographs of first families.


Sansing, David G. Making Haste Slowly: The Troubled History of Higher Education in Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1990. xii, 309 pp.

Examines the establishment of public and private colleges and universities and the 1962 integration of the University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.); identifies factional politics and unnecessary duplication as defining themes throughout the history of higher education in the state.


Sansing, David G. Mississippi: Its People and Culture. Minneapolis, Minn.: T.S. Denison, 1981. 406 pp.

Grade school textbook.


Sansing, David G. "Mississippi's Four Constitutions." Mississippi Law Journal 56, no. 1 (Apr. 1986): 3-15.

Deals with the state constitutions of 1817, 1832, 1869, and 1890.


Sansing, David G., Sim C. Callon, and Carolyn Vance Smith. Natchez: An Illustrated History. Natchez, Miss.: Plantation, 1992. 192 pp.

Popular history of the Adams County city includes many photographs of antebellum mansions and their owners.


Sansing, David G. The Peoples Bank and Trust Co.: In Partnership with the Community. Fulton, Miss.: Itawamba County Times, 1989. vii, 141 pp.

History of the Tupelo (Lee Co.) bank, 1904-89.


Sansing, David Gaffney. "The Role of the Scalawag in Mississippi Reconstruction." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1969. 237 l.

Revisionist account refutes the negative image fastened on scalawags (native white Republicans) by a Democratic elite anxious to reclaim control of the state.


Sarin, Linda Emerson. "From the Home to the Community: A History of Nursing in Mississippi, 1870-1940." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1994. 419 l.

Traces the professionalization of nursing in the state.


Sartin, John Robert. "History of Copiah County to 1900." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1959. iv, 111 l.

History of the county from 1823, including information on geography, organization, communities, religion, transportation, communication, economy, education, Civil War and Reconstruction, and landmarks.


Satcher, Buford. "Blacks in Mississippi Politics, 1865-1900." Ph.D. dissertation, Oklahoma State University, 1976. 270 l.

Argues that Mississippi freedmen who voted and held office after the Civil War were neither controlled by northern Republicans nor intimidated by postbellum violence but that it ultimately requiredthe disfranchising provisions of the Constitution of 1890 to bar them from political participation.


Satterfield, Paul H. "Lincoln and Davis-Their Similarities." Civil War Times 2 (May 1960): unpaged.

Brief comparison notes similarities in intellect, families, and political outlook.


Satz, Ronald N. American Indian Policy in the Jacksonian Era. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1975. xii, 343 pp.

Chapter three, "The Test Case of the Removal Policy," deals with the removal of the Mississippi Choctaws after the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek and the Removal Act.


Saucier, Bobbie Wade. "Pat Harrison: Conservative New Dealer." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1960. 86 l.

Interwar senator Byron Patton "Pat" Harrison supported the New Deal but eventually broke with FDR, who supported Harrison's rival for president pro tem of the Senate.


Saucier, Bobbie Wade. "The Public Career of Theodore G. Bilbo." Ph.D. dissertation, Tulane University, 1971. 312 l.

Rise of Bilbo (1877-1947) from state senator to governor and U.S. senator; maintains that his "unrestrained racism," initially a ploy to appeal to poor whites, intensified after he served as chairman of the senate District of Columbia Committee.


Saul, Robert Lee. "The Development of the Episcopal Church in the Lower Tombigbee Prairie." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1949. 102 l.

Establishment of Episcopal churches in Lowndes, Monroe, Noxubee, Oktibbeha, and Clay counties, 1838-1935.


Saunders, Paul H. "Col. Felix Labauve." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 7 (1903): 131-40.

Biographical sketch of Labauve (1809-79) of Hernando (De Soto Co.), a native of France who bequeathed the bulk of his estate to the University of Mississippi to establish a scholarship fund for De Soto County boys.


Saunders, Robert. "Southern Populists and the Negro, 1893-1905." Journal of Negro History 54, no. 3 (July 1969): 240-61.

Includes mention of Mississippi's leading role in restricting African American voting and the 1895 gubernatorial campaign of Frank Burkitt, who supported Negro schools.


Sawyer, Charles. The Arrival of B.B. King: The Authorized Biography. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1980. xiv, 274 pp.

Life of blues singer Riley "B.B." King, born in 1925 near Itta Bena (Leflore Co.) and raised in Kilmichael (Montgomery Co.).


Scales, Lura L. "Mississippi Public Schools, 1870-1876." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1969. vii, 151 l.

Refutes the notion that whites violently opposed public schools established during Reconstruction.


Scanlon, John. "The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1878 in the Diocese of Natchez." Catholic Historical Review 40 (Apr. 1954): 27-45.

Recounts high death toll of Catholic priests and nuns who worked among the sick in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Canton (Madison Co.), Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.), and Holly Springs (Marshall Co.).


Scarborough, Thomas A.H. "The Bislands of Natchez: Sugar, Secession, and Strategies for Survival." Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 1 (Spring 1996): 23-62.

Traces one of the oldest plantation families in Warren County from the Revolution to Reconstruction; they faced financial ruin when they failed to adapt their sugar cane farming operation to paid labor.


Scarborough, William K. "Lords or Capitalists? The Natchez Nabobs in Comparative Perspective." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 3 (Aug. 1992): 239-67.

Comparison of planters owning more than 250 slaves in the Natchez District to those in the South Carolina Low Country and in Georgia; contrasts their varying origins, investment strategies, age of plantation empires, and political behaviors.


Scarborough, William K. The Overseer: Plantation Management in the Old South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1966. xv, 256 pp.

Debunks the "overseer myth" by delineating his duties and status within the plantation economy and in the larger society, including numerous examples from Mississippi plantations; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Plantation Management in the South: The Overseer," University of North Carolina, 1962.


Scarborough, William Kauffman. "The Southern Plantation Overseer: A Re-Evaluation." Agricultural History 38, no. 1 (Jan. 1964): 13-20.

Condenses arguments in the author's doctoral dissertation and book; mentions overseers on Mississippi plantations in Lowndes, Hinds, and Leake counties.


Schaff, Morris. Jefferson Davis: His Life and Personality. Boston: John W. Luce, 1922. 277 pp.

Undocumented popular biography.


Schilling, George Edward. "The Survey of Federal Archives in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 4 (Oct. 1939): 207-16.

History of the project, a division of the New Deal Works Progress Administration, 1935-39.


Schilling, T.C. Abstract History of the Mississippi Baptist Association for One Hundred Years from Its Preliminary Organization in 1806 to the Centennial Session in 1906. New Orleans: J.G. Hauser, n.d. 269 pp., [vi].

Abstracted minutes of the association's meetings interspersed with biographical sketches of pastors.


Schlauch, Wolfgang. "Representative William Colmer and Senator James O. Eastland and the Reconstruction of Germany, 1945." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 3 (Aug. 1972): 193-213.

Efforts of Colmer and Eastland to modify American policy toward defeated Germany in order to aid in the nation's economic reconstruction.


Schlenker, Jon A. "An Historical Analysis of the Family Life of the Choctaw Indians." Southern Quarterly 13, no. 4 (July 1975): 323-34.

Examines Choctaw family life, 1600s-1900s.


Schlup, Leonard. "Bourbon Democrat: Thomas C. Catchings and the Repudiation of Silver Monometallism." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 3 (Fall 1995): 207-23.

Political career, 1885-1901, of congressman Catchings (1847-1927) of Hinds County, focusing on his membership in the "gold wing" of the Democratic Party.


Schlup, Leonard. "Hernando De Soto Money: War Advocate and Anti-Imperialist, 1898-1900." Journal of Mississippi History 60, no. 4 (Winter 1998): 315-39.

Presents the positions of U.S. senator Money (1839-1912) on the Spanish-American War and the annexation of the Philippines.


Schmidt, Aimee. "Down Around Biloxi: Culture and Identity in the Biloxi Seafood Industry." Mississippi Folklife 28, no. 1 (Winter/Spring 1995): 6-12, 14-16.

Culture and ethnicity of workers in the industry, the basis of the economy of Biloxi (Harrison Co.) since 1881.


Schmidt, C.E. Ocean Springs, French Beachhead. Pascagoula, Miss.: Lewis Printing, 1972. v, 142 pp.

Narrative history of Ocean Springs (Jackson Co.), 1699-1972.


Schmidt, William T. "The Impact of Camp Shelby in World War II on Hattiesburg, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 1 (Feb. 1977): 41-50.

Socioeconomic impact of a military installation on the surrounding (Forrest Co.) community, 1940-45; based on the author's master's thesis, "Some Selected Aspects of the Impact of the Camp Shelby Mobilization on Hattiesburg, Mississippi, 1940-1946," University of Southern Mississippi, 1970, and his Ph.D. dissertation, "The Impact of the Camp Shelby Mobilization on Hattiesburg, Mississippi, 1940-1946," University of Southern Mississippi, 1972.


Schoenleber, Charles Herbert. "The Rise of the New West: Frontier Political Pressure, State-Federal Conflict, and the Removal of the Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Cherokees, 1815-1837." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1986. 490 l.

Examines economic and political factors that led to Indian removal from Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi.


Scholtes, Colleen C., and L.J. Scholtes. Biloxi and the Mississippi Gulf Coast: A Pictorial History. Norfolk, Va.: Donning, 1985. 219 pp.

Heavily illustrated volume includes information on Bay St. Louis and Waveland (Hancock Co.); Gulfport, Pass Christian, Long Beach, Biloxi, and Cat and Ship Islands (Harrison Co.); and Ocean Springs, Moss Point, Pascagoula, and Gautier (Jackson Co.).


"The School of the Four Hills." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 46 (June 1988): 5-6.

Antebellum school near Macon operated for the children of the Bowen, Bryson, Allgood, and Allen families.


Schweikert, Larry. Banking in the American South from the Age of Jackson to Reconstruction. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1987. xiv, 367 pp.

Includes two subsections: "Regulatory Policy in Mississippi," on the antebellum period, and "The Bank of the State of Mississippi as a Case Study in Loan Demand," on the 1830s.


Schwendemann, Glen. "St. Louis and the 'Exodusters' of 1879." Journal of Negro History 46, no. 1 (Jan. 1961): 32-46.

Examines problems experienced by freedmen who left plantations in Mississippi and Louisiana for Kansas; many of them eventually relocated to St. Louis, Missouri.


Scott, Anne Firor. "After Suffrage: Southern Women in the Twenties." Journal of Southern History 30 (1964): 298-318.

Suffragist Nellie Nugent Somerville of Greenville (Washington Co.) mentioned.


Scott, Anne Firor. "The 'New Woman' in the New South." South Atlantic Quarterly 61, no. 4 (Autumn 1962): 473-83.

Mentions Mississippians Belle Kearney and Nellie Nugent Somerville.


Scott, Anne Firor. "A Progressive Wind from the South, 1906-1913." Journal of Southern History 29, no. 1 (Feb. 1963): 53-70.

Examines the antecedents of Wilsonian liberalism among southern congressmen, including John Sharp Williams.


Scott, R.W. Glory in Conflict: A Saga of Byron De La Beckwith. Camden, Ark.: Camark, 1991. iii, 382 pp.

Undocumented account of the 1963 murder of civil rights leader Medgar Evers in Jackson (Hinds Co.); highly sympathetic to convicted killer Beckwith, the author suggests "alternate solutions" to the crime.


Scott, Roy V. Eugene Beverly Ferris and Agricultural Science in the Lower South. University, Miss.: Center for the Study of Southern Culture, University of Mississippi, 1991. viii, 235 pp.

Career of Ferris (1873-1954), who worked for the Mississippi Agricultural Experiment Station in Starkville (Oktibbeha Co.) and Holly Springs (Marshall Co.).


Scott, Roy V. "Land Grants for Higher Education in Mississippi: A Survey." Agricultural History 43, no. 3 (July 1969): 357-68.

Federal land grants, 1803-95, to Jefferson College (Adams Co.), the University of Mississippi (Lafayette Co.), Alcorn College (Claiborne/Jefferson counties), Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College (Oktibbeha Co.), and Industrial Institute and College (Lowndes Co.).


Scott, Roy V., and J.G. Shoalmire. The Public Career of Cully A. Cobb: A Study in Agricultural Leadership. Jackson: University and College Press of Mississippi, 1973. viii, 287 pp.

Cobb (b. 1884) was a pioneer in agricultural extension, an agricultural journalist, and an administrator of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration during the New Deal.


Scott, Thomas Clayton. "A Brief History of the Mississippi Publishers Corporation." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1990. vii, 81 l.

History, 1937-89, of the Hederman family corporation, which owned television and radio stations and newspapers, including the Jackson Daily News and Clarion-Ledger.


Scruggs, Arthur E. "An Economic and Social History of Pearl River County." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1933. 98 l.

Emphasizes the use of natural resources in the local economy.


Seal, Albert Garrel. "John Carmichael Jenkins: Scientific Planter of the Natchez District." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1939): 14-28.

Horticulturalist Jenkins (1809-55) experimented with methods of fruit and cotton cultivation, 1840s-1855, on Elgin Plantation; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, Louisiana State University, 1937.


Seal, Enoch, Jr. "The Senatorial Career of Theodore Gilmore Bilbo." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1951. 123 l.

Examines Bilbo's speeches, his race-baiting tactics, and his relationship with New Dealers while in the U.S. Senate, 1934-47.


Seale, Lea L. "Indian Place-Names in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, 1939. 224 l.

Linguistic analysis of geographical names, especially those derived from the Choctaw language.


Seawright, Phyllis Woodard. "Natchez Theatre, 1852-1940: Yearning for Fame." Ph.D. dissertation, Florida State University, 1996. x, 320 l.

Argues that Natchez (Adams Co.) tried unsuccessfully to dominate regional theater and that the city only found recognition later through the pilgrimage balls and pageants that originated in the 1930s.


Sedevie, Donna Elizabeth. "The Prospect of Happiness: Women, Divorce and Property." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 3 (Fall 1995): 189-206.

Examines divorce law in the Mississippi Territory, focusing on the 1803 divorce and alimony act, which, the author contends, made divorce more easily obtainable in the early nineteenth century than most historians have believed.


Sellers, James Truman. "A History of the Jackson State Times: An Agent of Change in a Closed Society." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1992. ix, 302 l.

Brief lifespan, 1954-62, of the newspaper founded to fight the Hederman monopoly of Jackson (Hinds Co.) dailies.


Sessions, Cora Emilie. "Davis-Douglas Senate Debates." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1930. 87 l.

Debates between Stephen Douglas of Illinois and Jefferson Davis of Mississippi over issues of popular sovereignty, the Lecompton Constitution, the Dred Scott decision, and the Freeport Doctrine.


Sewell, George A. "Hiram Rhodes Revels: Another Evaluation." Negro History Bulletin 38, no. 1 (Dec. 1974/Jan. 1975): 336-39.

Biographical sketch of Revels (1827-1901), the first African American U.S. senator and the first president of Alcorn A&M College (Jefferson/Claiborne counties).


Sewell, George Alexander. Mississippi Black History Makers. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1977. xii, 420 pp.

Thirty-six biographical essays and information on over sixty other prominent African Americans, including politicians, educators, musicians, actors, writers, civil rights leaders, and others.


Shackelford, Nora Jeanne. "The Leflore Family and Choctaw Indian Removal." M.A. thesis, Oklahoma State University, 1967. 105 l.

Includes chapters on Louis Leflore (d. 1833) and his son Greenwood (1800-65), including the latter's involvement in removal when he was chief of the Choctaws.


Shadburn, Mary Lynn. "A Social History of Jackson, Mississippi, 1930-1939." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1969. 147 l.

Based largely on Jackson (Hinds Co.) newspapers, emphasizes social life, education, and religion.


Shafer, Carlie Joyce Carroll. "A Study of Historical and Legal Factors Influencing the Desegregation Process of the Public Schools in Mississippi." Ed.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1971. 174 l.

Primarily a study of public school desegregation in Mississippi as of 1971, but also includes analysis of 218 relevant court cases, many of which preceded the 1954 Brown decision.


Shafer, Harry J. "An Evaluation of the Natchez Occupation at the Fatherland Site." Journal of Mississippi History 34, no. 3 (Aug. 1972): 215-35.

Analysis of previously published research confirms that the Fatherland Site near Natchez (Adams Co.) was the location of the Grand Village of the Natchez as described by European observers in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.


Shanahan, Frank E., Jr. "L.Q.C. Lamar: An Evaluation." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 2 (May 1964): 91-122.

Reviews Lamar's career and briefly evaluates his fitness for the U.S. Supreme Court and his reputation as a conciliator.


Shank, George Kline, Jr. "Meridian: A Mississippi City at Birth, During the Civil War, and in Reconstruction." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 4 (Nov. 1964): 275-82.

Recounts the destruction in and around Meridian (Lauderdale Co.) by Union general William T. Sherman's troops in February 1864; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, Mississippi State University, 1961, which, unlike the article, does include information about the city's founding and Reconstruction violence.


Shank, Jack. Meridian: The Queen with a Past. Meridian, Miss.: Southeastern Printing, 1985. 2 vols.

Includes chapters on the founding of the Lauderdale County city, Civil War and Reconstruction, education, society, religion, race relations, local government, newspapers, railroads, businesses, and the Jewish community; volume two reprints the author's columns for the Meridian Star.


Shapiro, Herbert. White Violence and Black Response: From Reconstruction to Montgomery. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988. xvi, 565 pp.

Includes scattered references to Mississippi and a small section on Willie McGee, whose 1951 execution for rape in Laurel (Jones Co.) followed extensive publicity by the American Communist Party.


Shapiro, Samuel. "A Black Senator from Mississippi: Blanche K. Bruce, 1841-1898." Review of Politics 44, no. 1 (Jan. 1982): 83-109.

Life and career of the ex-slave who became a U.S. senator.


Sharp, James Roger. The Jacksonians versus the Banks: Politics in the States after the Panic of 1837. N.Y.: Columbia University Press, 1970. xii, 392 pp.

Includes chapters on challenges to the Mississippi Democratic Party following the Panic of 1837 and on political/sectional differences in the state; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Banking and Politics in the States: The Democratic Party after the Panic of 1837," University of California, 1967.


Sharp, Thomas Page. "An Economic and Historical Study of the Columbus and Greenville Railway Company." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1959. 96 l.

Includes some historical information about the railroad, originally called the Greenville, Columbus, and Birmingham until its reorganization in 1923.


Shaw, Harmon Dean, Jr. "Mississippi and the Election of 1932." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 74 l.

Campaign year characterized by a factionalized and ineffective Republican Party and squabbling over redistricting necessitated by the loss of a congressional seat.


Shaw, Helen Louise. British Administration of the Southern Indians, 1756-1783. N.Y.: AMS Press, 1931. xix, 206 pp.

Chapter four, "The Southern Indians in the Revolution, 1778-1783," reprints the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, Bryn Mawr College, 1929.


Shaw, Ruby E. "Early Development of Transportation Facilities in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Tulane University, 1931. 90 l.

Deals with overland, water, and rail transportation.


Shawhan, Dorothy. "Women Behind the Woman Voter." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 2 (May 1987): 115-28.

Based on correspondence between Minnie Brewer, editor and publisher of the state League of Women Voters newspaper, 1922-24, and Lucy Somerville, later a state legislator and judge.


Shay, Frank. Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years. N.Y.: I. Washburn, 1938. 288 pp.

Mentions of the John Hartfield, Al Young, Luther Holbert, R.J. Tyronne, T.A. Allen, Bearden brothers, J.B. Grant, and other lynchings in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Jackson (Hinds Co.), Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.), Rocky Ford, and Duck Hill (Montgomery Co.).


Sheffield, David A., and Darnell L. Nicovich. Edited by Julia Cook Guice. When Biloxi Was the Seafood Capital of the World. Biloxi, Miss.: Biloxi City Council, 1979. 75 pp.

Traces development of the seafood industry in the 1880s; includes biographies of industry leaders.


Shellberg, Kenneth L. "The Biloxi: An Introduction." Mississippi Archaeology 10, no. 3 (Mar. 1975): 2-9.

Brief history of the Gulf Coast tribe.


Shelton, Vernon Scott. "The Political Career of Paul Burney Johnson, Sr." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1979. ii, 71 l .

Portrays Johnson (1880-1943), governor of Mississippi from 1940 to 1944, as a populist progressive.


Shelton, William Allen. The Young Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Arno, 1982. 282 pp.

Davis's childhood and young adulthood in Kentucky and Mississippi, at West Point, in the Black Hawk and Mexican wars, and in Congress; reprints the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Young Jefferson Davis, 1808-1846," University of Kentucky, 1977.


Shenton, James P. Robert John Walker: A Politician from Jackson to Lincoln. N.Y.: Columbia University Press, 1961. xviii, 288 pp.

Only published biography of Walker (1801-69), controversial U.S. senator, secretary of the treasury, governor of Kansas, and special financial agent to Europe under Abraham Lincoln.


Sheppard, Eric William. Bedford Forrest, the Confederacy's Greatest Cavalryman. N.Y.: Dial; Toronto: Longmans, Green, 1930. 320 pp.

Biography of General Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-77).


Sherrill, Robert. Gothic Politics in the Deep South: Stars of the New Confederacy. N.Y.: Grossman, 1968. 335 pp.

Anecdotal review of modern southern politics includes "Jim Eastland, Child of Scorn," which describes Mississippi political culture in the 1950s and 1960s.


Shields, John Robert, Jr. "Half-Sheets and Hope: Mississippi Newspapers in the Civil War." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1974. ix, 140 l.

War years viewed through state newspapers.


Shields, Joseph D. The Life and Times of Seargent Smith Prentiss. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1883. 442 pp.

Biography of Prentiss (1808-50) of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) and Natchez (Adams Co.), lawyer, orator, and Whig congressman; volume reprints many of his speeches.


Shields, Joseph Dunbar. Edited by Elizabeth Dunbar Murray. Natchez: Its Early History. Louisville, Ky.: John P. Morton, 1930. 274 pp.

History of Natchez (Adams Co.) from 1720 to 1820, written by Judge Shields, who died in 1886.


Shivers, Lyda Gordon. "A History of the Mississippi Penitentiary." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1930. 94 l.

Mostly devoted to discussion of the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century convict lease system and its demise.


Shlomowitz, Ralph. "'Bound' or 'Free'? Black Labor in Cotton and Sugarcane Farming, 1865-1880." Journal of Southern History 50, no. 4 (Nov. 1984): 569-96.

Asserts that sharecropping originated in the free operation of market forces and denies that it was a form of coercive labor control; cites Ronald L.F. Davis's work on the Natchez District, which holds that freedmen refused to work in any other labor system.


Shostak, David A. "Crosby Smith: Forgotten Witness to a Mississippi Nightmare." Negro History Bulletin 38, no. 1 (Dec. 1974/Jan. 1975): 320-25.

Based on interview with Smith (b. 1908) of Sumner (Tallahatchie Co.) about the 1955 Emmett Till murder; includes photographs of locations related to the murder and subsequent trial.


Shue, W.D. "The Cotton Oil Industry." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 253-92.

History of the development, 1850s-1900, of the cotton oil industry, which helped to compensate for falling cotton fiber prices.


Shurden, Irene Long. "A History of Washington County, Mississippi, to 1900." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1963. vi, 117 l.

Covers geography, settlement, county establishment, Indian removal, Civil War and Reconstruction, agriculture, and flood control.


Sibley, Lucy Roy. "A Historical Study of Clothing Practices on Some Mississippi Plantations, 1838-1861." M.A. thesis, Auburn University, 1958. [7], 50 l.

Scatttered references, mostly from secondary sources, to types of clothing and fabrics; few mentions of specific plantations.


Siebert, Wilbur H. "The Loyalists in West Florida and the Natchez District." Mississippi Valley Historical Review 4 (Mar. 1916): 465-83.

Includes discussion of activities of pro-British settlers in and around Natchez (Adams Co.) when it was part of British West Florida, 1764-81; article was also printed in volume eight (1914-15) of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association Proceedings.


Silbernagel, Charles J. "An Economic History of Rankin County." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1966. vi, 118 l.

History of the county since its organization in 1828 emphasizes twentieth-century economic development.


Sillers, Florence Warfield, et al. History of Bolivar County, Mississippi. Jackson, Miss.: Mississippi Delta Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, 1948. ix, 634 pp.

Collection of historical essays, vignettes, and many biographical sketches, including a small number on African American men and white women.


Sillers, Walter, Sr. "Flood Control in Bolivar County, 1838-1924." Journal of Mississippi History 9, no. 1 (Jan. 1947): 3-20.

Written in 1924 by an officer of the state levee system, the article accurately predicted that safeguards would be implemented only following a disastrous flood.


Silver, James W. "A Counter-Proposal to the Indian Removal Policy of Andrew Jackson." Journal of Mississippi History 4, no. 4 (Oct. 1942): 207-15.

General Edmund Pendleton Gaines's alternative to removal included suggestions for education and acculturation, 1810s-1830s.


Silver, James W. Edmund Pendleton Gaines: Frontier General. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1949. xxi, 291 pp.

Includes discussion of the survey by Gaines (1777-1849) of the Natchez Trace in 1801-1802 and his capture of Aaron Burr in 1807.


Silver, James W. "The Hardwood Producers Come of Age." Journal of Southern History 22, no. 4 (Nov. 1957): 427-53.

History of the lumber industry in the South, 1890s-1920s, and of the Hardwood Manufacturers Institute; Mississippi, with over twelve hundred mills, figures prominently in the article.


Silver, James W. "Land Speculation Profits in the Chickasaw Cession." Journal of Southern History 10, no. 1 (Feb. 1944): 84-92.

Case study of land speculation after 1832 in what it now Tippah and Tate counties shows that speculators profited less than individual landowners and land companies.


Silver, James W. Mississippi: The Closed Society. N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1963. xxii, 250 pp.

Account by a history professor at the University of Mississippi of the controversy surrounding the admission of the university's first known African American student, James Meredith, in 1962; also includes background on the history of segregationist sentiment in the state.


Silver, James Wesley. "North Carolinians in Mississippi History." North Carolina Historical Review 22, no. 1 (Jan. 1945): 42-57.

Migration of North Carolinians to Mississippi, 1800-50; identifies 130 who achieved prominence in politics, law, medicine, and the military.


Silver, James W. "Paul Bunyon Comes to Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1957): 93-119.

History and folklore of the Carrier Lumber and Manufacturing Company of Panola and Quitman counties, 1901-29.


Simmons, Carolyn Virginia. "Winthrop Sargent, Territorial Governor of Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1934. 70 l.

Favorable assessment of Sargent's effectiveness as the first governor of the Mississippi Territory, 1798-1801.


Simmons, Thomas E. The Brown Condor: The True Adventures of John C. Robinson. Silver Spring, Md.: Bartleby, 1988. x, 198 pp.

Popular biography of African American pilot Robinson (b. 1903) of Gulfport (Harrison Co.).


Simms, L. Moody, Jr. "Joseph G. Baldwin's 'Stocking a Laugh'-A Hitherto Uncollected Flush Times Sketch." Alabama Historical Quarterly 33, nos. 3 & 4 (Fall and Winter 1971): 210-17.

Includes brief sketch of Baldwin's life (1815-64) and works; bulk of the article reprints the only one of Baldwin's sketches for the Southern Literary Messenger not included in his popular book, The Flush Times of Alabama and Mississippi (1853).


Simms, L. Moody, Jr. "Theodore DuBose Bratton, Christian Principles, and the Race Question." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 1 (Feb. 1976): 47-52.

Argues that the Episcopal bishop of Mississippi's writings and speeches on race in the first two decades of the twentieth century, while considered moderate for his time, "helped further the cause of segregation and white supremacy."


Simonds, Edward P. "Test of Total War-Sherman's Meridian Expedition, February, 1864." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1961. 146 l.

Demonstrates that Union general William T. Sherman practiced "bumming" (destruction of property in an effort to break the spirits of enemy civilians) at Meridian (Lauderdale Co.); he later used the practice more famously in Georgia and the Carolinas.


Simonson, Walter E., and Bennett Strange. "Foote versus Davis: The Mississippi Election of 1851." Southern Speech Journal 27, no. 2 (Winter 1961): 126-34.

Dynamics of the gubernatorial campaign of 1851.


Simpson, Alexander J., Jr. "George L. Sheldon and the Beginnings of the Lily White Movement in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1962. 106 l.

Unsuccessful efforts by former Nebraska governor Sheldon to establish a white Republican Party, 1909-32; African American lawyer Perry Howard, head of the "black and tan" faction, controlled the party during the period.


Simpson, Ralph Ricardo. "William Grant Still, the Man and His Music." Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State University, 1964. 331 l.

First chapter reviews the life of the African American composer (1895-1978) from Woodville (Wilkinson Co.).


Simpson, Robert R. "The Origin of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 1 (Feb. 1973): 1-13.

Details the involvement of University of Mississippi professor of history Franklin L. Riley in the establishment of MDAH in 1902; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Origin of State Departments of Archives and History in the South," University of Mississippi, 1971.


Simpson, William. "The Birth of the Mississippi 'Loyalist Democrats' (1965-1968)." Journal of Mississippi History 44, no. 1 (Feb. 1982): 27-45.

Origin of the liberalization of the state's Democratic Party, including the conflict between the Freedom Democratic Party and the NAACP, their common support of Charles Evers's congressional bid, and the formation of the Loyal Democrats, who helped to move the party ideologically closer to the national party; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The 'Loyalist Democrats' of Mississippi: Challenge to a White Majority, 1965-1972," Mississippi State University, 1974.


Simpson, William M. "Rivalry for Empire: Choctaw and Chickasaw Relations with the English in the Eighteenth Century." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1972. 121 l.

Shifting alliances of the two tribes with the colonial powers of the day in the Lower Mississippi River Valley.


Singal, Daniel Joseph. The War Within: From Victorian to Modernist Thought in the South, 1919-1945. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1982. xvi, 453 pp.

Traces southern cultural transition in the interwar years by examining the lives of thirteen intellectuals, including William Faulkner (1897-1962) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Development of Modernism: Intellectual Life in the South, 1919-1941," Columbia University, 1976.


Singleton, Theresa A. "The Potential for African American Archaeology in Mississippi." Mississippi Archaeology 26, no. 2 (Dec. 1991): 19-32.

Calls for African American archaeological excavation, especially in the Natchez District, the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, and the Northeastern Prairie and Ridge.


Sinsheimer, Joseph A. "The Freedom Vote of 1963: New Strategies of Racial Protest in Mississippi." Journal of Southern History 55, no. 2 (May 1989): 217-44.

Argues that the mock gubernatorial campaign of Aaron Henry and Ed King "laid the groundwork" for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and served as a "dress rehearsal" for Freedom Summer.


Sistrom, Michael Paul. "Questioning America: The National Challenges of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party." M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina, 1992. iv, 170 l.

Reviews the party's unsuccessful seating challenge at the 1964 Democratic National Convention and its successful challenge of the state's congressional delegation the following year.


Sistrunk, H. Mason, et al, comps. Lumberton Heritage II. Lumberton, Miss.: Arrow Art, 1970. [157] pp.

Heavily illustrated pastiche of Lumberton and Lamar County history; includes a brief section on African American history.


Sitterson, J. Carlyle. "The William J. Minor Plantations: A Study in Ante-Bellum Absentee Ownership." Journal of Southern History 9, no. 3 (Aug. 1943): 59-74.

Everyday duties of Minor, owner of three Natchez area cotton plantations; notes from Minor's journals and workbooks describe aspects of slave life, including clothing, food, and shelter.


Skates, John R., Jr. "Fred Sullens and Prohibition." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 2 (May 1967): 83-94.

Evolution of Sullens's position on the prohibition of alcoholic beverages as revealed in his editorials in the Jackson Daily News, 1907-37.


Skates, John Ray. "Fred Sullens and the Growth of Organized Labor." Southern Quarterly 10, no. 4 (July 1972): 341-51.

Anti-labor views expressed by the Jackson Daily News editor, who opposed the National Industrial Recovery Act (1933) and the National Labor Relations [Wagner] Act (1935), but supported the Taft-Hartley Act (1947) and legislation disallowing strikes.


Skates, John Ray. "Fred Sullens: Bourbon Out of His Time." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 2 (May 1987): 93-104.

Portrays the fiery editor (d. 1957) of the Jackson Daily News as a nineteenth-century-style journalist and business conservative.


Skates, John Ray. "From Enchantment to Disillusionment: A Southern Editor Views the New Deal." Southern Quarterly 5, no. 4 (July 1967): 363-80.

Argues that the evolution of Jackson Daily News editor Fred Sullens's opinion of the New Deal typified that of many white southerners-initial enthusiastic support, followed by suspicion, and finally open hostility as the realization grew that FDR intended to "remake" the South.


Skates, John Ray, Jr. A History of the Mississippi Supreme Court, 1817-1948. Jackson: Mississippi Bar Foundation, 1973. x, 120 pp.

History of the court and biographical sketches of seventy-two justices.


Skates, John Ray. "Journalist vs. Politician: Fred Sullens and Theodore G. Bilbo." Southern Quarterly 8, no. 3 (Apr. 1970): 273-85.

Jackson Daily News editor's negative commentary on all phases of Bilbo's career, from lieutenant governor, governor, and U.S. senator to the U.S. Department of Justice investigation of Bilbo near the time of his death in 1947.


Skates, John R. "Mississippi History: A Theme." Southern Quarterly 6, no. 1 (Oct. 1967): 1-12.

Argues that white Mississippians' fear of African Americans-from slave insurrections and riots to racial amalgamation-has been the defining theme of Mississippi history.


Skates, John Ray, Jr. Mississippi's Present and Past. Fenton, Mich.: K.E. McRoberts, 1973. 92 pp.

Elementary school textbook.


Skates, John Ray. Mississippi: A Bicentennial History. N.Y.:W.W. Norton; Nashville, Tenn.: American Association for State and Local History, 1979. The States and the Nation series. xii, 188 pp.

Interpretive history intended for a general audience; includes a prologue that argues for the essential continuity of the state's history.


Skates, John Ray. Mississippi's Old Capitol: Biography of a Building. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1990. xi, 179.

Old Capitol in Jackson (Hinds Co.) from design and construction (1836-41) to restoration (1959-61) and rebirth as the Old Capitol Museum.


Skates, John Ray, Jr. "A Southern Editor Views the National Scene: Frederick Sullens and the Jackson, Mississippi, Daily News." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1965. 259 l.

Examines the conservative stance of the preeminent Mississippi newspaper editor (d. 1957) of his day; expands on the author's master's thesis, "A Southern Editor Looks at National Politics," Mississippi State University, 1962.


Skates, John R., Jr. "World War II as a Watershed in Mississippi History." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 2 (May 1975): 131-42.

Argues for the essential continuity of Mississippi history and culture, but identifies World War II as the harbinger of lasting political and racial changes within the state.


Skelton, Marion W. "The J.M. Tubb Administration: Twenty-Two Years of Progress in Mississippi Education." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1969. vi, 98 l.

Challenges, including modernization, consolidation, the 1957 "Sputnik" science education crisis, and desegregation, that confronted the administration of state superintendent of education Tubb, 1945 to 1967.


"Sketch of Gov. Walter Leake, of Mississippi." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 11, no. 4 (Apr. 1904): 417-19.

Brief anonymous sketch of the Virginia-born governor of Mississippi (1762-1825).


Sketch of the Catholic Church in the City of Natchez, Mississippi: On the Occasion of the Consecration of Its Cathedral, September 19, 1886. Natchez, Miss.: Natchez Democrat Printing, 1886. 51 pp.

Brief history of the Adams County congregation before 1886.


Skipwith Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc. The Heritage of Lafayette County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1986. vii, 642 pp.

Includes history of the county, the town of Oxford, the University of Mississisppi, and information on communities, churches, and schools; bulk of the volume comprised of family histories.


Skoch, George. "An Inside Story." Civil War Times Illustrated 23, no. 10 (Feb. 1985): 18-23.

Capture at Milliken's Bend in May 1863 and imprisonment in the Warren County Courthouse in Vicksburg of two New York Tribune journalists-Albert Deane Richardson (1833-69) and Junius Henri Browne (1833-1902)-who were covering the Civil War.


Slade, Peter. "Singing a New Song: The Formation of the Black Student Union Choir at the University of Mississippi." Mississippi Folklife 31, no. 1 (Fall 1998): 45-54.

Interviews former members of the African American gospel group formed in 1974.


Slay, Ronald J. The Development of the Teaching of Agriculture in Mississippi, with Special Emphasis on Agriculture as a Part of School Curricula. N.Y.: Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928. viii, 194 pp.

First four chapters deal with nineteenth-century agriculture, farmers' organizations, legislation, and agricultural experimenters (William Dunbar, Rush Nutt, and David Greenleaf).


Sledge, Broox, comp. "The Post Office History of Noxubee County (1834-1965)." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 2 (May 1983): 124-47.

Lists post offices (some of which were subsequently closed) and postmasters.


Sledge, Broox. "A Postal History of Kemper County, 1834-1964." Journal of Mississippi History 36, no. 1 (Feb. 1974): 69-75.

Lists eighty-seven post offices, their dates of establishment, and the names of the first appointed postmasters.


Sledge, James L., III. "The Chisholm Massacre: Politics and Violence in East Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 55, no. 3 (Aug. 1993): 203-15.

Post-Reconstruction political violence in DeKalb (Kemper Co.), in which three members of the Republican Chisholm family were killed in 1877 in a shootout with an angry mob seeking a scapegoat for the murder of Democrat John Gully.


Sloan, David. "The Expedition of Hernando De Soto: A Post-Mortem Report." Arkansas Historical Quarterly 51, no. 1 (Spring 1992): 1-29; 51, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 297-327.

Two-part article traces writings on the de Soto expedition, beginning with contemporary accounts and ending with a discussion of modern scholarly interpretations.


Smead, Howard. Blood Justice: The Lynching of Mack Charles Parker. Boston: Beacon Press, 1985; N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1986. xiv, 248 pp.

Account of the 1959 rape of June Walters, the lynching of Parker in Poplarville (Pearl River Co.) for the crime, and the FBI's subsequent investigation; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Lynching of Mack Charles Parker in Poplarville, Mississippi, April 25, 1959," University of Maryland, 1979.


Smiley, David L. "Cassius M. Clay and the Mississippi Election of 1875." Journal of Mississippi History 19, no. 4 (Oct. 1957): 252-62.

Clay, former emancipationist and Republican, journeyed to the South to campaign for Democratic candidates.


Smiley, David L. "William Carey Crane, Professor of Old Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 12, no. 2 (Apr. 1950): 98-104.

Crane was president of Mississippi Female Institute in Hernando (DeSoto Co.) in the 1850s before becoming president of Baylor University in 1863.


Smith, Allene DeShazo. Greenwood LeFlore and the Choctaw Indians of the Mississippi Valley. Memphis: C.A. Davis, 1951. 191 pp.

Popular biography of the last chief of the Choctaws before removal in the 1830s.


Smith, Charles P. "Governor Fielding Wright's Legislative Programs: 1946-1952." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1976. 125 l.

Accomplishments of Wright (b. 1895), who ran for vice president of the United States on the Dixiecrat ticket in 1948.


Smith, Charles Pope. "Theodore G. Bilbo's Senatorial Career: The Final Years, 1941-1947." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1983. 260 l.

Examines the sources of Bilbo's racial demagoguery and the extent to which his racial attitudes led his fellow U.S. senators to have his conduct investigated in the last year of his life, 1946-47.


Smith, Claude P. "Official Efforts by the State of Mississippi to Encourage Immigration, 1868-1886." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 4 (Nov. 1970): 327-40.

Chronicles the largely unsuccessful effort to lure European laborers to replace lost slave labor; based on the author's master's thesis, "Immigration into Mississippi During Reconstruction," Mississippi College, 1968.


Smith, Dale Edwyna. "The Slaves of Liberty: Freedom in Amite County, Mississippi, 1820-1868." Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard University, 1993. 424 l.

Uses a South Mississippi majority-slave county as a test case for historians' theories about slaveholder attitudes, the interrelationship between white freedom and black enslavement, and the effect of slavery on African American society.


Smith, Dan W., Jr. "James O. Eastland: Early Life and Career, 1904-1942." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1978. 127 l.

Childhood and young adulthood of U.S. senator Eastland (1904-86) of Sunflower County.


Smith, Dorothy Vick. "Black Reconstruction in Mississippi, 1862-1870." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Kansas, 1985. 308 l.

Changing socio-economic status of African Americans in Mississippi from emancipation to Reconstruction.


Smith, Dorothy Lorie. "A History of Lauderdale County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1961. vii, 102 l.

County history, 1833-1961, including information on early settlers, agriculture, railroads, Civil War and Reconstruction, churches, schools, and the military installation at Meridian.


Smith, Earl Jennings. "The Free, Foreign-Born Population of Mississippi in the 1850s." Ph.D. dissertation, Vanderbilt University, 1974. 387 l.

Quantitative analysis of sample counties suggests that immigrants to Mississippi mainly settled in towns, that they resembled the native-born population in many respects, and that they provoked little nativist reaction.


Smith, Frank E. "Alfred Holt Stone." Journal of Mississippi History 17, no. 4 (Oct. 1955): 289-92.

Obituary of Stone (1870-1955), who wrote about race relations, edited the Staple Cotton Review, and served as a state legislator and as head of the State Tax Commission.


Smith, Frank E. "Bell I. Wiley-Mississippian." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 3 (Aug. 1980): 252-53.

Obituary of Wiley (1906-80), Civil War historian who taught at the University of Mississippi from 1936 to 1946.


Smith, Frank E. "Dale Mullen and Modern Mississippi Literature." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 4 (Nov. 1986): 257-70.

Mullen encouraged Eudora Welty, Shelby Foote, and other young Mississippi writers when he worked on three Mississippi literary magazines from 1934 to 1941.


Smith, Frank E., and Audrey Warren. Mississippians All. New Orleans: Pelican, 1968. 86 pp.

Biographical sketches of war heroes Jake W. Lindsey (b. 1921) and Milton Olive (1946-65), writer Eudora Welty (1909-2001), soprano Leontyne Price (b. 1927), U.S. senator Blanche K. Bruce (1841-98), U.S. Supreme Court justice Lucius Q.C. Lamar (1825-93), and baseball players Jake Gibbs (b. 1938) and George Scott (b. 1944).


Smith, Frank E. The Yazoo River. N.Y.: Rinehart, 1954. Rivers of America series. xvi, 362 pp.

Undocumented history of the Yazoo Basin touches on Native Americans, religion, cotton and slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, recreation, malaria, steamboats, floods, agricultural mechanization, writer William Faulkner, and political figures Franklin W. Plummer, John Sharp Williams, and James K. Vardaman.


Smith, Hannis S. "The Futile Star of the West." Journal of Mississippi History 14, no. 1 (Jan. 1952): 63-66.

The Star of the West, which began as a merchant steamboat in 1855, was deliberately scuttled by the Confederates to block the Tallahatchie River near Fort Pemberton during the Siege of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1863.


Smith, Jack Alan. "A Study of Place-Names in Forrest County, Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, Auburn University, 1969. viii, 181 l.

Linguistic analysis of names of towns and cities, natural features, roads, and institutions.


Smith, James D., III. "Frontier Ecuminism: The Olmstead-Smith Debate of Christian Evidences (Columbus, 1841)." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 2 (May 1989): 133-39.

Debate on eighteen consecutive evenings in Columbus (Lowndes Co.) between Colonel C.G. Olmstead and Reverend James Smith, a Cumberland Presbyterian clergyman; Smith's argument was published in 1843 as The Christian's Defense.


Smith, James Patterson. "Reconstructing the Gulf Coast's Colonial Past: Progress in Recovering the History of the British West Florida Company, 1763-1783." Journal of Mississippi History 60, no. 1 (Spring 1998): 21-49.

Bibliographical essay includes brief overview of British West Florida history and suggestions for research.


Smith, Jay T., Sr. "Origin and Development of Industrial Education at Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College." Ed.D. dissertation, University of Missouri-Columbia, 1971. 176 l.

Examines reasons for the lack of support for industrial education at Alcorn A&M, which emphasized liberal arts and agricultural education in its first century (1871-1971).


Smith, Jessie Carney. Epic Lives: One Hundred Black Women Who Made a Difference. Detroit: Visible Ink, 1993. xvii, 632 pp.

Includes biographical sketches of Ida B. Wells Barnett (1862-1931) of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.), Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-77) of Montgomery County, Leontyne Price (b. 1927) of Laurel (Jones Co.), Naomi Sims (b. 1948) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.), and Oprah Winfrey (b. 1954) of Kosciusko (Attala Co.).


Smith, John David. "Alfred Holt Stone: Mississippi Planter and Archivist/Historian of Slavery." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 4 (Nov. 1983): 262-70.

Evaluates contributions of Stone (1870-1955), a Delta planter and tax administrator who wrote extensively on racial matters.


Smith, Joseph Philip. "A History of College Admissions at the University of Mississippi since 1954: Implications of Brown v. Board of Education, Meredith v. Fair, and Ayers v. Fordice upon Student Selection Criteria." Ed.D. dissertation, University of Memphis, 1998. 99 l.

Finds that current admissions standards are "racially neutral."


Smith, Mary Jane. "A Study of Race and Community in the New South: Washington County, Mississippi, 1920-1940." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1987. vii, 77 l.

Examines "racial dynamics" of the county's leadership in the interwar years, its unequal educational system, the 1927 Mississippi River flood, and self-help efforts of African Americans.


Smith, Myron J., Jr. "Gunboats in a Ditch: The Steele's Bayou Expedition, 1863." Journal of Mississippi History 37, no. 2 (May 1975): 165-88.

Relates the Confederate success in "the most romantically coloured adventure of the Vicksburg Campaign," in which Union gunboats attempted to approach the Warren County city via the Yazoo River and its tributaries.


Smith, Reid, and Johns Owens. Majesty of Natchez. Montgomery, Ala.: Paddle Wheel, 1969. [84] pp.

Descriptions and photographs of antebellum Natchez (Adams Co.) structures.


Smith, Samuel Denny. The Negro in Congress, 1870-1901. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1940. xiii, 160 pp.

Examines the careers of the twenty-two African Americans in Congress in the period, including senators Hiram R. Revels and Blanche K. Bruce and representative John R. Lynch of Mississippi.


Smith, Steven D. "Old Bay Springs Revisited." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 4 (Nov. 1986): 297-308.

Summarizes findings of a 1981 archaeological report for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; the Tishomingo County community-originally Gresham's Mills-was the site of the Bay Springs Union Factory, one of the few antebellum cotton mills in the state.


Smith, Suanna. "George Poindexter: A Political Biography." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1980. 191 l.

Discusses the turbulent political career of Poindexter (1779-1853) as judge, congressman, governor, and U.S. senator, as well as his conflict with Andrew Jackson over the Bank of the United States.


Smith, Suanna. "Washington, Mississippi: Antebellum Elysium." Journal of Mississippi History 40, no. 2 (May 1978): 143-65.

History of the Adams County community that served as the territorial capital from 1802 to 1817 and was the site of the trial of Aaron Burr before the territorial Superior Court in 1807.


Smith, Thomas H. "Ohio Quakers and the Mississippi Freedmen-'A Field to Labor.'" Ohio History 78, no. 3 (Summer 1969): 159-71.

Efforts to assist and educate former slaves, 1863-75, especially in the Jackson (Hinds Co.) freedmen's school.


Snell, Susan. Phil Stone of Oxford: A Vicarious Life. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1991. xi, 399 pp.

Biography of Philip Avery Stone (1893-1967), Oxford (Lafayette Co.) lawyer and mentor of writer William Faulkner; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Phil Stone of Yoknapatawpha," University of North Carolina, 1978.


Snyder, Charles M. "Harriet Prewett of Yazoo City and Ex-President Millard Fillmore: She Carried a Torch with a Sense of Humor." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 3 (Aug. 1977): 193-204.

Reveals Prewett's unrequited admiration for Fillmore, whom she only met twice, 1856-57.


Snyder, Robert E. "The Cotton Holiday Movement in Mississippi, 1931." Journal of Misissippi History 40, no. 1 (Feb. 1978): 1-32.

Legislative wrangling to forestall dangerously falling cotton prices following the Federal Crop Reporting Board's forecast of a large crop for 1931; legislature subsequently approved governor Theodore G. Bilbo's crop reduction plan.


Snyder, Robert E. Cotton Crisis. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984. Fred W. Morrison Series in Southern Studies. Xvii, 174 pp.

Chapter seven, "The Hearse Makes Its Rounds," includes material on the push for acreage control legislation, especially in Mississippi, and on the Jackson (Hinds Co.) Cotton Conference of 1931, which recommended that cotton-producing southern states pass acreage control laws; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Cotton Holiday Movement in the South," Syracuse University, 1980.


Sobotka, C. John, Jr. A History of Lafayette County, Mississippi. Oxford, Miss.: Rebel, 1976. 126 pp.

Covers Native Americans, early white settlement, Civil War and Reconstruction, economy, buildings, churches, schools, newspapers, and writer William Faulkner; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, University of Mississippi, 1973.


"Some Accounts of Noxubee County and Its People, 1833-1901." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 21 (Mar. 1982): 2-8.

Emphasizes early white settlers.


"Some Macon Business Firms of 1911." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 20 (Dec. 1981): 7-8.

Emphasizes retail establishments.


"Some Noxubee County Industries in the 1880s." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 14 (June 1980): 6-7.

Deals only with non-agricultural businesses.


"Some Revolutionary War Soldiers Made Noxubee County Their Last Home." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 8 (Dec. 1978): 1-2.

Very brief sketches of four early settlers.


Sorin, R.J. History of DeLisle and Its Missions. DeLisle, Miss.: n.p., 1934. 4 pp.

Booklet on the Harrison County village and its Catholic missions, 1712-1922.



Sorrels, William W. The Maroon Bulldogs: Mississippi State Football. Huntsville, Ala.: Strode, 1975. 300 pp.

History of the (Oktibbeha Co.) university's intercollegiate football program, 1895-1974.


"Soule Chapel Church and Cemetery." Noxobee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 1 (Mar. 1977): 1-4.

Brief history of the Methodist congregation, established in 1835 near Macon.


Southwick, Leslie H. "The Mississippi Court of Appeals: History, Procedures, and First Year's Jurisprudence." Mississippi Law Journal 65 (Spring 1996): 593-641.

Argues for the creation of a new court and includes a section on the history of appellate courts in the state from 1817 to 1952.


Southwood, Howard D. "Riley of Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 13, no. 4 (Oct. 1951): 193-211.

Franklin D. Riley, professor of history, University of Mississippi in Oxford (Lafayette Co.), revived the moribund Mississippi Historical Society in 1898 and established and edited its journal, Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, until 1913.


Souvenir: One Hundred Years of Methodism in Jackson, Mississippi, 1836-1936. N.p., 1936. 20 pp.

Program of the Mississippi Annual Conference of the Methodist Church includes a brief history of Galloway Memorial Church in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Spalding, Arminta Scott. "The Natchez Trace Parkway." M.A. thesis, Stephen F. Austin State College, 1965. x, 168 l.

Follows the political evolution of the parkway beginning with the establishment of the Natchez Trace Association in 1934.


[Sparkman, Linda Cunningham]. "The Episcopal Church in Noxubee County." Noxubee County Misissippi Quarterly Bulletin 24 (Dec. 1982): 2-4.

Churches in and around Macon and Brooksville, 1838-1975.


Sparks, Randy J. "Mississippi's Apostle of Slavery: James Smylie and the Biblical Defense of Slavery." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 2 (May 1989): 89-106.

Scripturally-based pro-slavery argument of the 1830s publicized in a pamphlet by Presbyterian clergyman Smylie (1740-1853) of Amite County; the argument was not, in fact, original with him, but was also found in early eighteenth-century religious writings about the importance of the patriarchal family.


Sparks, Randy J. "'The White People's Arms Are Longer Than Ours': Blacks, Educations, and the American Missionary Association in Reconstruction Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 1 (Feb. 1992): 1-27.

Emphasizes the role of freedmen in their own education.


Speck, Raymond Walter, Jr. "The Mississippi Supreme Court: Its Organization and Work." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1958. v, 165 l.

Includes brief history of the court and a list of justices, 1817-1958.


Speed, Lionel Oscar. "The 1947 Strike on Southern Bus Lines." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1949. iv, 92 l.

The "Mid-South's most violent labor upheaval," which led directly to the establishment of the Mississippi Bureau of Investigation.


Speer, Lisa Kay. "Images of Mississippi in Popular Magazines, 1930-1989." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1991. v, 210 l.

Examines the extent to which popular news and photo magazines (including two African American periodicals, Jet and Ebony) have shaped the state's largely negative national image over two generations.


Spell, Mary Alfreda. "The Early Life of Edgar L. Misterfeldt, 1912-1920." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1970. vi, 71 l.

Young adulthood of Misterfeldt (1876-1949), third generation German-American, Mississippian, and grandfather of the author.


Spell, Suzanne. "A History of Jones County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1961. 105 l.

County history from 1826, including information on settlers, county government, Civil War and Reconstruction, industry (Masonite Corp.), lawyers, religion, education, newspapers, and writers (James Street).


Spence, Mac, and Louise Spence, comps. The History of Leake County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1984. 359 pp.

Brief histories of churches, communities, schools, and especially, families.


Spencer, Dennis. "Boys' State: A Program for Mississippi Youth, 1939-." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 2 (May 1968): 111-22.

Origin of the American Legion-sponsored program for training boys in the principles of democracy.


Spencer, Robert F., and Jesse D. Jennings, et al. The Native Americans. N.Y.: Harper and Row, 1965. xi, 539 pp.

Includes entry on the Natchez tribe by anthropologist Theodore Stern.


Spivak, John M. "Richard Taylor Rives and Benjamin F. Cameron: The Varieties of Southern Judges." Southern Studies 1 (new series), no. 3 (Fall 1990): 225-41.

Assessment, based largely on personal interviews, of the reactions to Brown v. Board of Education (1954) by two Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals judges from Alabama and Mississippi.


Spofford, Tim. Lynch Street: The May 1970 Slayings at Jackson State College. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1988. 219 pp.

Narrative of the incident in which two college students were killed and thirteen wounded by Mississippi Highway Patrol and Jackson (Hinds Co.) police officers during a protest over the U.S. invasion of Cambodia; based on the author's D.A. dissertation, "Lynch Street: The Story of Mississippi's Kent State-The May 1970 Slayings at Jackson State College," State University of New York at Albany, 1984.


Spoto, Donald. The Kindness of Strangers: The Life of Tennessee Williams. Boston: Little, Brown, 1985. xix, 409 l.

Biography of the playwright Thomas Lanier Williams (1911-83), who was born in Columbus (Lowndes Co.) and grew up in Clarksdale (Coahoma Co.) and St. Louis, Missouri.


Spruill, Larry Hawthorne. "Southern Exposure: Photography and the Civil Rights Movement, 1955-1968." Ph.D. dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1983. 379 l.

Work of photojournalists in support of (and, to a lesser extent, in opposition to) aims of the civil rights movement; includes discussion of work in Mississippi.


Srinivasan, Gautam. "Mississippi Learning: An Analysis of the Education Reform Act and Better Education for Success Tomorrow." Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 4 (Winter !996): 359-76.

Contrasts governor William Winter's success in winning passage of the 1982 Education Reform Act with his successor Ray Mabus's failure to enact his own education initiative in 1987.


St. Clair, Sadie Daniel. "The National Career of Blanche Kelso Bruce." Ph.D. dissertation, New York University, 1947. 326 l.

Evaluates the career of Bruce (1841-98), one of only two African American U.S. senators from Mississippi, and discusses issues of race in Reconstruction politics and the role of African Americans in the Republican Party of the late nineteenth century.


St. Jean, Wendy. "Chickasaws: Firm Friends of the English?" Journal of Mississippi History 58, no. 4 (Winter 1996): 345-58.

Intra-tribal factionalism in the eighteenth century.


St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Woodville, Mississippi, October 4, 1823-October 4, 1923. Woodville, Miss.: Woodville Republican Printing, [1923]. 17 pp.

Program of the centennial of the Wilkinson County church contains only a very brief history.


St. Pe', Jerry. A Salute to American Spirit: The Story of Ingalls Shipbuilding, Division of Litton. N.Y.: Newcomen Society of the U.S., 1988. 23 pp.

Undocumented essay on the history of the Pascagoula (Jackson Co.) corporation, 1938-88.


Stamper, Anita Miller, and Mary Edna Lohrenz. "Manuscript Sources for 'Mississippi Homespun: Nineteenth-Century Textiles and the Women Who Made Them.'" Journal of Mississippi History 53, no. 3 (Aug. 1991): 185-217.

Demonstrates how diverse print sources can help to interpret artifacts.


Stamper, Anita Miller, and Mary Edna Lohrenz. Mississippi Homespun: Nineteenth-Century Textiles and the Women Who Made Them. Jackson: Mississippi Dept. of Archives and History, 1989. 79 pp.

Exhibition catalog includes biographical sketches of fifteen nineteenth-century Mississippi women (one a slave) and descriptions of the quilts, coverlets, linens, and clothing they made; includes essay on textile production from cotton growing to yarn production, weaving, sewing, needlework, and mending.


Stampley, Herbert Glenn. "The Academy Movement in Mississippi During the Nineteenth Century." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1950. v, 143 l.

Establishment of private secondary schools, 1800-1900, in the absence of many public, or common, schools in the state.


Stanchak, John E. "Beauvoir, Where the Leader of a Lost Revolution and Some of His Troops Waited Out Their Days." Civil War Times Illustrated 30, no. 3 (July/Aug. 1991): 22-25.

Describes the 1879 gift of the Harrison County home of Mrs. Sarah Anne Ellis Dorsey to Jefferson and Varina Davis.


Stanchak, John E. "A Mississippi Home Stands, a Silent Witness to Battle." Civil War Times Illustrated 30, no. 2 (May/June 1991): 18-21, 60-61.

History-including vandalism during the Civil War-of the Coker House, located at the edge of the Champion Hill Battlefield (Warren Co.).


Stanley, C.M. "Aristocratic Hot-Heads in Mobile Duel." Alabama Historical Quarterly 17, no. 3 (Fall 1955): 105-109.

Henry Vick of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) was killed shortly before his wedding by Lawrence Washington Stith on May 7, 1859; although dueling was illegal in both Mississippi and Alabama, Mobile was selected as a site supposedly safer from law enforcement interference.


Stanley, David E., with Frank Coffey. The Elvis Encyclopedia: The Complete and Definitive Reference Book on the King of Rock 'n' Roll. Santa Monica, Cal.: General, 1994. 287 pp.

Includes chronology biographical sketches, lists of records and movies, and trivia; not organized alphabetically.


Stanton, Elizabeth Brandon. Sidelights on the Picturesque and Romantic History of Ye Old Natchez Trace of the Mysterious Natchez. Adams County, Miss.: the author, 1934. 24 pp.

Undocumented vignettes of the history of the old Indian trail and highway before it was surfaced and made part of the national parks system in the 1930s.


Stark, Genevieve Lois Maxon. "Traces of Early Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1969. 99 l.

History of the Natchez Trace, Gaines Trace, the Robinson Road, and the Jackson Military Road.


Starr, J. Barton. "'The Spirit of What Is There Called Liberty': The Stamp Act in British West Florida." Alabama Review 29, no. 4 (Oct. 1976): 261-72.

Opposition to the 1765 Stamp Act by residents of British West Florida, which included the Natchez District.


Starr, J. Barton. Tories, Dons, and Rebels: The American Revolution in West Florida. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1976. 278 pp.

Diplomatic history of the British colony includes a chapter on the 1778 Willing Raid on the Mississippi River.


The State of Mississippi Historic Properties: State-Owned Buildings of Historical and Architectural Significance. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 1982. [11], 23 pp., [iii].

Photographs and brief descriptions of thirty-six structures; forty-eight more listed by name and architectural style only.


Steel, Edward M., Jr. "A Pioneer Farmer in the Choctaw Purchase." Journal of Mississippi History 16, no. 4 (Oct. 1954): 229-41.

Based on the 1838-46 diary of North Carolina-born farmer Ferdinand Steel, who settled in Carroll County.


Steely, Frank; and H. Lew Wallace. "Thomas D. Clark: A Biographical Sketch." Filson Club Historical Quarterly 60, no. 3 (July 1986): 293-318.

University of Kentucky historian Clark (b. 1903) was born and reared in Mississippi.


Steffen, Therese. "Eudora Welty's Swiss Ancestry." Notes on Mississippi Writers 25, no. 1 (Jan. 1993): 19-36.

Genealogy of the Jackson (Hinds Co.) writer (1909-2001).


Steiner, Christian. Opera People. N.Y.: Vendome; London: Weidnefeld and Nicolson, 1982. 112 pp.

Includes biographical sketch of soprano Leontyne Price (b. 1927) of Laurel (Jones Co.).


Stennis, Hardy R. "The Stennis Law Office." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 31 (Sept. 1984): 2.

Describes three attorneys' offices located in 1838 across the street from the county courthouse in Macon.


Stephenson, C.C., Jr. "The Freedmen's Bureau in Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1939. iv, 304 l.

Detailed account of the bureau's actions, responsibilities, and officers, 1863-72.


Stephenson, N.W. "A Theory of Jefferson Davis." American Historical Review 21, no. 1 (Oct. 1915): 73-90.

Attributes Davis's rigidity and self-delusion while president of the Confederate States of America to his rootless and financially insecure childhood.


Stephenson, Wendell H. "A Half Century of Southern Historical Scholarship." Journal of Southern History 11, no. 1 (Feb. 1945): 3-32.

Two generations of southern historians prior to the 1934 founding of the Southern Historical Association; includes Franklin L. Riley , who was professor of history at the University of Mississippi in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.


Stephenson, Wendell H. "Herbert B. Adams and Southern Historical Scholarship at the Johns Hopkins University." Maryland Historical Magazine 42, no. 1 (Mar. 1947): 1-20.

Includes mention of Adams's Ph.D. student Franklin L. Riley, who taught one of the first courses in southern history at the University of Mississippi, reconstituted the state historical society, and inaugurated the first state history journal in 1897.


Stephenson, Wendell Holmes. "A Quarter-Century of a Mississippi Plantation: Eli J. Capell of 'Pleasant Hill.'" Mississippi Valley Historical Review 23, no 3 (Dec. 1936): 355-74.

Analyzes extensive plantation diaries of Capell of Amite County, 1842-67.


Stevens, Katharine Bell. "Theatrical Entertainment in Jackson, Mississippi, 1890-1910." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1951. iv, 367 l.

Productions at Robinson's Opera House, Knight Opera House, Livingston Park, and the Century Theatre in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Stietenroth, Charles. One Hundred Years with "Old Trinity" Church, Natchez, Miss. Natchez, Miss.: Natchez Printing and Stationery, 1922. 77 pp.

Institutional history of Trinity Episcopal Church (Adams Co.) contains many images of former rectors and bishops.


Still, Judith Anne, Michael J. Dabrishus, and Carolyn L. Quin. William Grant Still: A Bio-Bilbliography. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1996. xii, 331 pp.

Includes bibliographical sketch of the African American composer (1895-1978), who was born in Woodville (Wilkinson Co.).


Still, William N., Jr. "Confederate Shipbuilding in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 4 (Nov. 1968): 291-303.

Brief life of the ironclad yard at Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.), 1862-63, where work was performed on the Arkansas and the Mobile before the yard had to be dismantled in advance of Union troops in the spring of 1863.


Still, William N., Jr. "Facilities for the Construction of War Vessels in the Confederacy." Journal of Southern History 31, no. 3 (Aug. 1965): 285-304.

Mentions Yazoo City (Yazoo Co.), which was briefly the site of ironclad construction during the Civil War.


Still, William N. Iron Afloat: The Story of the Confederate Armorclads. Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt University Press, 1971. x, 260 pp.

Includes chapter on the loss of the C.S.S. Arkansas following battles on the Yazoo River near Vicksburg (Warren Co.) in 1862; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Construction and Fitting Out of Ironclad Vessels-of-War within the Confederacy," University of Alavama, 1964; see also his master's thesis, "A History of the C.S.S. Arkansas," University of Alabama, 1958.


Stine, Jeffrey K. Mixing the Waters: Environment, Politics, and the Building of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. Akron, Ohio: University of Akron Press, 1993. ix, 336 pp.

Political wrangling (especially over cost benefits and environmental impact) surrounding the construction of the man-made canal connecting Mobile, Alabama, with the Tennessee River; although the project was first discussed in the nineteenth century, the book concentrates on the years 1946-85, spanning congressional authorization and the opening of the waterway.


Stinson, Byron. "Hot Work in Mississippi: The Battle of Tupelo." Civil War Times Illustrated 11, no. 4 (July 1972): 46-48.

Troop placement, battle lines, Union use of African American troops, and heavy Confederate losses in the 1864 Lee County battle.


Stokes, Beatrice Marion. "John Bisland, Mississippi Planter, 1776-1821." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University Press, 1941. viii, 148 l.

Plantation life at Mount Airwell in the Natchez District, based largely on diaries and account books; also includes limited biographical and family information on Bisland (1742-1821).


Stokes, Rebecca Martin. "History of Grenada (1830-1880)." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1929. 216 [iii] l.

History of the county covers founding, towns, schools, churches, newspapers, and railroads, Civil War and Reconstruction, and the yellow fever epidemic of 1878.


Stone, Alfred H. "The Early Slave Laws of Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 2 (1899): 133-45.

Defends the justice and humanity of laws respecting slavery, 1817-31.


Stone, Alfred Holt. "Mississippi's Constitution and Statutes in Reference to Freedmen, and Their Alleged Relation to the Reconstruction Acts and War Amendments." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 4 (1901): 143-226.

Defends Mississippi's Black Code of 1865, comparing it favorably to laws respecting freedmen in other countries, and decries universal manhood suffrage; refers extensively to Rep. James G. Blaine's role in bringing the severe terms of congressional Reconstruction to bear on Mississippi.


Stone, Alfred H. "The President's Program: Civil Rights, States' Rights, and the Reconstruction Background." Journal of Mississippi History 10, no. 3 (July 1948): 181-239.

Polemic against Truman's civil rights initiatives portrays the southern state of mind in 1948; originally published in the April 1948 issue of the Staple Cotton Review.


Stone, James H. Cotton Gin Port, Mississippi: The History of a Tombigbee River Town. University, Miss.: Published for the Tombigbee River Valley Management District, Tupelo, Mississippi, by the University of Mississippi, 1969. 29 pp.

Brief history of the Monroe County ghost town.


Stone, James H. "The Economic Development of Holly Springs during the 1840s." Journal of Mississippi History 32, no. 4 (Nov. 1970): 341-61.

Based on local newspapers and census data, follows the Marshall County town from settlement through depression in the late 1830s to great prosperity as the center of a very productive cotton-growing area, 1840s-50s.


Stone, James H. "The Emergence of the Populist Party in Mississippi in the 1892 Elections." Northeast Mississippi Historical Journal 3, no. 1 (Dec. 1969): 16-29.

Describes the rise of the Populists under the leadership of Frank Burkitt and J.H. Jamison; before the Democratic Party made a strong anti-black appeal to the white electorate, the Populist Party made a serious bid for power in the state.


Stone, James H. "General Absalom Madden West and the Civil War in Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 2 (May 1980): 135-44.

Letters, 1861-65, from West to other Confederate officers about the war; much of the article consists of biographical information about West (b. 1818).


Stone, James H. "A Note on Voter Registration under the Mississippi Understanding Clause, 1892." Journal of Southern History 38, no. 2 (May 1972): 293-96.

Despite the clause's purpose to disfranchise African Americans, 11.86 % of the state's black electorate registered under the clause.


Stone, James H. "Surveying the Gaines Trace, 1807-1808." Alabama Historical Quarterly 33, no. 2 (Summer 1971): 135-52.

Most of the article reproduces George Strother Gaines's survey, but a brief introduction reviews the history of the wagon road connecting the Tennessee River at Muscle Shoals, Alabama, to the Tombigbee River at Cotton Gin Port (Monroe Co.), Mississippi.


Stotik, Jeffrey Phillip. "Incorporation and Resistance: The Native Southeast and the World-Economy, 1670s-1830s." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Tennessee, 1994. 235 l.

Sociological study argues that the Southeastern Indian tribes became incorporated in the international economy before their removal to Indian Territory as they participated in trade, were affected by a growing white settler population, owned private property, and experienced class divisions.


Stovall, Mary E. "'To Be, To Do, and To Suffer': Responses to Illness and Death in the Nineteenth-Century Central South." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 2 (May 1990): 95-109.

Overview of poor health conditions in Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee; includes many individual examples drawn from manuscript research.


Stover, John F. "Colonel Henry S. McComb, Mississippi Railroad Adventurer." Journal of Mississippi History 17, no. 3 (July 1955): 177-90.

Argues that McComb's inept management in the 1870s led directly to northern control of most of Mississippi's rail lines.


Stover, John F. History of the Illinois Central Railroad. N.Y.: Macmillan; London: Collier Macmillan, 1975. Railroads of America series. xiv, 575 pp.

Chapter eight, "South of Cairo to New Orleans," includes discussion of the building of the Mississippi Central Railroad, its takeover during Reconstruction by Henry S. McComb, and the absorption of the line into the Illinois Central system in 1877.


Stover, John F. The Railroads of the South, 1865-1900: A Study in Control. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1955. xviii, 310 pp.

Chapter eight, "The Illinois Central Comes South," primarily concerns Mississippi, especially Henry S. McComb and the Mississippi Central Railroad; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Development of Northern Financial Control Over Southern Railroads, 1865 to 1900," University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1951.


Stover, John F. "Southern Ambitions of the Illinois Central Railroad." Journal of Southern History 20, no. 4 (Nov. 1954): 499-510.

Efforts to extend the line from Chicago to the Gulf of Mexico; includes discussion of Henry S. McComb and his Mississippi Central Railroad, which in 1876 fell into receivership and control by the Illinois Central Railroad.


Street, Ellen McKinstry. Highlights in the History of the First Baptist Church, Ripley, Mississippi, 1838-1968. Ripley, Miss.: n.p., [1968?]. 52 pp.

Institutional history of the Tippah County church.


Street, Robin Belinda. "A Case Study in Crisis Public Relations: The Meredith Crisis at the University of Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1985. vi, 150 l.

Bulk of the thesis describes media coverage of the riot preceding James Meredith's enrollment as the university's first known African American student; also quotes from articles in a wide variety of newspapers and magazines in the year following the controversy of September 1962.


Strode, Hudson. Jefferson Davis. N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace, 1955-64. 3 vols.

Sympathetic biography includes volume one, American Patriot, 1808-1869 (1955); volume two, Confederate President (1959); and volume three, Tragic Hero: The Last Twenty-Five Years, 1864-1889 (1964).


Sturdivant, Laura D.S. "MSMA: You're Ten Years Older than You Think." Journal of the Mississippi State Medical Association 17, no. 11 (Nov. 1976): 330-32.

Founding of the association in 1846.


Sufrin, Mark. Payton. N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1988. 151 pp.

Biography of football great Walter Jerry Payton (1954-99) of Columbia (Marion Co.).


Sugg, Allene. "The Senatorial Career of George Poindexter, 1830-1835." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1950. vi, 137 l.

Conflict between U.S. senator Poindexter (1799-1853) and president Andrew Jackson over patronage, nullification, and banking.


Suggs, Henry Lewis, ed. The Black Press in the South, 1865-1979. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1983. xi, 468 pp.

Chapter six, "Mississippi," by Julius Eric Thompson covers African American newspapers, editors, editorial policies, and issues of concern to readers.


Sullivan, Charles L. Hurricanes of the Mississippi Gulf Coast, 1717 to Present. [Biloxi, Miss.]: Gulf, [1986]. vi, 139 pp.

Heavily illustrated chronicle.


Sullivan, Charles L. The Mississippi Gulf Coast: Portrait of a People, an Illustrated History. Northridge, Cal.: Windsor, 1985. 200 pp.

Heavily illustrated popular history.


Sullivan, Chester. Sullivan's Hollow. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1978. vii, 93 pp.

Examines the truth behind the legend of the lawless Sullivan family of Smith County, whose "violent period" lasted for over fifty years after the Civil War.


Sullivan, Cynthia Ann Meade. "An Analysis of Letters of the Secretary of War as Sources for the Writing of Mississippi History, 1800-1814." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1987. ii, 182 l.

Rarely-cited primary sources housed in the Mississippi Department of Archives and History in Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Sullivan, Jo M. "Mississippi in Africa: Settlers Among the Kru, 1835-1847." Liberian Studies Journal 8, no. 2 (1978-79): 79-94.

Thirty-seven free blacks sent by the Mississippi Colonization Society to the Kru Coast of Liberia in 1838.


Sumerlin, Alvin. "Theodore Bilbo: The Last Phase." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1950. 107 l.

Emphasizes Bilbo's last senatorial campaign in 1946 and the U.S. Senate investigations of him.


Sumners, Cecil L. Chief Tishomingo: A History of the Chickasaw Indians, and Some Historical Events of Their Era (1737-1839). Amory, Miss.: Amory Advertiser, 1974. vi, 163 pp.

Anecdotal history of the life and times of Tishomingo (c.1734-c.1838).


Sumners, Cecil L. The Governors of Mississippi. Gretna, La.: Pelican, 1980. xii, 164 pp.

Biographical sketches of every governor, beginning with D'Iberville in the French colonial period and ending with William Winter, who left the governor's mansion in 1984; includes sixty portraits.


Sumners, Cecil Lamar. "The Trial of Chief Tishomingo, the Last Great War Chief of the Chickasaw Indians." Journal of Monroe County History 3 (1977): 28-39.

Trial of Tishomingo for criminal trespass in 1832.


Sumners, Mary Floyd. "Tishomingo County, 1836-1860." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1957. v. 154 l.

Antebellum history of "old" Tishomingo County (present-day Tishomingo, Alcorn, and Prentiss counties).


Sumners, Mary Floyd. "Edgar Stewart Wilson: The Mississippi Eagle, Journalist of the New South." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1962. v, 245 pp.

Biography of Wilson (1858-1935), influential journalist (Hinds County Gazette and several large out-of-state papers) and promoter of governors Andrew H. Longino and Martin S. Conner.


Sumners, Mary F. "Education in Ante-Bellum Tishomingo County." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 4 (Oct. 1958): 224-33.

Academies and early common schools in the present-day counties of Tishomingo, Alcorn, and Prentiss.


Sumners, Mary Floyd. "Politics in Tishomingo County, 1836-1860." Journal of Mississippi History 28, no. 2 (May 1966): 133-51.

Elections, political conventions, and political opinion on state and national issues of the day, as reflected in local newspapers.


Sumrall, Robbie Neal. A Light on a Hill: A History of Blue Mountain College. Nashville, Tenn.: Benson Printing, 1947. 172 pp.

History, 1873-1940s, of the women's college in Tippah County and a family history of the college's founder, Mark Perrin Lowrey (1828-85), many of whose descendants taught at the college.


Sunderland, Glenn W. "The Battle of Corinth." Civil War Times Illustrated 6, no. 1 (Apr. 1967): 28-37.

Describes the background and troop movements of the Alcorn County battle of October 1862, a costly but important Union victory that helped pave the way for the victory at Vicksburg (Warren Co.) the following year; article pays particular attention to the two commanders, Union general William Rosecrans and Confederate general Earl Van Dorn.


Sutherland, Daniel E. "Former Confederates in the Post-Civil War North: An Unexplored Aspect of Reconstruction History." Journal of Southern History 47, no. 3 (Aug. 1981): 393-410.

Examines the motives and activities of Southerners who moved north after the war; of 198 emigrants studied, seven were Mississippians, including writer Katherine Sherwood Bonner of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.).


Sutton, Cantey Venable, comp. and ed. History of Art in Mississippi. Gulfport, Miss.: Dixie, 1929. xv, 177 pp.

Catalogs historic structures, paintings, statuary, folk art, and crafts; also lists resident artists and assesses art education in the state.


Swager, Ronald J., and Timothy A. Venable. "Economic Growth and Change in Inequality in Mississippi, 1950-1980." Southeastern Geographer 25, no. 2 (Nov. 1985): 137-49.

Studies the unequal economic development of the state's counties.


Swain, Martha H. Ellen S. Woodward: New Deal Advocate for Women. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1995. xviii, 275 pp.

Biography of Ellen Bailey Sullivan Woodward (1887-1971) of Oxford (Lafayette Co.) and Louisville (Winston Co.), daughter of U.S. senator William Van Amberg Sullivan; focuses on her work with the Works Progress Administration, 1933-38, and the Social Security Board, 1938-46.


Swain, Martha H. "The Lion and the Fox: The Relationship of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Senator Pat Harrison." Journal of Mississippi History 38, no. 4 (Nov. 1976): 333-59.

Argues that the Depression-era political relationship faltered because of personality differences as well as Harrison's increasing reservations about New Deal legislation.


Swain, Martha. "The Mississippi Delta Goes to War, 1941-1942." Journal of Mississippi History 57, no. 4 (Winter 1995): 335-52.

Based largely on local newspaper accounts, examines mobilization, the home front, race relations, labor, and agriculture.


Swain, Martha. "A New Deal for Mississippi Women, 1933-1943." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 3 (Aug. 1984): 191-212.

Role of Ethel Payne, director of women's work for the New Deal in Mississippi, and others in the development of relief programs that affected social work, education, libraries, and the arts; examines problems with WPA regulations, funding, and racial inequities.


Swain, Martha H. "Organized Women in Mississippi: The Clash Over Legal Disabilities in the 1920s." Southern Studies 23, no. 1 (Spring 1984): 91-102.

Conflict between the small Woman's Party and the more powerful League of Women Voters over a state equal rights bill which would have given women legal rights not already guaranteed to them by the state.


Swain, Martha H. Pat Harrison: The New Deal Years. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1978. ix, 316 pp.

Political biography of U.S. senator Byron Patton Harrison (1881-1941) of Copiah County concentrates on the period of Harrison's greatest power, when he was chairman of the Senate Committee on Finance and president pro tem of the Senate; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Pat Harrison and the New Deal," Vanderbilt University, 1975, and her master's thesis, "The Senate Career of Pat Harrison of Mississippi, 1919-1929," Vanderbilt University, 1954.


Swain, Martha H. "Politics and Public Affairs: Twentieth Century Mississippi Women Activists." Journal of Mississippi History 53, no. 3 (Aug. 1991): 175-83.

Research conducted by the author on Ellen Sullivan Woodward in the Mississippi Department of Archives and History led to suggestions for research on other activists.


Swanton, John R. Final Report of the United States De Soto Expedition Commission. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1985. Smithsonian Classics of Anthropology. lxxii, 400 pp.

Originally issued in 1939 as U.S. House of Representatives Document no. 71, 76th Congress, 1st Session; archaeologist Jeffrey P. Brain has characterized the original as "the foremost landmark in De Soto studies;" his own introduction to the 1985 reprint describes and evaluates subsequent (primarily archaeological) research.


Swanton, John R. Indian Tribes of the Lower Mississippi Valley and Adjacent Coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1911. Bulletin no. 43. 387 pp.

Includes information on the lesser Mississippi tribes, including the Natchez, Yazoo, Tunica, Pascagoula, Biloxi, Taposa, Chakchiuma, Ibitoupa, Ofo, Koroa, Taensa, Grigra, and Tioux.


Swanton, John R. The Indians of the Southeastern United States. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1946. Bulletin no. 137. 2 vols.

Reference work includes a brief description of all of the major and many of the minor Indian tribes of Mississippi.


Swearingen, Mack B. The Early Life of George Poindexter: A Story of the First Southwest. New Orleans, La.: Tulane University Press, 1934. 194 pp.

Biography of Poindexter (1779-1853), attorney general of the Mississippi Territory, congressional delegate, judge, and delegate to the 1817 constitutional convention; book does not cover his later split with Andrew Jackson, his governorship of Mississippi, his brief term as U.S. senator, or his growing identification with planter interests in the antebellum period.


Swearingen, Mack. "Thirty Years of a Mississippi Plantation: Charles Whitmore of Montpelier." Journal of Southern History 1 (Apr. 1935): 198-211.

Demonstrates the efficiency of an Adams County plantation through analysis of Whitmore's 1834-64 plantation journal; article was reprinted in Plantation, Town, and County: Essays on the Local History of American Slave Society, edited by Elinor Miller and Eugene D. Genovese (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1974).


Swinney, Everett. "Suppressing Ku Klux Klan: The Enforcement of the Reconstruction Amendments, 1870-1874." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1966. 370 l.

Includes treatment of efforts to compel implementation of the Enforcement Acts of 1870-71 in Mississippi; argues that before the partial repeal of the acts at the turn of the century, they worked fairly well to limit Klan violence.


Swinny, Lee Dabney. Natchez: The City in History. Natchez, Miss.: Avava, 1989. 123 pp.

Tour guide includes brief history of the Adams County city and information about houses and other historic structures.


Switzer, John Pete. "Handsboro: A South Mississippi Town." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1985. iii, 122 l.

History of a Harrison County railroad town that lost its separate identity when it became part of the city of Gulfport in 1966.


Sydnor, Charles S. "The Beginning of Printing in Mississippi." Journal of Southern History 1 (Feb. 1935): 49-55.

Discussion of the history of printing in Mississippi with emphasis on Andrew Marschalk, the printer of the laws of the Mississippi Territory in 1799.


Sydnor, Charles S. "The Free Negro in Mississippi Before the Civil War." American Historical Review 32, no. 4 (1927): 769-88.

Concentrates on laws respecting status, employment, movement, and property rights, but also cites cases of specific free blacks largely drawn from court documents.


Sydnor, Charles S. A Gentleman of the Old Natchez Region: Benjamin L.C. Wailes. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1938. xii, 337.

Biography, based largely in his voluminous diaries, of Benjamin Leonard Covington Wailes (1797-1862), planter, amateur naturalist and historian, and advocate of agricultural improvement; maintains that Wailes's significance lies in the extensive personal record he left and in the almost perfect coincidence of his life with that of the Old South.


Sydnor, Charles S. "Historical Activity in Mississippi in the Nineteenth Century." Journal of Southern History 3, no. 2 (May 1937): 139-60.

Activities, including acquisitions of primary source materials, of three Mississippi historians of the period: Dr. John Monette, Benjamin L.C. Wailes, and J.F.H. Claiborne.


Sydnor, Charles S. "Life Span of Mississippi Slaves." American Historical Review 35, no. 3 (Apr. 1930): 566-74.

Estimates that the life expectancy of slaves in 1850 was only a little shorter than that of whites and that there was a greater life span differential between the races in the Mississippi of 1925.


Sydnor, Charles S., and Claude Bennett. Mississippi History. N.Y.: Rand McNally, 1930. xi, 370 pp.

Sixth- and seventh-grade school textbook.


Sydnor, Charles Sackett. Slavery in Mississippi. N.Y.: D. Appleton-Century, 1933. xiii, 270 pp.

Classic but dated study of the daily lives of slaves concludes that "being a slave was not for the average Negro a dreadful lot."


Sykes, James Lundy. A History of St. John's Parish, Aberdeen, Mississippi. N.p., n.d.

Brief history of the Monroe County church, 1839-1910s.


Tabarlet, Joseph O. "Ross Barnett and Desegregation in Mississippi: A Situational Analysis of Selected Speeches." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1987. v. 92 l.

Argues that Barnett's rhetoric as governor in the early 1960s was the "purest example of the advocacy of states' rights and white supremacy."


"T.A.S. Adams-Poet, Educator and Pulpit Orator." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 13 (Mar. 1980): 3-5.

Biographical sketch of Methodist clergyman Thomas Albert Smith Adams (1839-88).


Tate, Allen. Jefferson Davis, His Rise and Fall: A Biographical Narrative. N.Y.: Minton, Balch, 1929. 311 pp.

Synthetic biography draws especially on earlier biographies by William E. Dodd and H.J. Eckenrode.


Tate, Roger D., Jr. "Easing the Burden: The Era of Depression and New Deal in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Tennessee, 1978. 230 l.

Significant changes wrought by the New Deal on the state's tax, poor relief, and unemployment systems and on the character of some political leaders of the next generation.


Tate, Roger D., Jr. "Franklin L. Riley and the University of Mississippi (1897-1914)." Journal of Mississippi History 42, no. 2 (May 1980): 99-111.

Reviews the career of historian Riley (d. 1929), including the political conflict that led to his resignation from the University of Mississippi and his relocation to Washington and Lee College; based on the author's master's thesis, "Franklin L. Riley: His Career to 1914," University of Mississippi, 1971.


Tate, Roger D., Jr. "George B. Power and New Deal Work Relief in Mississippi, 1933-1934." Journal of Mississippi History 46, no. 1 (Feb. 1984): 1-16.

Evaluates Power's effectiveness as director of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, director of the State Board of Public Welfare, and as an administrator of the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Civil Works Administration.


Tate County Mississippi Genealogical and Historical Society. The Heritage of Tate County. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1991. xv, 805 pp.

Covers early history, communities, churches, schools, organizations, wars, and businesses; bulk of the volume comprised of family histories.


Taylor, A. Elizabeth. "The Woman Suffrage Movement in Mississippi, 1890-1920." Journal of Mississippi History 30, no. 1 (Feb. 1968): 1-34.

Suffragist activities in the state from the constitutional convention of 1890 to the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment; includes information on legislative proposals.


Taylor, Arville. "Horse Racing in the Lower Mississippi Valley to 1860." M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1953. 151 l.

Covers Louisiana and Mississippi.


Taylor, Kerry. "Dangerous Memories: The Legacy of the Providence Cooperative Farm." Mississippi Folklife 31, no. 1 (Fall 1998): 5-11.

Recollections of Providence, a biracial cooperative farm in Holmes County, 1938-56.


Taylor, Walter Nesbit, and George H. Ethridge. Mississippi, a History: A Narrative Historical Edition Preserving the Record of the Growth and Development of the State Together with Genealogical and Memorial Record of Its Prominent Families and Personages. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1939. 4 vols.

First volume and part of second volume contains undocumented state history; balance of the four volumes consists of over eight hundred contemporary biographical sketches along with family histories.


Taylor, William Banks. Brokered Justice: Race, Politics, and Mississippi Prisons, 1798-1992. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1993. xvii, 301 pp.

Examines the political history of the state's penal system, which, the author contends, long focused on controlling the state's large African American population; concludes that reforms inspired by federal intervention have wrought some beneficial changes but have also created many additional problems.


Taylor, William Banks. King Cotton and Old Glory: Natchez, Mississippi, in the Age of Sectional Controversy and Civil War. Hattiesburg, Miss.: Fox Printing, 1977. 82 pp.

Unionist sentiment in Natchez (Adams Co.).


Terry, Raymond, III. "The Socio-Economic Recruitment of Mississippi Political Elites: 1890-1972." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1973. 73 l.

Examines race, gender, birthplace, religion, and party affiliation of state officeholders.


"Then Comes the Horseless Carriage." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 35 (Sept. 1985): 7.

County's early automobiles and ordinances regulating them, 1908-13.


Thienel, Phillip M. Seven Story Mountain: The Union Campaign at Vicksburg. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 1995. xv, 259 pp.

Emphasis on the approach of Grant's army from across the Mississippi River in Louisiana.


Thigpen, S.G. Pearl River: Highway to Glory Land. N.p.: the author, 1965. xii, 185 pp.

Series of undocumented vignettes on the history of Hancock and Pearl River counties and several of their communities, including Gainesville, Pearlington, Logtown, and Picayune.


Thomas, Jennie Vanetta Carter. "How Three Governors Involved the Public in Passing Their Education Reform Programs." Ed.D. dissertation, George Peabody College for Teachers of Vanderbilt University, 1992. 160 l.

Strategies of governors William Winter of Mississippi, Bill Clinton of Arkansas, and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee in the early 1980s.


Thomas, Phyllis H. "The Role of Mississippi in the Presidential Election of 1916." Southern Quarterly 4, no. 2 (Jan. 1966): 207-26.

Mississippi-related factors in the race, including U.S. senator James K. Vardaman's hostility toward incumbent Woodrow Wilson, the role of Mississippi delegates at the Democratic National Convention, Wilson's friendship with senator John Sharp Williams, and the nomination of Port Gibson (Claiborne Co.) native John Parker for vice president on the Progressive ticket.


Thompson, Cleopatra D. The History of the Mississippi Teachers Association. Jackson, Miss.: Mississippi Teachers Association, 1973. xiv, 184 pp.

History of the African American teacher organization, 1893-1973; includes brief biographical sketches of organization presidents and other leaders.


Thompson, E. Bruce. "Reformers in the Penal System of Mississippi, 1820-1850." Journal of Mississippi History 7, no. 2 (Apr. 1945): 51-74.

Reforms included revamping the criminal code, elimination of debtor imprisonment, and establishment of a penitentiary.


Thompson, E. Bruce. "Richard Abbey and the Methodist Publishing House." Journal of Mississippi History 6, no. 3 (July 1944): 145-60.

Abbey, a Yazoo County planter, fought a controversial sixteen-year battle to save the Nashville publishing house from destruction by Union troops during the Civil War and then to collect reparations from the federal government for damages.


Thompson, James West. Beauvoir: The Last Home of Jefferson Davis. Bowling Green, Ky.: Rivendell, 1984. [47] pp.

Heavily-illustrated tourist booklet includes history of the Biloxi (Harrison Co.) house and of the Davis family.


Thompson, James W. "Jefferson Davis at Beauvoir." Confederate Historical Institute Journal 1 (Winter 1980): 19-33.

Reviews financial difficulties encountered by Davis after the Civil War that led to his semi-permanent guest status at and eventual purchase of Beauvoir, near Biloxi (Harrison Co.), where he lived until his death in 1889.


Thompson, John Polk. "The American Missionary Association in Mississippi, 1865-1877." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1978. 117 l.

Efforts of the association, originally an abolitionist organization, to establish normal schools for freedmen; founding in 1869 and early problems of Tougaloo College (Hinds Co.) discussed.


Thompson, John L, and William N. Thompson. "Careers of Mississippi Attorneys General." Journal of Mississippi History 35, no. 2 (May 1973): 183-91.

Collective portrait, including scant information on individuals, of the twenty holders of the office from 1874 to 1969.


Thompson, John David. "Stephen D. Lee, P.A.C.S." M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1950. iii, 160 l.

Biography of Lee (1833-1908) includes information on his years in Mississippi, especially his service at the Siege of Vicksburg (Warren Co.) and his presidency of the Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College (now Mississippi State University).


Thompson, Julius E. The Black Press in Mississippi, 1865-1985: A Directory. West Cornwall, Conn.: Locust Hill, 1988. xxiv, 144 pp.

Annotated list of African American organizations, institutions, and publications (mostly newspapers), organized by county.


Thompson, Julius E. The Black Press in Mississippi, 1865-1985. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993. viii, 288 pp.

Chronological study of the changing nature of African American journalism includes list of black-owned newspapers and radio stations; notes that the press "reached its lowest ebb" in the civil rights and post-civil rights eras, 1950-85.


Thompson, Julius E. "Hiram Rhodes Revels, 1827-1901: A Reappraisal." Journal of Negro History 79, no. 3 (Summer 1994): 297-303.

Ambivalent account of the career of Revels, the first African American elected to the U.S. Senate and the first president of Alcorn A&M College (now University); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Hiram R. Revels, 1827-1901: A Biography," Princeton University, 1973.


Thompson, Julius E. Percy Green and the Jackson Advocate: The Life and Times of a Radical Conservative Black Newspaperman, 1897-1977. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 1994. ix, 198 l.

Anomalous career of the editor and publisher of the Advocate (established in 1939); Green was a vocal proponent of African American equality in the 1940s but a reactionary opponent of integration by the 1950s and 1960s.


Thompson, Julius E. "The Size and Composition of Alcorn A&M College Alumni, 1871-1930." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 3 (Aug. 1989): 219-31.

Statistical examination of the backgrounds, majors, and occupations of the mostly-male alumni of the Claiborne/Jefferson County school; also includes results of a limited personal information survey of 1920s alumni.


Thompson, Michael D. "Swords into Plowshares: Veterans Administration Institutional On-Farm Training in Mississippi, 1946-1960." Journal of Mississippi History 59, no. 3 (Fall 1997): 211-29.

Blames the program's mixed success on the inability of Mississippi veterans to buy land for their own farms; based on the author's master's thesis, " Educating Mississippi's Farmers, 1944-1961," University of Mississippi, 1995, which also includes chapters on the Cotton Educational Program and WLBT-TV's "Farm Family of the Week" series.


Thompson, Patrick H. The History of the Negro Baptists in Mississippi. Jackson, Miss.: R.W. Bailey, 1898. 669 pp.

Institutional history, focusing on organization of African American Baptist churches and the founding (1890) and subsequent meetings of the General Baptist Missionary Convention of the State of Mississippi; includes biographical sketches of prominent clergymen.


Thompson, R.H. "Suffrage in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 1, no. 1 (June 1898): 25-49.

Discusses territorial and state laws and their constitutional bases relating to the franchise, 1787-1890.


Thompson, Ray M. The Confederate Shrine of Beauvoir. Biloxi, Miss.: C.C. Hamill, 1957. [31] pp.

Tourist pamphlet prepared for the Jefferson Davis Shrine Museum at Beauvoir (Harrison Co.).


Thompson, Tommy R. "Forgiven and Forgotten? The Image of Jefferson Davis in Popular Magazines." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 2 (May 1992): 163-73.

Reviews pro- and anti-Davis sentiment in over twenty articles, 1866-1980.


Thornton, Kevin Pierce. "Symbolism at Ole Miss and the Crisis of Southern Identity." South Atlantic Quarterly 86, no. 3 (Summer 1987): 254-68.

Examines origins of the University of Mississippi's nickname "Ole Miss," the team name "Rebels," the song "Dixie," the Confederate battle flag, the school mascot "Colonel Rebel," and the association of traditions at the university with the Lost Cause; based on the author's master's thesis of the same title, University of Virginia, 1983.


Thornton, Mary Ricks. "The Attitude of Mississippi toward Jefferson Davis, 1861-1865." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1934. vi, 150 l.

Assesses support for Davis by his fellow Mississippians by examining official records of the Confederacy and writings of selected newspaper editors, politicians, and their correspondents.


Tick, Frank H. "The Political and Economic Policies of Robert J. Walker." Ph.D. dissertation, University of California-Los Angeles, 1947. 348 l.

Concentrates on the Washington career of Walker (1801-69) as U.S. senator from Mississippi and secretary of the treasury under James K. Polk.


Tilghman, Gene M. "The Leflores of Mississippi." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1963. 79 l.

History of the prominent Choctaw family, of which Greenwood Leflore (1800-65), nineteenth-century tribal chief, was a member.


Tilly, Bette B. "The Jackson-Dinsmoor Feud: A Paradox in a Minor Key." Journal of Mississippi History 39, no. 2 (May 1977): 117-31.

Controversy, 1813-28, surrounding Andrew Jackson's dismissal of Choctaw Indian agent Silas Dinsmoor.


Timberlake, Elise. "Did the Reconstruction Regime Give Mississippi Her Public Schools?" Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (1912): 72-93.

Origin of free public schools, many of which existed in larger municipalities before the Civil War.


Tindall, George B. "Beyond the Mainstream: The Ethnic Southerners." Journal of Southern History 40, no. 1 (Feb. 1974): 3-18.

Mentions Chinese-Americans in Mississippi.


Tinsley, Sammy Jay. "A History of Mississippi Valley State College." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1972. 293 l.

History, 1946-71, of the historically-black institution located near Itta Bena (Leflore Co.); includes considerable information on the leadership of the college's only president in the period, James Herbert White.


Tippah County Historical and Genealogical Society. A History of Tippah County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: National ShareGraphics, 1981. 723 pp.

Covers communities, churches, schools, and newspapers; bulk of the volume is comprised of family histories.


Tipton, Nancy Carol. "'It Is My Duty': The Public Career of Belle Kearney." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1975. iv, 158 l.

Life of Kearney (1863-1939), temperance and social reformer, suffragist, and the first woman legislator in Mississippi, 1924-26.


Tise, Larry E. Proslavery: A History of the Defense of Slavery in America, 1701-1840. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1987. xix, 501 pp.

Includes brief discussion of Augustus Baldwin Longstreet (1790-1870), president of the University of Mississippi, 1849-56, and of Methodist clergyman William Winans (1788-1857).


Titus, David E. The Failure of the Confederate Vicksburg Campaign. Carlisle Barracks, Pa.: U.S. Army War College, 1996. ii, 27 pp.

Finds that Vicksburg (Warren Co.) was lost in 1863 primarily due to disunity within the Confederate command.


Todd, Ida Faye. "The Southern Reporter, 1885-1930." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1955. 83 l.

Local history and culture of Sardis (Panola Co.) as revealed in the town's newspaper; includes biographical information on the paper's founder, James Frederick Simmons (1826-1905).


Toler, Vera Alice. "Greenwood Leflore, Choctaw Chieftain and Mississippi Planter." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1936. iv, 103 l.

Life of the last Choctaw chief (1800-65) before removal who became a prosperous Delta planter.


Tolson, Jay. Pilgrim in the Ruins: A Life of Walker Percy. N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, 1992. 544 pp.

Psychological and literary biography of the Louisiana novelist (1916-90) who spent his adolescence in Greenville (Washington Co.) as the adopted son of his cousin William Alexander Percy; first three chapters of the volume deal with Percy family history.


Tooker, Elisabeth. "Natchez Social Organization: Fact or Anthropological Folklore?" Ethnohistory 10, no. 4 (Fall 1963): 358-72.

Disputes the analysis of Natchez Indian social structure posited by John R. Swanton in his 1911 monograph, Indian Tribes of the Lower Mississippi Valley and Adjacent Coast of the Gulf of Mexico, and suggests instead that a system more typical of other southeastern tribes may be closer to the mark.


Toulmin, George B. "The Political Ideas of Winthrop Sargent, a New England Federalist on the Frontier." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 4 (Oct. 1953): 207-29.

Based on territorial governor Sargent's (1753-1820) own writings on democracy and aristocracy, national government, separation of powers, local self-government, justice and civil liberties, Indian affairs, slavery, and public administration; concludes that his political ideas represented typical Federalist thinking of the day.


Towns, W. Stuart. "'To Preserve the Traditions of Our Fathers': The Post-War Speaking Career of Jefferson Davis." Journal of Mississippi History 52, no. 2 (May 1990): 111-24.

Characterizes Davis's speeches from 1870 to 1886 as consistently representative of the values of the Old South.


Trelease, Allen W. White Terror: The Ku Klux Klan Conspiracy and Southern Reconstruction. N.Y.: Harper and Row, 1971. xlviii, 557 pp.

Chapters five and seventeen deal briefly with Mississippi, including the strength of the Klan in the east central counties from 1868 to 1871; chapter eighteen, "Mississippi: The Campaign Against Schools," deals with Klan intimidation and violence, including the 1871 Meridian (Lauderdale Co.) Riot and Klan efforts to destroy Reconstruction public schools for African Americans.


"Troop 'H'-First Mississippi Cavalry." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 19 (Sept. 1981): 6-8.

First World War I troop recruited in the county in 1917.


Troup, Suzanne. "Varina Howell Davis, 1826-1906." M.A. thesis, California State University, Fullerton, 1982. iii, 244 l.

Concentrates on the period from 1889 to 1906, after the death of her husband Jefferson Davis.


Tubb, J.M. "Senatorial Career of James Lusk Alcorn." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1937. vi, 80 l.

Sympathetic assessment of Alcorn (1816-94), Reconstruction governor and U.S. senator, 1871-77.


Tucker, Glenn. "Untutored Genius of the War." Civil War Times Illustrated 3, no. 3 (June 1964): 6-9, 19-23, 33.

Praises abilities of Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest, who lacked a college education.


Tucker, Phillip Thomas. "Forgotten Confederate General: John Stevens Bowen." Journal of Mississippi History 50, no. 3 (Aug. 1988): 135-52.

Georgia native Bowen commanded the first Missouri Confederate Infantry at Fort Pillow, Shiloh, Corinth (Alcorn Co.), and Vicksburg (Warren Co.) before dying of natural causes near Raymond (Hinds Co.) in July 1863.


Tuepker, John Lee. "The Effects of World War II on Blacks in Harrison County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1993. iv, 171 l.

Changes wrought largely by the existence of Keesler Air Base in Biloxi and the Ingalls shipyard in Pascagoula (Jackson Co.).


Tuggle, John Anthony. "The Dixiecrats as a 'Stepping-Stone' to Two-Party Politics for Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1994. vi, 147 l.

Suggests that the breakaway Democratic movement had a major impact on the subsequent development of a viable, anti-civil rights Republican Party by the 1960s.


Turitz, Leo, and Evelyn Turitz. Jews in Early Mississippi. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1983. xviii, 134 pp.

Pictorial history of Jewish families, 1840s-1900.


Turner, Gwin Terrell. "The Administration of Governor Andrew Houston Longino." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1954. iv, 98 l.

Problems encountered (poor race relations, mob violence, corruption) and accomplishments (primary election law, penal reform, education reform, new state capitol) of the Longino administration, 1900-1904.


Turner, Mrs. Paul [Nancy Holladay]. "Choctaw-Creek Battle Fought on Noxubee Soil" Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 4 (Dec. 1977): 3.

Brief account of the battle near Cooksville, c.1790.


Turner, Mrs. Paul [Nancy Holladay]. "Confederate Soldiers of Cooksville." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 1 (Mar. 1977): 6-7.

Very brief biographical sketches of forty-five soldiers.


Turner, Mrs. Paul [Nancy Holladay]. "Pioneer Profile." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 31 (Sept. 1984): 1.

Very brief sketch of Felix H. Walker, who served on the county's first Board of Police, 1834.


Turner, Mrs. Paul [Nancy Holladay]. "Shuqualak Teacher Was Noted Confederate Scout." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 6 (June 1978): 8.

Brief sketch of Benjamin Franklin Stringfellow (1840-1913).


Turner, Nancy Holladay. "Cooksville During the 1830s." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 29 (Mar. 1984): 9-10.

Organization, early white settlers, and churches.


Turner, Nancy Holladay. "Marie Bankhead Owen Was Noxubee Native." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 10 (June 1979): 4.

Very brief sketch of Owen (1869-1958), a member of the noted Bankhead family of Alabama.


Turner, Nancy Holladay. "Noxubee County Celebrated Completion of the Railroad to Macon." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 10 (June 1979): 8.

Completion of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, 1856.


Turner, Nancy Holladay. "Noxubee Landowner Served as Oklahoma's Tenth Governor." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 20 (Dec. 1981): 6-7.

Sketch of Ernest Whitworth Marland (d. 1941).


Turner, Nancy Holladay. "Pushmataha, Most Prominent of Choctaw Chiefs, Was Born in Noxubee Soil." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 16 (Dec. 1980): 2-3.

Very brief sketch of Pushmataha (1764-1824).


Tutor, Forrest Travis. "Robert Gordon of Lochinvar." Journal of Monroe County History 13 (1987): 3-14.

Life of the founder (1788-1867) of the town of Aberdeen.


Tutor, Richard Marlin. "A History of Speech Education at Mississippi College, 1826-1950." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1964. iii, 81 l.

History of the curriculum and extra-curricular activities in oratory, debating, and dramatics; includes a brief history of the college in Clinton (Hinds Co.).


Twining, David C. "Winthrop Sargent: First Territorial Governor of Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Virginia, 1968. 69 l.

Sympathetic portrait of Sargent (b. 1753) interprets his failure to be reappointed as a reflection more of the partisan politics of the day than of his incompetence as governor.


Tyson, Raymond W. "William Barksdale and the Brooks-Sumner Assault." Journal of Mississippi History 26, no. 2 (May 1964): 135-40.

Argues that congressman Lawrence M. Keitt of South Carolina, not congressman William Barksdale of Mississippi, assisted in the caning of Charles Sumner by Preston Brooks on the U.S. Senate floor in 1856.


Umoja, Akinyele Kambon. "Eye for an Eye: The Role of Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement." Ph.D. dissertation, Emory University, 1996. 259 l.

Argues for the existence and efficacy of armed self-defense in the Mississippi civil rights movement, 1954-67.


Underwood, Felix J., and R.W. Whitfield. Public Health and Medical Licensure in the State of Mississippi, 1798-1937. Jackson, Miss.: Tucker, 1938. 67 pp.

Traces the establishment of policies and regulations regarding medical licensure and follows the actions of the Mississippi State Board of Health (established 1877) as it dealt with issues of public health and medical practice.


Union County Historical Committee. History of Union County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media, 1990. 458 pp.

Brief narrative history of the county followed by extensive family histories.


United States. Work Projects Administration. Mississippi. Adams County through Yazoo County. Source Material for Mississippi History series. N.p.: Works Progress Administration for Mississippi, 1935-39. 80 vols.

Mississippi Department of Archives and History holds the only available copies of many of the WPA county histories and has microfilmed all of them.


Unkel, Ann Clouston. "The History and Present Welfare Program of the Mississippi Department of Public Welfare." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1963. x, 141 l.

History of the state system, 1936-63, includes information on its organization, administration, and services.


Urban, C. Stanley. "The Abortive Quitman Filibustering Expedition, 1853-1855." Journal of Mississippi History 18, no. 3 (July 1956): 175-96.

Distraught over the balance of power created by the Compromise of 1850, former Mississippi governor John A. Quitman led an unsuccessful attempt to annex Cuba as a slave state.


Urban, Joan. Richard Wright. Los Angeles: Melrose Square, 1990. 171 [viii] pp.

Undocumented brief biography of the African American writer (1908-60) who was a native of Natchez (Adams Co.).


Urofsky, Melvin I. "Blanche K. Bruce: United States Senator, 1875-1881." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 2 (May 1967): 118-41.

Reviews and evaluates the career of the first full-term African American U.S. senator from Mississippi.


Usner, Daniel H., Jr. "American Indians on the Cotton Frontier: Changing Economic Relations with Citizens and Slaves in the Mississippi Territory." Journal of American History 72, no. 3 (Sept. 1985): 297-317.

Details the far-reaching economic effects of the institution of slavery, the development of the cotton economy, and the Creek War of 1813-14 on Native Americans in the territorial period, 1798-1817.


Usner, Daniel H., Jr. "A Cycle of Lowland Forest Efficiency: The Late Archaic-Woodland Economy of the Lower Mississippi Valley." Journal of Anthropological Research 39, no. 4 (Winter 1983): 433-44.

Proposes a possible economic model of the "system of exploitation" by prehistoric hunter-gatherers.


Usner, Daniel H., Jr. "The Frontier Exchange Economy of the Lower Mississippi Valley in the Eighteenth Century." William and Mary Quarterly 44, no. 2 (Apr. 1987): 165-92.

Illuminates the "cross-cultural web of economic relations" in the region that includes Native Americans, European settlers, and slaves.


Usner, Daniel H., Jr. Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in a Frontier Exchange Economy: The Lower Mississippi Valley before 1783. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992. xvii, 294 pp.

Examines the pre-plantation economy of the region, which included the southern portion of present-day Mississippi; delineates the extent of participation in the economy by yeoman farmers, slaves, and Indians, and the effect on them of changing demographics and greater legal restraints throughout the colonial period, 1699-1783; winner of the Jamestown Manuscript Prize.


Vaiden Garden Club. Vaiden Heritage. Florence, Miss.: Messenger, 1976. 280, [ii] pp.

History of the Carroll County town, 1837-1970s, including early settlers, churches, clubs, structures, professional white citizens, and African American citizens.


Van Court, Catharine. In Old Natchez. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, Doran, 1937. xvi, 119 pp.

Brief history of Adams County historical sites followed by descriptions of thirty-one antebellum houses.


Van der Weele, Wayne J. "Henry Stuart Foote: Stentorian 'Statesman' of the Old South." M.A. thesis, Indiana University, 1952. v, 191 l.

Controversial career of Foote (1804-80), U.S. senator and governor Mississippi.


Van Horne, John C. "Andrew Ellicott's Mission to Natchez (1796-1798)." Journal of Mississippi History 45, no. 3 (Aug. 1983): 160-85.

Details Ellicott's mission to negotiate and survey the southern boundary of the Mississippi Territory after the Treaty of San Lorenzo (1795) with Spain; includes information on conflicts with Governor Manual Gayoso de Lemos and Ellicott's successful stabilization of Natchez after the Spanish withdrawal.


Van Wingen, John R. "Localism, Factional Fluidity, and Factionalism: Louisiana and Mississippi Gubernatorial Contests." Social Science History 8, no. 1 (Winter 1984): 3-42.

Quantitative vote analysis compares the extent of factional (intraparty) politics in the two states as revealed in governors' races, 1903-79; finds that even with the advent of two-party politics, non-substantive issues still often determined the outcomes of the elections.


Vance, Sandra Stringer. "The Congressional Career of John Bell Williams, 1947-1967." Ph.D. dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1976. 322 l.

Focuses on Williams's years in Congress, where he was known as a "devout proponent of racial segregation."


Vance, W. Silas. "The Marion Riot." Mississippi Quarterly 27, no. 4 (Fall 1974): 447-66.

Narrative of the 1881 Lauderdale Co. riot in which six whites and two African Americans died; traces causes and consequences of the melee, which the author believes may have been the last race riot of the era.


Vande Kieft, Ruth M. Eudora Welty. N.Y.: Twayne, 1962. 203 pp.

Primarily a work of criticism, the first chapter contains biographical information about the Jackson (Hinds Co.) writer (1909-2001).


Vandiver, Frank E. "Jefferson Davis and Unified Army Command." Louisiana Historical Quarterly 38, no. 1 (Jan. 1955): 26-38.

Problems Davis faced in his struggle for unity among the various isolated field forces.


Vandiver, Frank E. "Jefferson Davis-Leader without Legend." Journal of Southern History 43, no. 1 (Feb. 1977): 3-18.

Reviews writings on Davis and concludes that historians have reviled him largely because of his personality and his unpopular decisions.


Varnado, Lucy (Wall). Osyka: A Memorial History, 1812-1978. McComb, Miss.: Modern Bonney Printing, 1979. 214 pp.

Emphasizes primary material and genealogy, but also includes information on the Pike County town's businesses, professionals, clubs, religion, and the railroad.


Vaughn, Margaret R. "William Carey Crane and the Sectional Conflict." M.A. thesis, Baylor University, 1968. 109 l.

Crane (1816-85) was president of three small colleges in Mississippi (Yazoo Classical Hall, Mississippi Female College, and Semple Broadus College) before becoming president of Baylor.


Verney, Kevern John. "Contrast and Continuity: 'Black' Reconstruction in South Carolina and Mississippi, 1861-1877." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Keele (U.K.), 1987. 402 l.

Case studies of the two states in which, according to the author, "blacks came closest to achieving meaningful political and economic power in the South."


Vickers, Ovid. "Mississippi Choctaw Names and Naming: A Diachronic View." Names 31, no. 2 (June 1983): 117-22.

Changes in naming patterns due to contact with Europeans and marriage outside the tribe; by the late nineteenth century Choctaws adopted European and Biblical names instead of names related to deeds or events.


Vickers, Ovid. "Neshoba's Folk Fair." Mississippi Folklore Register 11, no. 1 (Spring 1977): 11-17.

History of the Neshoba County Fair from 1891 to the 1970s; describes structures, entertainment, music, and politics.


Vickers, Ovid. "Newt Knight and the Free State of Jones: Fact, Fiction, and Folklore." Mississippi Folklore Register 14, no. 2 (Fall 1980): 75-81.

History, folklore, and fictional portrayal of the myth of the secession of Jones County from the Confederate States of America.


Vickers, Ovid. "Pacaritambo, Nanih Waiya, and That Leaning Pole." Mississippi Folklore Register 7, no. 1 (Spring 1973): 1-6.

Briefly reviews the Choctaw creation myths.


Vicksburg Under Glass: A Collection of Early Photographs from the Glass Negatives of J. Mack Moore. Raymond, Miss.: Keith, 1975. 67 pp.

Over one hundred photographs of the Vicksburg (Warren Co.) area, 1890s-1930s, including monument construction in the Vicksburg National Military Park; includes captions and an essay on Moore (1868-1954).


Viera, Michelle Margaret. "A Summary of the Contributions of Four Key African American Female Figures of the Civil Rights Movement." M.A. thesis, Western Michigan University, 1994. iv, 108 l.

Includes section on Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-77) of Ruleville (Sunflower Co.).


Views…Natchez, Mississippi. Natchez, Miss.: Tom L. Ketchings, n.d. [98] pp.

Chiefly captioned photographs of mansions and churches; includes brief undocumented history of Natchez (Adams Co.) by Edith Wyatt Moore.


Viitanen, Wayne J. "The Winter the Mississippi Ran Backwards: The Impact of the New Madrid, Missouri, Earthquake of 1811-1812 on Life and Letters in the Mississippi Valley." Ph.D. dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 1972. 225 l.

Narrative of the catastrophic earthquake, which affected much of northern Mississippi; also examines the evolving literary traditions and religious revivalism in the wake of the disaster.


Vining, James W. "Mississippi Agriculture in the Early American Geographies." Mississippi Geographer 10, no. 1 (Spring 1982): 18-23.

Traces the portrayal of Mississippi agriculture in nineteenth-century geographical texts and readers.


Vinsel, Kenneth Paul. "Political Parties in Mississippi, 1817-1843." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1927. v, 104 l.

Covers American political parties in 1817, Jacksonian Democrats and Whigs in the 1820s and 1830s, and the banking and repudiation controversies of the 1840s.


Viorst, Milton. Fire in the Streets: America in the 1960s. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 1979. 591 pp.

Chapter seven, "Joseph L. Rauh, Jr.: Organizing Mississippi, 1964," profiles liberal lawyer Rauh (b. 1911) and tells the story of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's voter registration campaign in Mississippi and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party's seating challenge at the Democratic National Convention.


Vogt, Daniel C. "Government Reform, the 1890 Constitution, and Mike Conner." Journal of Mississippi History 48, no. 1 (Feb. 1986): 43-56.

Efforts of the gubernatorial administration, 1932-36, of Conner to achieve a variety of reforms and to convene a constitutional convention; observes that a similar scenario has been played out many times since 1890, as groups have unsuccessfully attemped to scrap the problem-plagued constitution.


Vogt, Daniel C. "Hoover's RFC in Action: Mississippi, Bank Loans, and Work Relief, 1932-1933." Journal of Mississippi History 47, no. 1 (Feb. 1985): 35-53.

Evaluates the effectiveness of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation in Mississippi.


Vogt, Daniel C. "A Note on Mississippi Republicans in 1912." Journal of Mississippi History 49, no. 1 (Feb. 1987): 49-55.

Uses the 1910 U.S. Census to categorize approximately two hundred Republican and Progressive Party convention delegates by race, age, property ownership, residence, state of birth, and occupation.


Vogt, Daniel C. "Poor Relief in Frontier Mississippi, 1798-1832." Journal of Mississippi History 51, no. 3 (Aug. 1989): 181-99.

Demonstrates that poor relief laws and practice for white citizens in the territorial and early statehood periods resembled that in the rest of America and in England.


Vogt, Daniel Camille. "Problems of Government Regulation: The Mississippi Railroad Commission, 1884-1956." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1980. 255 l.

Politics that hampered the regulatory agency, which was renamed the Public Service Commission in 1938; it had, at various times, authority over the railroads, the state penitentiary, telephone and telegraph companies, motor carriers, and electric and gas utilities.


Vollers, Maryanne. Ghosts of Mississippi: The Murder of Medgar Evers, the Trials of Byron De La Beckwith, and the Haunting of the New South. Boston: Little, Brown, 1995. x, 411 pp.

Inspired by the 1992 retrial of Beckwith; tells the story of the 1963 murder of NAACP leader Evers in Jackson (Hinds Co.), Beckwith's two initial mistrials, and the construction of a successful case against him nearly three decades later based on new evidence and a determination by prosecutors (especially Bobby DeLaughter) to achieve a conviction.


Volstorff, Vivian Virginia. "William Charles Cole Claiborne: A Study in Frontier Administration." Ph.D. dissertation, Northwestern University, 1932. 260 l.

Includes discussion of Claiborne's term as governor of the Mississippi Territory, 1801-1803, but the majority of the text deals with his years in Louisiana, where he was the first governor of the state.


Wade, John Donald. Augustus Baldwin Longstreet: A Study of the Development of Culture in the South. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1924. ix, 392 pp.

Standard biography of Longstreet (1790-1870), jurist, clergyman, author, and president of the University of Mississippi from 1849 to 1856.


Wade, John Coleman, Jr. "Charles Clark, Confederate General and Mississippi Governor." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1949. v, 112 l.

Concentrates on the period from 1860 to 1865, when wartime governor Clark (b. 1810) tried to mediate between the demands of the Confederate government for taxes and conscription to support the war and the pressing daily needs of his impoverished constituency.


Wade, John William. "Lands of the Liquidating Levee Board through Litigation and Legislation." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 273-313.

Explores the implications for future Delta development of 1858 legislation that empowered the Board of Levee Commissioners to collect acreage taxes for levee construction and maintenance; includes detailed title history of the land that became the Delta and Pine Land Company (Bolivar Co.).


Wade, John William. "The Removal of the Mississippi Choctaws." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 397-426.

Undocumented essay emphasizes adjudication of Choctaw land claims guaranteed under article fourteen of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek (1830).


Wagers, Margaret Newman. The Education of a Gentleman: Jefferson Davis at Transylvania, 1821-1824. Lexington, Ky.: Buckley and Reading, 1943. [10], 38 pp, [9].

Davis's years at Transylvania University in Lexington.


Wagstaff, Thomas. "Call Your Old Master-'Master': Southern Political Leaders and Negro Labor during Presidential Reconstruction." Labor History 10, no. 3 (Summer 1969): 323-45.

Includes quotes from Mississippi politicians (James L. Alcorn, Henry S. Foote, William L. Yerger, William L. Sharkey) and from newspapers in Vicksburg (Warren Co.), Jackson (Hinds Co.), and Natchez (Adams Co.).


Wailes, B.L.C. Report on the Agriculture and Geology of the State of Mississippi, Embracing a Sketch of the Social and Natural History of the State. Jackson, Miss.: E. Barksdale, 1854. ix, 371 pp.

Includes an introductory chapter on the political history of Mississippi in the colonial period.


Walden, W. Charles. "Individual Migrant and Non-Migrant: Mississippi Delta Region, 1955-66." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1970. 40 l.

Finds that outmigration from Delta counties in Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Missouri consisted primarily of young adults looking for better jobs.


Waldrep, Christopher. "Substituting Law for the Lash: Emancipation and Legal Formalism in a Mississippi County Court." Journal of American History 82, no. 4 (Mar. 1996): 1425-51.

Examines the operation of the lower county court in Warren County during Reconstruction; argues that although the court was created under the Black Codes to control former slaves, it was not in reality controlled by whites, but instead gave freedmen their first access to the legal system.


Waldron, Ann. Hodding Carter: The Reconstruction of a Racist. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin, 1993. xiii, 369 pp.

Biography of William Hodding Carter, Jr. (1907-72), controversial editor and publisher of the Greenville (Washington Co.) Delta Democrat-Times; traces the emergence of his liberal conscience out of his privileged, conservative Louisiana upbringing.


Waldron, Robert. Oprah! N.Y.: St. Martin's, 1987. 154 pp.

Popular biography of entertainer Oprah Winfrey (b. 1954) of Kosciusko (Attala Co.).


Walker, B.M. "History of the First Baptist Church of Starkville, Mississippi, 1839-1939." Journal of Mississippi History 1, no. 4 (Oct. 1939): 241-50.

Institutional history of the Oktibbeha County church.


Walker, C.B. The Mississippi Valley, and Historic Events, Giving an Account of the Original Condition of the Great Valley; of Its Vegetable and Animal Life; of Its First Inhabitants, the Mound Builders, Its Mineral Treasures and Agricultural Developments. All from Authentic Sources. Burlington, Iowa: R.T. Root, 1880. 784 pp.

Wide-ranging history includes material on discovery and early settlement, Native Americans, agriculture, Civil War, constitutions, and population growth.


Walker, Clarence Earl. A Rock in a Weary Land: The African Methodist Episcopal Church during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1982. ix, 157 pp.

Includes information on U.S. representative James R. Lynch and U.S. senator Hiram Revels, both of whom had backgrounds as AME clergymen.


Walker, David Allen. "A History of Commerce and Navigation on the Lower Mississippi, 1803-1840." M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1965. v, 113 l.

Examines flatboat, keelboat, and barge trade (1803-11) and steamboat traffic (1811-40); emphasizes the importance of the port of New Orleans in the development of western trade.


Walker, Margaret. Richard Wright, Daemonic Genius: A Portrait of the Man, a Critical Look at His Work. N.Y.: Warner, 1988. xix, 428 pp.

Extensive critical biography of the novelist (1908-60), a native of Adams County.


Walker, Peter F. Vicksburg: A People at War, 1860-1865. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1960. xvi, 235 pp.

Emphasizes experiences of the populace during siege and Union occupation; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Citadel: Vicksburg and Its People, 1860-1865," Vanderbilt University, 1958.


Wall, Marshall Duell. "Antecedents of Mississippi Constitutional Convention of 1890." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1935. iv, 138 l.

Traditional account of Reconstruction and its aftermath, culminating in the convention, which the author characterizes as an attempt to "purge" the political system of "ignorance and incompetency."


Wallace, Frank. "A History of the Conner Administration." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1959. v, 110 pp.

Fiscal reforms enacted during the 1932-36 gubernatorial administration of Martin Sennett Conner (1891-1950).


Wallace, Jesse T. A History of the Negroes of Mississippi from 1865 to 1890. Clinton, Miss.: the author, 1927. 188 pp.

Describes economic, social, and political conditions of freedmen and defends "separate but equal" and black disfranchisement brought about by the 1890 state constitution; expands on the author's master's thesis, "How and Why the Negro Was Eliminated from State Politics in Mississippi in 1890," University of Chicago, 1923.


Walley, Cherilyn A. "Grady McWhiney's 'Antebellum Piney Woods Culture': The Non-Celtic Origins of Greene County, Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 60, no. 3 (Fall 1998): 223-39.

Uses the 1820 and 1850 U.S. Census schedules to refute historian McWhiney's claim that the Piney Woods region of the state was dominated by settlers of Celtic origin.


Walmsley, James Elliott. "The Presidential Campaign of 1844 in Mississippi." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 9 (1906): 179-97.

Popular feeling about the candidates and issues (the tariff, annexation of Texas, repudiation of state bonds) in the Van Buren-Clay contest.


Walston, Mark L. "'Uncle Tom's Cabin' Revisited: Origins and Interpretations of Slave Housing in the American South." Southern Studies 24, no. 4 (Winter 1985): 357-73.

Includes descriptions from four Mississippi plantations, only one of which (that owned by James K. Polk) is identified.


Walters, Nick. "The Repairman Chairman: Senator James O. Eastland and His Influence in the U.S. Supreme Court." M.A. thesis, Mississippi College, 1992. iii, 80 l.

Eastland's chairmanship of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, especially his role in the defeat of Abe Fortas and the confirmation of William Rehnquist; contends that Eastland "set the standard for judicial selection today" by scrutinizing nominees' judicial philosophies.


Walters, Vernon Larry. "Migration into Mississippi, 1798-1837." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1969. 190 l.

Discusses migration routes, points of origin, early settlements, the first settlers in the Delta, and white inhabitation of Native American lands in northern Mississippi.


Walther, Eric H. The Fire-Eaters. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1992. xviii, 333 pp.

Biographical studies of nine secessionists--including John A. Quitman (1799-1858)-- who were, the author contends, a highly diverse group briefly united by a belief in eighteenth-century republicanism and in the necessity of secession to re-establish it; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Fire-Eaters, the South, and Secession," Louisiana State University, 1988.


Walton, Augustus Q. A History of the Detection, Conviction, Life and Designs of John A. Murel, the Great Western Land Pirate; Together with His System of Villany, and Plan of Exciting a Negro Rebellion, Also, a Catalogue of the Names of Four Hundred and Fifty-Five of His Mystic Clan Fellows and A. Stewart, the Young Man Who Detected Him, to Which is Added a Biographical Sketch of V.A. Stewart. Cincinnati: n.p., n.d. 84 pp.

Brief early account of the life and capture in 1835 of outlaw John A. Murrell (1806-45).


Walton, Frank L. Shubuta: A Brief Story About Shubuta on the Banks of the Chickasawwhay. Shubuta, Miss.: Shubuta Memorial Association, 1947. 48 pp.

Undocumented history-emphasizing social customs--of the Clarke County community from the early 1800s to the 1940s.



Walton, Hanes, Jr. Black Political Parties: A Historical and Political Analysis. N.Y.: Free Press, 1972. xi, 276 pp.

Chapter three, "The Mississippi Political Scene," deals briefly with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) mock election of 1963 and more extensively with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party from 1964 to 1969.


Ward, Rufus A. Jr. "The Tombigbee Crossing of the De Soto Expedition." Mississippi Archaeology 21, no. 2 (Dec. 1986): 62-68.

Finds the Burnet's (Barton's) Ferry location in Lowndes and Clay counties to have been the most likely Tombigbee River crossing point by the Hernando de Soto expedition of 1540-41.


Ware, Hester Sharbrough. "A Study of the Life and Works of William Alexander Percy." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State College, 1950. 133 l.

Percy (1885-1942) of Greenville (Washington Co.) was a poet, author of the reminiscence Lanterns on the Levee, son of U.S. senator Leroy Percy, and guardian of novelist Walker Percy.


Warner, Ezra J. Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1959. xxvii, 420 pp.

Includes brief sketches and portraits of Mississippians William Wirt Adams (1819-88), William Edwin Baldwin (1827-64), William Barksdale (1821-63), Samuel Benton (1820-64), William Lindsay Brandon (1800 or 1802-90), William Felix Brantley (1830-70), Charles Clark (1811-77), Douglas Hancock Cooper (1815-79), Joseph Robert Davis (1825-96), Hiram Bronson Granbury (1831-64), Nathaniel Harrison Harris (1834-1900), Benjamin Grubb Humphreys (1808-82), Stephen Dill Lee (1833-1908), Mark Perrin Lowrey (1828-85), Carnot Posey (1818-63), Alexander Peter Stewart (1821-1908), Earl Van Dorn (1820-63), Edward Cary Walthall (1831-98), and William Henry Chase Whiting (1824-65).


Warren, Harris Gaylord. "Agricultural Statistics of Claiborne County, 1850 and 1860." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 4 (Oct. 1953): 230-41.

Examination of selected census figures for 1850 and 1860 reveals that Claiborne County, typical of many southern counties, experienced economic growth and prosperity in the decade before the Civil War.


Warren, Harry. "Chicksaw Traditions, Customs, etc." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 543-53.

Examines the extent of Chickasaw territory, migration legends, family structure, marriage and burial customs, and laws.


Warren, Harry. "Missions, Missionaries, Frontier Characters and Schools." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 571-98.

Review of earliest Catholic missions in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries; late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century missions by Congregationalists, Presbyterians, and the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions; and Loyalists who sought refuge with and married Native Americans.


Warren, Harry. "Some Chickasaw Chiefs and Prominent Men." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 8 (1904): 555-70.

Mentions the Colbert, Love, and Campbell families, and Piamingo, Tishomingo, Isaac Albertson, James Brown, Topulkey, John Glover, Chickasaw Bill, Creek Billy, Queen Puc-caun-la, John McLish, and Simon Burney.


Warren, Harris Gaylord. "Vignettes of Culture in Old Claiborne." Journal of Mississippi History 20, no. 3 (July 1958): 125-46.

Antebellum education, entertainment, and the press in Claiborne County.


Washburn, William Neil. "Progressive Educational Reform in Mississippi during the First Bilbo Administration, 1916-1920." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1962. 116 l.

Background of the movement for improved schools; legislation passed under governor Theodore G. Bilbo, including expanding the state superintendent's role, compulsory attendence, and vocational education; and the effect of World War I on public education.


"Water for Power in Early Noxubee County." Noxubee County Mississippi Quarterly Bulletin 19 (Sept. 1981): 3-4; 20 (Dec. 1981): 8.

Grain mills, sawmills, and cotton gins on the creeks and rivers in the county, 1840s-1907.


Watkins, Esther Belle. "Some Social and Economic Aspects of Ante-Bellum Neshoba County, Mississippi." M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1942. iv, 113 l.

Includes information on Choctaws, early white settlement, agriculture, slavery, religion, schools, occupations, and entertainment.


Watkins, John A. "The Choctaw in Mississippi." American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal 16, no. 2 (Mar. 1894): 69-77.

History and culture of the Choctaw since the arrival of white settlers.


Watkins, Ruth. "Reconstruction in Newton County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 11 (1910): 205-28.

Undergraduate paper written at the University of Mississippi in 1909-10 covers early history of the county, politics, race relations, education, religion, and the economy; appendices give statistics on population, churches, and manufacturing.


Watkins, Ruth. "Reconstruction in Marshall County." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 12 (1912): 155-213.

Undergraduate paper written at the University of Mississippi in 1912 covers early history of the county, politics, the Freedmen's Bureau, the Loyal League, Ku Klux Klan, education, the economy, and municipalities; appendices give statistics on slaves and their owners, population, agriculture, manufacturing, schools, and taxation.


Watkins, Troy B. "John A. Quitman: Governor of Mississippi, 1850-1851." M.A. thesis, University of Mississippi, 1948. iv, 159 l.

Emphasizes Quitman's tenure as governor, the 1849 and 1851 campaigns, the Nashville Convention of 1850, and the Compromise of 1850, but also includes chapters on Quitman's earlier and later life.


Watson, Charles S. "Order Out of Chaos: Joseph Glover Baldwin's The Flush Times of Alabama and Mississippi." Alabama Review 45, no. 4 (Oct. 1992): 257-72.

Analyzes the "determined optimism" of Baldwin's 1853 book of sketches that humorously depicts the Southwest's victory over legal, moral, and fiscal chaos.


Watson, Francis Egger. "Dr. Alfred Hume: His Leadership as Vice Chancellor, Acting Chancellor, and Chancellor of the University of Mississippi (1905-1945)." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Mississippi, 1987. 193 l.

Biography of Hume (1866-1950), including discussion of his successful blocking of governor Theodore G. Bilbo's 1928 plan to move the University of Mississippi from Oxford (Lafayette Co.) to Jackson (Hinds Co.).


Watters, Pat, and Reese Cleghorn. Climbing Jacob's Ladder: The Arrival of Negroes in Southern Politics. N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1967. xvi, 389 pp.

Includes brief mentions of Mississippi persons and events in the civil rights movement and an interview with Annelle Ponder and Fannie Lou Hamer about the "Winona Incident" of June 1963.


Wayne, Michael. "An Old South Morality Play: Reconsidering the Social Underpinnings of the Proslavery Ideology." Journal of American History 77, no. 3 (Dec. 1990): 838-63.

Examines aftermath of the 1857 murder by three slaves of overseer Duncan Skinner near Kingston (Adams Co.).


Wayne, Michael. The Reshaping of Plantation Society: The Natchez District, 1860-1880. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1983. xii, 226 pp.

Uses quantitative methods to examine the antecedents of the sharecropping system in Southwest Mississippi; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Ante-Bellum Planters in the Post-Bellum South: The Natchez District, 1860-1880," Yale University, 1979.


Wayne, Michael. "The Reshaping of Plantation Society Revisited." Journal of Mississippi History 54, no. 4 (Nov. 1992): 333-48.

Recalling the research for his 1983 book, the author examines the effects of the Civil War on the society, economy, and moral vision of the Natchez District.


Weathersby, Robert W., II. J.H. Ingraham. Boston: Twayne, 1980. 164 pp.

Biography, interwoven with literary criticism, of Ingraham (1809-60), novelist and Episcopal clergyman of Holly Springs (Marshall Co.); based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "Joseph Holt Ingraham: A Critical Introduction to the Man and His Works," University of Tennessee, 1974.


Weathersby, W.H. "A History of Mississippi College." Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society 5 (Centenary Series, 1925): 184-220.

History of the Clinton (Hinds Co.) college from its incorporation as Hamstead Academy in 1826 through various name and sponsorship changes; appendix lists administrators and faculty members, 1850-early 1920s.


Weathersby, William Henington. A History of Educational Legislation in Mississippi from 1796 to 1860. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1921. Supplemental Educational Monographs. xi, 204 pp.

Examines state laws respecting education and provides information on organization and founding of elementary and secondary schools and institutions of higher learning; reprints the author's Ph.D. dissertation of the same title, University of Chicago, 1919.


Weaver, Herbert. "Foreigners in Ante-Bellum Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 16, no. 3 (July 1954): 151-63.

Suggests that the relatively small number of foreign-born Mississippians acted as a "cultural catalyst" for the entire population.


Weaver, Herbert. Mississippi Farmers, 1850-1860. Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt University Press, 1945. 139 pp.

Social and economic analysis concludes that the farm, rather than the plantation, was the "basic agricultural unit," that the economies of Mississippi and the seaboard South were fundamentally dissimilar, and that poor whites represented a small minority of farmers; based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation, "The Agricultural Population of Mississippi, 1850-1860," Vanderbilt University, 1941.


Webb, Constance. Richard Wright: A Biography. N.Y.: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1968. 443 pp.

Early biography of African American writer Wright (1908-60), who was born in Adams County.


Webster County History Association. The History of Webster County, Mississippi. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media Corp., 1985. 503 pp.

History of the county, which was originally part of Choctaw County, then established as Sumner County in 1874, and finally renamed Webster County in 1882; emphasizes family histories.


Weeks, Billy R. "The Pledge 'To Plow a Straight Furrow': The 1947 Senatorial Campaign of John C. Stennis." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1974. 96 l.

Stennis (1901-95), considered a moderate, emerged as the successor to Theodore G. Bilbo following a race notable for the presence of several Bilbo imitators.


Weeks, Linton. Clarksdale and Coahoma County: A History. Clarksdale, Miss.: Carnegie Public Library, 1982. ix, 265 pp.

History and gazetteer of the county, 1830-1980, including material on Friar's Point, James Lusk Alcorn, founding families (Clark, Bobo), Civil War and Reconstruction, agriculture, schools, newspapers, and public facilities; two chapters devoted to African American citizens and blues music.


Weeks, Linton. Cleveland: A Centennial History, 1886-1986. Cleveland, Miss.: City of Cleveland, 1985. x, 237 pp.

Heavily illustrated history of the Bolivar County town.


Weems, Bob. Charles Read: Confederate Buccaneer. Jackson, Miss.: Heritage Books, 1982. 182 pp., [x].

Exploits of Confederate naval officer Charles William Read (1840-90) of Yazoo County.


Weems, Bob. Sam Dale-Southern Pioneer. Florence, Miss.: Messenger, 1974. 184 pp.

Undocumented biography of Dale (1772-1841), soldier and legislator.


Weems, Robert Cicero, Jr. "The Bank of the Mississippi: A Pioneer Bank of the Old Southwest, 1809-1844. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1951. 819 l.

Exhaustive history of the state bank.


Weems, Robert C., Jr. "The Makers of the Bank of the Mississippi." Journal of Mississippi History 15, no. 3 (July 1953): 137-54.

Biographical sketches of the thirteen original supervisors of the Bank of the Mississippi, 1809-31: Winthrop Sargent, Lyman Harding, Abijah Hunt, Ferdinand L. Claiborne, Samuel Postlethwaite, Abner Green, John Steele, Francis X. Martin, Alexander Montgomery, William B. Shields, Joseph Sessions, Ebenezer Reese, and Cowles Mead.


Weems, Robert C., Jr. "Mississippi's First Banking System." Journal of Mississippi History 29, no. 4 (Nov. 1967): 386-408.

Conversion of the Bank of the Mississippi to the Bank of the State of Mississippi in 1818.


Weems, Robert C., Jr. "A Revolt Against King Cotton in 1829." Mississippi Quarterly 9, no. 1 (Fall 1955): 1-13.

Natchez- (Adams Co.) area citizens re-examined the dominance of the cotton-slave economy in the face of declining cotton profits, the passage of the Tariff of 1828, and the controversy over the monopolistic Bank of the State of Mississippi.


Weill, Susan Marie. "'In a Madhouse's Din': Civil Rights Coverage by Mississippi's Daily Press, 1848-1968." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern Mississippi, 1998. 422 l.

Coverage by each of the state's daily newspapers of the 1948 Dixiecrat protest, the 1954 Brown decision, the integration of the University of Mississippi by James Meredith in 1962, Freedom Summer (1964), and the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968.


Weinert, Richard P. "The Neglected Key to the Gulf Coast." Journal of Mississippi History 31, no. 4 (Nov. 1969): 269-301.

Details the strategic military importance of Ship Island in the Gulf of Mexico near Biloxi (Harrison Co.), 1699-1870; much of the article is devoted to Civil War action on or near the island.


Weinstein, Richard A. "Some New Thoughts on the De Soto Expedition through Western Mississippi." Mississippi Archaeology 20, no. 2 (Dec. 1985): 2-24.

Evidence supporting the argument that de Soto crossed the Mississippi River in 1541 at Sunflower Landing (Coahoma Co.).


Welch, Frank James. "The Plantation Economy as It Relates to Land Tenure in Mississippi." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Wisconsin, 1943. x, 255 pp.

First two chapters provide background and history of the development of the plantation system in the state; remainder analyzes the operation and efficiency of large farms and the socio-economic conditions of tenants and sharecroppers in the early 1940s.


Weller, Jac. "Nathan Bedford Forrest: An Analysis of Untutored Military Genius." Tennessee Historical Quarterly 18, no. 3 (Sept. 1959): 213-51.

Finds that the Confederate general, who lived in North Mississippi as a youth and became a great military leader despite his lack of training, had an "almost unique aptitude for war."


Wells, Dean Faulkner, and Hunter Cole, eds. Mississippi Heroes. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1980. xvi, 230 pp.

Essays on Thomas Rodney (1744-1811), Samuel Dale (1772-1841), Greenwood Leflore (1800-65), Jefferson Davis (1808-89), L.Q.C. Lamar (1825-93), William Alexander Percy (1885-1942), Martin Sennett Conner (1891-1950), Jimmie Rodgers (1897-1933), William Faulkner (1897-1962), and Medgar Wylie Evers (1926-63).


Wells, James M. The Chisholm Massacre: A Picture of "Home Rule" in Mississippi. Chicago: Agency Chisholm Monumental Fund, 1877. 291 pp.

Early account of post-Reconstruction-era violence in Kemper County, 1877.


Wells, Mary Ann. Native Land: Mississippi, 1540-1798. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1994. xi, 238 pp.

Colonial history emphasizing Native Americans.


Wells, Raymond B. "The States' Rights Movement of 1948: A Case Study." M.A. thesis, Mississippi State University, 1965. 141 l.

Ideological origins and political strategy of the ant